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Remedial Education

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1999
Re "Remedial Classes at Cal State," Letters to the Editor, Nov. 9. It gives me hope to know that some of Los Angeles' future teachers are beginning as remedial students. Of course they belong in the university, having met California's own criterion for admission. Besides passing all remedial classes, for which they receive no credit, they have to pass several regular classes at the same time. Once they've finished the remedial class (or classes) in math or composition, they take exactly the same sequence of general education classes as everyone else.
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OPINION
September 16, 2013 | By Lois Davis
If California is serious about reducing its prison population, one crucial component will have to be reducing recidivism. Currently, a lot of the state's inmates are men and women who've been in prison more than once. They get out, they have little training or education, they can't get jobs and, in many cases, they return to lives of crime and find themselves back behind bars. But a major new study of correctional education in U.S. state prisons suggests there are things California could do to slow that revolving door.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | ED BOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1994, nearly 70% of Cal State Northridge freshmen needed remedial education for math and English. Last week, college officials learned that placed the Northridge school among the highest in remedial education in the Cal State system. Some educators blamed the numbers on the public school system. Others point out that colleges must accommodate higher numbers of urban, minority students from low-income families that lack a tradition of education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
The vast Los Angeles Community College District will gain experience and potentially greater political clout with wins by a past college president and a veteran state lawmaker to the Board of Trustees in this week's elections. But the results are not likely to radically alter the direction of an overburdened system that is the entry point for thousands of college students each year. Former East Los Angeles College president Ernest Henry Moreno and termed-out Monterey Park Democratic Assemblyman Mike Eng won solid majorities in unofficial results posted Wednesday.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to phase out remedial education in the California State University system by substantially toughening admissions requirements came under heavy fire Tuesday from students, a group of state lawmakers and Latino activists during its initial hearing. At a Cal State Board of Trustees committee meeting, the three groups of critics all warned that the proposal could result in masses of students being turned away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995
In an unfortunate retreat on remedial education, California State University trustees now say they will wait until 2007 to fully implement stricter standards and thus reduce the large numbers of academically unqualified students in the 22-campus system. One negative effect of the decision will be to ease pressure on elementary and secondary schools to set more ambitious academic goals in preparing students for college.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The California State University board of trustees, determined to address the cost and scope of remedial education, took its first cautious step Wednesday toward scaling back courses that some say are vital to the success of thousands of students, particularly minorities. The board unanimously approved a resolution that calls for the development of "specific, practical action plans" to reduce the number of remedial courses at Cal State.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Almost half the freshmen throughout the 20-campus California State University system do so poorly on math and English placement exams that they have to enroll in remedial classes to prepare for college-level courses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing that university students should understand basic math and English when they begin their higher educations, Cal State University trustees have taken their first steps toward sharply reducing the number of remedial-education courses offered at the system's 21 campuses. The move comes amid growing national debate over whether remedial education is appropriate at the university level, especially during a time of tight budgets.
OPINION
September 16, 2013 | By Lois Davis
If California is serious about reducing its prison population, one crucial component will have to be reducing recidivism. Currently, a lot of the state's inmates are men and women who've been in prison more than once. They get out, they have little training or education, they can't get jobs and, in many cases, they return to lives of crime and find themselves back behind bars. But a major new study of correctional education in U.S. state prisons suggests there are things California could do to slow that revolving door.
WORLD
March 5, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - Syria's civil conflict has battered the nation's education system, depriving hundreds of thousands of children of schooling, UNICEF said Tuesday. One in 5 Syrian schools have suffered damage or have been converted into shelters, UNICEF said in a new overview of the parlous state of education in Syria, where an armed rebellion has been raging for almost two years. In some cases, UNICEF said, armed groups have commandeered schools. At least 2,400 schools have been damaged or destroyed, the U.N. children's agency said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Edward Yacuta felt rushed and nervous when he took a test to determine whether he was ready for college-level English classes at Long Beach City College. The 18-year-old did poorly on the exam, even though he was getting good grades in an Advanced Placement English class at Long Beach's Robert A. Millikan High School. Most community colleges would assign students like Yacuta to a remedial class, but he will avoid that fate at Long Beach. The two-year school is trying out a new system this fall that will place students who graduated from the city's high schools in courses based on their grades rather than their scores on the standardized placement tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2006 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
Less than half of the freshmen currently in the California State University system were ready for college-level math and English courses upon enrollment -- a figure significantly below the goal established by the system's trustees a decade ago -- a new report said. University officials told the Board of Trustees on Tuesday that 45% of students who entered the Cal State system in the fall were prepared for college-level work, a mere 2% increase from the previous year.
OPINION
July 6, 2005
My sincere thanks to The Times for printing as its Fourth of July editorial the text of the Declaration of Independence. It is a unique and extraordinary document that inspired and continues to inspire not only our nation but, as well, people around the world. In reading it once again, however, I was struck by the number of offenses attributed to the "British crown" that have been, and are being, committed by the current administration. Perhaps it is time for some remedial education, not only of our nation's leader and certain members of his administration and party but also of the bare majority of voters who returned this particular George to a second term in order that he might continue to pursue policies so at odds with our founders' ideals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2004 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
California State University threw out fewer freshmen last year for failing to master basic math or English skills, but most first-year students still arrive on campus unprepared for college work, officials reported Wednesday. Top administrators for the 23-campus system expressed frustration about the weak skills of arriving students. They noted that only 42% of the freshmen who started last fall were proficient in math and English, as measured by placement exams.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of the cornerstones of President Bush's campaign: vouchers for low-income students caught in failing schools. But on Tuesday--to no one's surprise--the Senate defeated, on a 58-41 vote, a last, modest effort by conservative Republicans to include a voucher provision in education reform legislation sought by Bush. The amendment, offered by Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), would have provided $50 million for a pilot voucher program limited to 10 school districts in three states.
NEWS
August 14, 1986
The state has provided $87,167 to nine schools in the Arcadia Unified School District under the Educational Technology Local Assistance Program to purchase computers. The district will provide an additional $8,716 under the program. The computers will be used for remedial education, language and writing skills, word processing and math and science skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Edward Yacuta felt rushed and nervous when he took a test to determine whether he was ready for college-level English classes at Long Beach City College. The 18-year-old did poorly on the exam, even though he was getting good grades in an Advanced Placement English class at Long Beach's Robert A. Millikan High School. Most community colleges would assign students like Yacuta to a remedial class, but he will avoid that fate at Long Beach. The two-year school is trying out a new system this fall that will place students who graduated from the city's high schools in courses based on their grades rather than their scores on the standardized placement tests.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The suggestion came as a casual comment from a script consultant in New York: Nix the rabbit and have the little boy play with a doll. It was a simple request, no doubt aimed at broadening concepts about gender. But for a conservative Muslim country, it was just too extreme. "We insisted, 'No, little boys don't play with dolls.'
NEWS
July 3, 2000 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Rather than allow ill-prepared high school students to flounder and probably drop out of school, schools ought to give such students a year of intensive retraining in the basic reading and arithmetic skills they missed in elementary school, says Sandra Feldman, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, in a speech she is to give in Philadelphia today.
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