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HEALTH
October 10, 2005 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Are there any natural treatments for narcolepsy and cataplexy? Narcolepsy is a condition in which people fall asleep suddenly during waking hours. If they lose muscle control, it is called cataplexy. Some narcoleptics can even fall asleep and collapse while crossing the street. There are no natural remedies for this serious ailment, unless you consider gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB). This compound is made in very small quantities by the body. Doctors can now prescribe it by the name Xyrem.
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NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
AUSTIN, Texas - President Obama has tried to model Abraham Lincoln's team of rivals and Teddy Roosevelt's power of the bully pulpit. He's lauded Ronald Reagan's communication skills and linked himself to the Kennedy clan. He's praised his onetime nemesis, George W. Bush, as well as his onetime adversary, Bill Clinton. But Obama has rarely cozied up to the predecessor some argue did more than any other modern president to pave the way for his election as the nation's first black president: Lyndon B. Johnson.
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HEALTH
February 15, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
If I feel a canker sore coming on, I put a wad of chopped sauerkraut on the area, hold it there for a minute, then chew and swallow. I do this three or four times a day for two to three days. Trauma to the mouth from sharp food can trigger a canker sore (aphthous ulcer). So can immune suppression or a deficiency of folic acid, vitamin B-12 and iron. A 1930s remedy recommended swishing sauerkraut juice in the mouth several times a day. Perhaps the bacteria that ferment cabbage into sauerkraut provide helpful nutrients.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Germs and detectives might not seem like they're connected. But their link, as a certain fictitious sleuth might say, is elementary. In Thomas Goetz's fascinating and entertaining new page turner of a book, "The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis," we are transported to the final decades of the 19th century. The age of electricity was dawning. And in laboratories and on imaginary London streets, men armed with microscopes and the power of observation first used science to tackle the twin scourges of crime and disease.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
For those who need further evidence that you can't believe everything you see on TV, along comes the tale of a New Jersey man who says he sustained third-degree burns on his feet after following an insomnia remedy touted by Dr. Mehmet Oz on his daytime talk show. The remedy was a “heated rice footsie,” which the show's website describes like this: “Simply pour rice into your socks, heat them in the microwave until they're warm, then wear the socks for up to 20 minutes while lying in bed.” What good would that do, you ask?
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
We've all been there at some point, sitting in a restaurant ordering dinner when the waiter sneezes and mumbles an apologetic, "Sorry, I'm fighting a cold. " Why is he at work? Especially at a job that brings him close to other people? Maybe it is because he can't afford to miss the shift, something that a recently introduced Assembly bill could help remedy. AB 1522, introduced by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego), would require companies to provide a minimum of three days annual paid sick leave for any employee not covered by a collective bargaining agreement (which usually includes sick leave guarantees)
SPORTS
August 26, 2003 | Mike Penner
The first thing you need to know about "Playmakers," ESPN's latest foray into "original programming," is that it is better than the first foray, "A Season on the Brink" -- or, as it came to be unofficially subtitled, "Man, I Really Feel Sorry for Brian Dennehy." That's not quite a taped-and-splinted thumbs up. After "Brink" (rhymes with "stink"), ESPN original programming had nowhere to go but up, kind of like the Cincinnati Bengals before they drafted Carson Palmer.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | From Reuters
Health officials are calling for government-organized sex holidays as a cure for citizens worn down by the stress of modern life. "People suffering from stress should be given the opportunity of having sex holidays, when they would be able to forget their worries and concentrate on recuperating in an erotic atmosphere," according to a discussion paper produced by a Health Ministry working party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1995
A new CCC? Our limited speech patterns must improve! We need a "Civilian Conversation Corps" as one remedy. JOSEPH KRENGEL Santa Monica
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991
Alan Kishbaugh and the Mulholland community are entitled to see the entire wall along the public right of way taken down. Under city law, the construction permit for such a wall is revocable without cause. Modifying this intrusion into a vista is an inappropriate and inadequate remedy. The law permits the perfect remedy: take it down. LAURA LAKE Los Angeles
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Migraine disorder is an elephant in the room of medicine, says Dr. Andrew Charles, professor of neurology and director of the Headache Research and Treatment Program at UCLA. "All physicians - anybody in any kind of medical practice - knows how common headache and migraine are as a presenting complaint, and yet we don't really talk about it that much," he explains. Though migraine disorder affects 36 million Americans each year and is listed by the World Health Organization as the third most common disorder on the planet, it isn't well represented in medical school curricula.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla and Chad Terhune
Under fire for a shortage of Latino sign-ups for Obamacare, the state's health insurance exchange is looking for a booster shot from a well-established Southern California clinic chain. One recent weekday, Maria de Lourdes Martinez sat at a cubicle inside an AltaMed enrollment office in East Los Angeles browsing through the health plans available under the Affordable Care Act. Martinez, 49, of Rosemead, came to this strip-mall storefront across from a Starbucks because she'd brought her grandmother to an AltaMed clinic before.
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
We've all been there at some point, sitting in a restaurant ordering dinner when the waiter sneezes and mumbles an apologetic, "Sorry, I'm fighting a cold. " Why is he at work? Especially at a job that brings him close to other people? Maybe it is because he can't afford to miss the shift, something that a recently introduced Assembly bill could help remedy. AB 1522, introduced by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego), would require companies to provide a minimum of three days annual paid sick leave for any employee not covered by a collective bargaining agreement (which usually includes sick leave guarantees)
OPINION
January 14, 2014 | By Nan Aron
Imagine the Dodgers have just won the pennant and are going to play the Yankees in the World Series. But the rules have changed: All games will be played in Yankee Stadium. And there are new umpires, hired and paid by the Yankees. With rules like that, the Dodgers wouldn't stand much of a chance. Thanks to bad decisions by the Supreme Court and to unfair corporate practices, Americans are facing the same kinds of unfair rules. But this is no game. They may face those rules when they've been defrauded by a business or discriminated against by an employer.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Karyn Anastasio would have preferred staying in bed, ignoring the early onset of cold and darkness as she huddled in her apartment and watched TV. Instead, Anastasio and her friend, Christina Kaelberer, who also dreads winter, were walking through the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and listening to a tiny woman rave about the surroundings and emphasize how lovely they would be when ice covered the ponds, when white coated the ground, when the...
SPORTS
October 27, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
- In the year that the movie "42" dramatized the story of Jackie Robinson breaking baseball's color barrier, the number of African Americans playing in the World Series is the same as the number playing in the major leagues when Robinson made his debut in 1947: one. "It's sad to see," said Boston Red Sox outfielder Quintin Berry , the only African American on the roster of either team. The percentage of African Americans in the major leagues has declined from about 19% in 1984 to about 8% today.
REAL ESTATE
April 10, 1988
Sam Hall Kaplan's column was very heartening. We were promised the return of Angel's Flight. Please let us know how to remedy this loss. FLORIA LEEDS Los Angeles
NEWS
July 2, 1986
A Chinatown distributor was barred Tuesday under a court settlement from selling herbs and other products with claims that they can cure such diseases as cancer and diabetes or that they can restore sexual potence. Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner Bertrand D. Mouron signed a stipulated judgment under which SO's (U.S.A.) Co. Inc. and its president, Hoa-Thich Minh, agreed to pay $21,612 in civil penalties and legal costs to settle a consumer protection suit.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Don Lee
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - After two days of summit meetings here, President Obama and other world leaders signed a lengthy declaration of prescriptions for the global economy, including pledges that placed a renewed emphasis on creating jobs as opposed to curbing deficits. The so-called Group of 20 major economies also took further steps to crack down on multinational companies that avoid paying taxes. The 27-page joint statement from the G-20, which concluded its meetings Friday, underscored the shifting momentum in growth toward the U.S. and other advanced economies.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
In a filing on Friday, Apple Inc. fired back against a series of measures proposed by federal attorneys that would restrict the company's ability to strike electronic-book deals. Apple attorneys said the "injunction is a draconian and punitive intrusion into Apple's business, wildly out of proportion to any adjudicated wrongdoing or potential harm. Plaintiffs propose a sweeping and unprecedented injunction as a tool to empower the Government to regulate Apple's businesses and potentially affect Apple's business relationships with thousands of partners across several markets.
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