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Remission

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By David Zahniser
Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl said Thursday that his cancer is in remission, announcing on his YouTube channel that medical marijuana played a critical role in his survival. Rosendahl, who steps down June 30 after eight years in office, released a video saying he went through “five months of hell” and had been told initially he would not live past last November's election. Doctors diagnosed Rosendahl with Stage 4 cancer of the ureter in his pelvic area last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla, This post has been corrected. Please see below for details.
Valerie Harper, diagnosed with terminal brain cancer in January and given three to six months to live, has defied the odds and as of June was close to remission, the actress and her doctor revealed Thursday morning on the " Today " show. The 74-year-old "Rhoda" star, who went public with her diagnosis in March, has combined chemotherapy with Eastern options including acupuncture and Chinese tea. Harper has the rare condition leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, which occurs when cancer spreads to the fluid-filled membranes that surround the brain.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla, This post has been corrected. Please see below for details.
Valerie Harper, diagnosed with terminal brain cancer in January and given three to six months to live, has defied the odds and as of June was close to remission, the actress and her doctor revealed Thursday morning on the " Today " show. The 74-year-old "Rhoda" star, who went public with her diagnosis in March, has combined chemotherapy with Eastern options including acupuncture and Chinese tea. Harper has the rare condition leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, which occurs when cancer spreads to the fluid-filled membranes that surround the brain.
OPINION
July 7, 2013 | By Lawrence M. Krauss
No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish . - David Hume Last week the Vatican announced that a meeting of cardinals and bishops had ruled that the late Pope John Paul II was responsible for a second miracle, and thus the way was cleared for sainthood. The Congregation for the Causes of Saints decided he had cured a woman from Costa Rica in 2011 after a panel of doctors apparently ruled that her recovery was otherwise inexplicable.
OPINION
July 7, 2013 | By Lawrence M. Krauss
No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish . - David Hume Last week the Vatican announced that a meeting of cardinals and bishops had ruled that the late Pope John Paul II was responsible for a second miracle, and thus the way was cleared for sainthood. The Congregation for the Causes of Saints decided he had cured a woman from Costa Rica in 2011 after a panel of doctors apparently ruled that her recovery was otherwise inexplicable.
NEWS
July 8, 2009
Cancer vaccines: An article in Monday's Health section about vaccines used to fight cancer stated that the vaccine BiovaxID delayed remission of lymphoma in patients after chemotherapy by more than one year, on average. BiovaxID prolonged -- not delayed -- remission by more than one year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1985
William Raspberry's analogy (Editorial Pages, July 1) of civil rights and cancer was apropos. He concluded his column by stating: "The cancer on civil rights may be in remission, but I have no confidence that it has been cured." I am much less sanguine than the pessimistic Raspberry. Frankly, I can see no remission of this virulent condition, for we must remember that William Bradford Reynolds' actions are manifestations of Ronald Reagan's policy regarding civil rights. This policy is one of the principal reasons for the President's continuing popularity here at home and in South Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Veteran talk-show host Al Rantel, who has been absent from KABC-AM (790) since Jan. 14 to undergo treatment for lymphoma, said Friday that he would return to work May 27. In an appearance on "The Larry Elder Show," Rantel said chemotherapy had sent his cancer into remission. When he returns, he'll be heard weekdays from 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
NEWS
December 1, 1986
Four inmates escaped from the AIDS unit of Trenton State Prison by cutting through steel mesh covering a courtyard and scaling an 18-foot wall, but one was quickly captured, prison authorities in Trenton, N.J., said. A statewide manhunt was being conducted for the three still at large after the break-out over the weekend. State Corrections Commissioner Gary Hilton said that the escapees should be considered dangerous, although it was not known if they were armed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1998
Re "Cancer Drugs Face a Long Road From Mice to Men," May 6: I take exception to the comment by Dr. Philip DiScaia, "They (cancer patients) are desperate to find something that is an easy way out of a difficult situation." I'm the mother of a very brave young man who has battled Ewing's sarcoma (a rare bone cancer) through multiple and radical surgeries, various horribly long and toxic chemotherapy treatments, massive radiation sessions and months of hospitalizations, culminating with a stem-cell transplant at City of Hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By David Zahniser
Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl said Thursday that his cancer is in remission, announcing on his YouTube channel that medical marijuana played a critical role in his survival. Rosendahl, who steps down June 30 after eight years in office, released a video saying he went through “five months of hell” and had been told initially he would not live past last November's election. Doctors diagnosed Rosendahl with Stage 4 cancer of the ureter in his pelvic area last year.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A therapy that supercharges the body's immune cells and sends them back in to fight a deadly form of leukemia has shown promise in adult patients who were out of options, according to a new report published Wednesday. Adults who have relapsed after treatment for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia "have a dismal prognosis" a group from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center wrote in the journal Science Translational Medicine . But after undergoing the experimental therapy, four of five patients with relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia went into remission.
OPINION
March 6, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Robert Kennedy was a young Bill Rosendahl's hope for the White House, but Kennedy's rival, Hubert Humphrey, practiced the "happy warrior" style of politics that represents the principles Rosendahl has embraced. As he leaves the Los Angeles City Council after two terms, his eight years in office (and a diagnosis of cancer, now in remission) have not extinguished Rosendahl's cheerfulness, but they have given his warrior side an instruction booklet. He's crusaded for gay rights, for better care for the homeless and his fellow veterans, for mass transit.
HEALTH
July 13, 2009
Cancer vaccines: An article in the July 6 Health section about vaccines used to fight cancer stated that the vaccine BiovaxID delayed remission of lymphoma patients after chemotherapy by more than one year, on average. BiovaxID prolonged -- not delayed -- remission by more than one year.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | Ashley Halsey III, Halsey writes for the Washington Post.
For more than a decade as she raised two children, Sue Estes heard one story after another about how hospitals desperately needed nurses. They were getting signing bonuses, their pay was soaring to levels unheard of during Estes' years as a nurse, and bulging benefit packages included 401(k)s. This year, ready to return to work, she hears a different story. "I've shipped out resumes everywhere, and I'm not even getting the courtesy callbacks," said Estes, 43. "All my friends can't believe it. They've read the stories about the shortage, and they say, 'Places are begging for nurses!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Veteran talk-show host Al Rantel, who has been absent from KABC-AM (790) since Jan. 14 to undergo treatment for lymphoma, said Friday that he would return to work May 27. In an appearance on "The Larry Elder Show," Rantel said chemotherapy had sent his cancer into remission. When he returns, he'll be heard weekdays from 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A therapy that supercharges the body's immune cells and sends them back in to fight a deadly form of leukemia has shown promise in adult patients who were out of options, according to a new report published Wednesday. Adults who have relapsed after treatment for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia "have a dismal prognosis" a group from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center wrote in the journal Science Translational Medicine . But after undergoing the experimental therapy, four of five patients with relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia went into remission.
OPINION
September 9, 2007 | Matthew Dallek, Matthew Dallek is a fellow at the Alicia Patterson Foundation, which awards fellowships to journalists, and a cancer survivor.
Cancer annually kills about 560,000 Americans, and it remains the No. 1 killer of people under 85. Yet the leading 2008 presidential candidates, as in previous electoral cycles, have been relatively silent on how they would lead a fight against the disease. None of them has made research funding and treatment of the disease a signature issue despite the fact that cancer has affected nearly half of the candidates' lives. On the Democratic side, the breast cancer of former Sen.
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