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Remnants

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NATIONAL
July 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
About 300 people were evacuated from homes, campgrounds and a recreational vehicle park in the Ruidoso area after flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Dolly. Two people were reported missing. Meteorologists said that more than 6 inches of rain fell, and flash flood watches were in effect for central and eastern New Mexico. The Rio Ruidoso went over its banks around midnight, said Tom Schafer, Ruidoso's emergency management coordinator.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 22, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - As supporters cheered former President Hosni Mubarak's release from prison, Egypt's military-backed government pressed ahead with its crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood, taking steps to ban religious movements from forming political parties and weaken the influence of Islamic law on the constitution. The release of Mubarak on Thursday suggested that remnants of the police state he built during his 30 years in power were resurfacing two years after the autocrat was ousted in the "Arab Spring" uprising.
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NATIONAL
September 6, 2011
The remnants of Tropical Storm Lee threatened flooding from the Tennessee Valley to New England on Tuesday, while people in the storm's wake continued to face power outages and blocked roads. The National Weather Service issued flood and flash-flood watches and warnings from the Southern U.S. through the Appalachian Mountains and into the Northeast. Heavy rains will continue through Thursday, with 4 to 8 inches expected, though some areas could get as much as 10 inches. "These rains may cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides," the weather service said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2013 | By Thomas Curwen
Like an L.A. noir, this mystery begins with a mystery. I'm standing under the midday, midsummer sun. To the west, the skyscrapers of downtown rise like the steep palisades of a nearby island. The sky is cataract blue. I've parked next to a Buddhist temple and The One-Eye Gypsy bar and am walking east across the 1st Street bridge. Some people call it a viaduct, but it's a bridge to me, built in 1928 according to the commemorative plaque. Towers, like miniature Arc de Triomphes, rise from the bridge's abutments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000
Remnants of organic matter in soil collected in South Africa indicate that microorganisms had moved from the Earth's oceans onto land at least 2.6 billion years ago, according to researchers from Pennsylvania State University. Although life has been known to exist in the oceans for at least 3.8 billion years, the oldest known remnants on land, found in Arizona, were only 1.2 billion years old.
OPINION
December 19, 2001
The facade remnants of the New York City twin towers are being removed and preserved for the later creation of a memorial for those who perished on Sept. 11 (Dec. 16). Although New York City understandably needs such a remembrance, it is suggested that the nation needs to share in the memorial as well. Why couldn't fragments of the facade be cut into pieces for distribution to every state capital to demonstrate the scope of the national tragedy? Such a gesture by the people of New York City would give greater meaning to what happened to all Americans.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | United Press International
Former presidential candidate Louis Dejoie II was charged Thursday with provoking civil disorder, a crime punishable by life imprisonment, his lawyer said. Dejoie, arrested upon his arrival from Puerto Rico on Wednesday, was taken to the Port-au-Prince central court Thursday where he was formally charged.
BOOKS
October 7, 2001 | WILLIAM T. VOLLMANN, William T. Vollmann is the author of numerous books, including the three "Seven Dreams" novels, "The Ice-Shirt," "Fathers and Crows" and "The Rifles." His most recent novel, "The Royal Family," was awarded the Commonwealth Club's 2000 Silver Medal prize for fiction
A hundred years after William T. Vollmann was killed in a gun cleaning accident, I, William the Blind, received a commission to review the long novel "Argall," which marks the midpoint of his uncompleted "Seven Dreams" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"The Boyle Family will be featured in a one-man show," it says here in a press release. The man is Mark Boyle, who does not function alone but with Joan Hills and their children, Sebastian and Georgia Boyle. Well known in England where they served as representatives to the 1978 Venice Biennale and this year's Sao Paulo Biennale, the Boyles are making their Los Angeles debut with works from their "Journey to the Surfaces of the Earth."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1986 | RICHARD N. GOODWIN, Richard N. Goodwin is a writer and commentator in Concord, Mass.
The other night I watched the evening news companioned by my two youngest boys--ages 8 and 9--who were excitedly and prematurely in place for the Academy Awards--an annual children's show in which Hollywood recklessly uncurtains the fusion of the mercenary with the meretricious from which cinematic alchemy distills its illusions. And so, in an accident of scheduling, we watched together something that was no illusion at all: the intermittent detonation of warfare in the Gulf of Sidra.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
Some brittle and warped, others as smooth and flat as the day they left the processing shop, the 35-millimeter negatives trickle in to Xiao Ma's dank recycling depot in north Beijing, collected by a network of trash pickers. Stuffed into old rice bags and sugar sacks, they pile up nearly to the ceiling, along with X-rays, compact discs and other trash. Whether it's hospital film of a broken rib or a snapshot of a baby's first steps matters not; with the help of a little chemistry, Xiao Ma can turn both into cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Mary Adams Urashima crossed through the chain-link gate and stepped back in time. On this warm afternoon, the field was dry and rutted, a hint of the dump next door wafting through the breeze. The few buildings were tattered and filled with refuse, abused by time and vandals. But Urashima saw a wide-open lawn where the rich soil nourished harvests so bountiful that trains would cart away dozens of boxcars at a time. The ponds where goldfish and lily pads were raised. And over there, closer to the crimson farmhouse, the kitchen garden where a family grew vegetables and herbs.
WORLD
January 8, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
Even the police are driving Porsches. Chinese officials love their cars - big, fancy, expensive cars. A chocolate-colored Bentley worth $560,000 is cruising the streets of Beijing with license plates indicating it is registered to Zhongnanhai, the Communist Party headquarters. The armed police, who handle riots and crowd control, have the same model of Bentley in blue. And just in case it needs to go racing off to war, the Chinese army has a black Maserati that sells in China for $330,000.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2011
The remnants of Tropical Storm Lee threatened flooding from the Tennessee Valley to New England on Tuesday, while people in the storm's wake continued to face power outages and blocked roads. The National Weather Service issued flood and flash-flood watches and warnings from the Southern U.S. through the Appalachian Mountains and into the Northeast. Heavy rains will continue through Thursday, with 4 to 8 inches expected, though some areas could get as much as 10 inches. "These rains may cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides," the weather service said.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Stephen Ceasar and David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
The Southern states that first felt the lash of Hurricane Irene exhaled and heavily populated New Jersey and New York City cautiously began a return to routine, but the pain was just beginning for parts of upstate New York and New England, where rivers leaped their banks and raged through towns, trapping an unknown number of people in floods. In Vermont, where soil was already saturated from a wet spring and soaking rains, rescue teams stymied by torrential floodwaters were unable to reach stranded residents in towns along the Winooski River, including the capital, Montpelier.
WORLD
November 24, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Mexican authorities Wednesday announced they had arrested the new leader of the drug gang formerly run by suspected kingpin Edgar "La Barbie" Valdez Villarreal. The arrest late Tuesday of Carlos Montemayor marked a fresh blow against the remnants of the once-formidable Beltran Leyva gang, battered by arrests, deaths and vicious internal fighting. Mexican federal police said Montemayor took over the faction once led by Valdez, a U.S. citizen arrested in August. The in-fighting has stoked months of killings and beheadings across the states of Morelos and Guerrero, home to the resort city of Acapulco.
REAL ESTATE
October 8, 1989 | RUTH RYON and Jack Smith, Times Staff Writer
His client was a movie director, realtor Jack Hupp said, and was adamant about living in Beverly Hills. The film maker had found a house he liked, Hupp said, but was so concerned that it have a Beverly Hills address that he made it a contingency in his offer. Hupp discovered to his alarm that the house was not within the city limits of Beverly Hills, but found with some quick checking that it was in the Beverly Hills Post Office area, which means that it has a Beverly Hills mailing address.
WORLD
July 19, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The hottest video rental in this beachside resort town isn't some action-packed Hollywood blockbuster, but "Brigada," a Russian miniseries about a bunch of army buddies who form an organized crime syndicate before they're rubbed out by a group of younger, more unscrupulous rivals. The Russian influence here is also visible in shop signs using the Cyrillic alphabet and Russian flags hanging outside stores just down the street from Starbucks. "We've had good relations with the Russians for a long time," said Nikos Andreo, a 57-year-old wine grower in Limassol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
When the landmark Long Beach bookstore Acres of Books closed its doors in 2008 to make way for a city redevelopment project, a big question remained: what to do with its acres of bookshelves? The decision was made to let them live on in a way, even after the bookstore was long gone. This summer, workers are using hammers to knock down and harvest an estimated 6-1/2 miles of wooden shelving. Most of the 1930s-era building will be demolished this fall to make way for an art center.
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