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BUSINESS
May 22, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Amid all the ballyhoo over what a bold visionary Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is, let's pause for a moment to appreciate the work of Eugene Polley, inventor of the TV remote control, who has died at age 96. Think about it. Before Polley's brainstorm, people actually had to get up out of their seats and cross the room to change TV channels. Simply put, there would be no couch potatoes without this man. I don't mean to be snarky. The TV remote truly is one of those rare devices that change the way we live . I'd put it right up there with personal computers and microwave ovens.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
With the addition of Amazon Fire TV this week, the market for video-streaming devices is getting crowded. And maybe that's why Roku made its latest device so small. The Saratoga, Calif., company recently began shipping the Streaming Stick, a video-streaming dongle that users can discreetly plug into their HDTVs to access online video services such as Netflix, HBO Go and Pandora. Measuring 3.1 inches by 1.1 inches and just 0.5 inch tall, the Streaming Stick takes up a lot less space than Roku's other devices, which resemble hockey pucks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Alaska Airlines jet arriving from Mexico was evacuated Monday because no one claimed a "suspicious item" -- later determined to be a toy transmitter -- spotted by a crew member, officials said. Authorities using bomb-sniffing dogs found no explosives inside the plane's cargo hold or the transmitter, which was similar to a remote control for a toy car or plane, authorities said. Airport police were notified at 8:20 a.m.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you like remote-controlled cars and insects, you may want to invest in RoboRoach. A startup company called Backyard Brains , which sells neuroscience experiment kits to students, has taken to Kickstarter, seeking $10,000 in funding to mass manufacture devices that would let users control the movements of live cockroaches. "This is the world's first commercially available cyborg," the project developers say. PHOTOS: Last minute Father's Day gift idea: Tablets under $200 The device, which resembles a small logic board with a computer chip, is placed on the cockroach like a backpack.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | Associated Press
A Russian cosmonaut aboard the international space station had to bring in a cargo ship by remote control Friday night after an automatic system failed. Yuri Gidzenko used a joystick to guide the Russian Progress ship to a safe linkup with the space station, almost an hour later than planned. It was the first Progress docking for the three-man station crew, on board for just two weeks.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Simplify. That was what designer Doug Patton set out to do in developing a new television remote control for Mitsubishi Electronics America Inc. in Cypress. The result is a design marvel. Called the PRM-1, the $29.95 device is a pen-shaped remote control with only three buttons that can accomplish the most frequently used functions.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | RAY FRAGER, THE BALTIMORE SUN and Frager , an assistant sports editor for The Baltimore Sun , writes on the sports media
Into the Great Remote Control Debate, let me throw another factor: genetics. You may have observed that the preponderance of persons using remote controls to alight from television channel to television channel like the leading man who goes from bed to bed in one of those Italian farces where the mouths are never in sync with the dialogue. Well, I am here to tell you we cannot help it. In my home, there are two males and two females.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1997 | (James S. Granelli)
Universal Electronics Inc., an Ohio company that makes universal remote controls for televisions and other electronics products, said Friday that it will move its headquarters to its Orange County technical center. Universal has 72 employees at its research and development center in Cypress and expects to add about 40 headquarters staff, mostly transferring workers from its current home in Twinsburg, southeast of Cleveland.
SPORTS
October 15, 1994 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a day when marriages, couch cushions and TV remote controls will be tested like never before. A day created by a college football scheduling quirk that features nine key games involving 14 teams ranked in the top 25, many of them playing each other. Not only is there quantity, there's quality, the kind that will help determine which teams win what conference titles, which teams go to what bowls and which one finishes with a national championship.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Howard Rosenberg is The Times' television critic
This is it. This is my goodbye column. Goodbye to the old millennium. Bags packed. Headed out the door. Traveling light. Just me . . . and my remote control device. It's all I need, all I ever needed. Everything else was extraneous. With my remote control, I controlled the world. From any position, too: sitting, standing, reclining on the couch. Why, I could raise or lower the volume with my back to the set at 20 paces. With my remote control in my hand, I had it all.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | By Jon Healey, Los Angeles Times
A new pay-TV receiver from Fanhattan tries to solve three problems vexing TV viewers: clunky program guides, a proliferation of often similar Internet video services and overly complex remote controls. The new receiver, dubbed Fan TV, uses its own image-rich menus in place of the grid of channels and time slots on conventional pay-TV guides. It combines broadcast and cable networks with Netflix, Apple's iTunes and numerous other online video sources. And it's much sleeker than conventional set-top boxes.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2013 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- Investigators believe that the two homemade bombs used in the Boston Marathon blasts were triggered by long-range remote controls for toy cars. A joint FBI and Department of Homeland Security intelligence bulletin sent to state and local law enforcement Tuesday night said the bombs likely included components taken from remote-controlled toy cars, and were more sophisticated than previously believed. After combing the blast sites on Boylston Street for evidence, investigators have finished a preliminary reconstruction of the bombs that killed three people and injured more than 260 runners and bystanders near the finish line of the Patriots Day race on April 15. FULL COVERAGE: Boston Marathon attack “Based on preliminary analysis of recovered evidence, each device likely incorporated an electrical fusing system using components from remote control toy cars such as a transmitter and receiver pair operating at 2.4 GHz, an electronic speed control used as the switch mechanism and sub-C rechargeable battery packs at the power source,” read the bulletin, according to an official.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
“AAA says smartphones may soon replace traditional car keys.” Wow, it's like an episode from “The Twilight Zone.” On Monday, I found someone's car keys on my lawn, and then on Tuesday, there's this story. As my colleague Jerry Hirsch wrote on the Highway 1 blog: The metal car key is fast disappearing, replaced by “smart” electronic car keys and fobs.  Now AAA says it expects smart keys to be transitional technology, soon to be replaced by people's phones. Darn!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Smack in the middle of Los Angeles, feasting on deer and roaming the chaparral-covered slopes, a mountain lion prowls Griffith Park. Yes, there had been sporadic rumors over the years of the 140-pound beasts lurking in the shadows of populated hillsides near the park's attractions, but wildlife biologists had discounted them because of the improbability of the animals crossing the freeways to get there. For the first time, however, scientists now have photographic evidence of a lion inhabiting the park.
SPORTS
August 6, 2012 | By David Wharton
LONDON -- They're not very big, but they certainly are amusing. In events such as the hammer throw and discus, track and field staff has taken to ferrying the implements back to their throwers by way of remote-controlled cars. At the 2012 London Olympics, they are using miniature versions of Mini hatchbacks, built to 1/4 scale. According to BMW, each car can carry about 17 pounds, the equivalent of one hammer, one discus or two javelins. There are three cars working in four-hour shifts, each traveling about 6,000 meters per day. They zip around the infield in circles and dashes.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Amid all the ballyhoo over what a bold visionary Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is, let's pause for a moment to appreciate the work of Eugene Polley, inventor of the TV remote control, who has died at age 96. Think about it. Before Polley's brainstorm, people actually had to get up out of their seats and cross the room to change TV channels. Simply put, there would be no couch potatoes without this man. I don't mean to be snarky. The TV remote truly is one of those rare devices that change the way we live . I'd put it right up there with personal computers and microwave ovens.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2000 | MICHAEL STROH, BALTIMORE SUN
"Today on Oprah . . . " Click. " . . . the courts in Florida must decide whether a hanging chad . . . " Click. "Yo! Wazzzzup . . . " Click. "The clicker," "the zapper," "the changer"--whatever we choose to call it, the television remote is the granddaddy of all gadgets, as indispensable to the family room as the TV itself. It has been blamed for ballooning waistlines, shrinking attention spans and strained relationships. And this year the remote control is 50 years old.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Simplify. That was what designer Doug Patton set out to do in developing a new television remote control for Mitsubishi Electronics America Inc. in Cypress. The result is a design marvel. Called the PRM-1, it is a pen-shaped remote control with only three buttons that can accomplish the most-frequently used functions.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Can Ikea's new Uppleva system solve our collective television problem? For too long we've been juggling too many remote controls, shoving unsightly tangles of electric cords behind bookshelves, and precariously stacking video game players on top of Blu-ray players on top of cable boxes. It's not pretty. It's not convenient. And it's not easy. But now Ikea has announced a new product designed to clear the clutter associated with watching television. They call it Uppleva.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Are you struggling with a multiremote system at home? Do you wish you could control your television, DVR and DVD player with one single remote that wouldn't be a pain to program? Do you think that remote should be your iPhone? Then get psyched: On Thursday Patently Apple turned up a patent filed by Apple that shows the company is hard at work designing the remote control of your dreams. Apple's patent, which the company filed in the third quarter of 2010, would allow you to take a picture of an existing piece of electronic equipment - your television for example, and send it to the iCloud, where Apple would determine the type of device you want to control as well as the make and the model of that device.
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