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Remotely Piloted Vehicles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2008 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
To the world it might be called a robot boat, but its proper name is the Unmanned Surface Vehicle, and the U.S. Navy expects it to be a major tool in countering what officials believe is a growing threat posed by quiet diesel-powered submarines owned by rogue nations. In advance of the official roll-out today, reporters were allowed to see the boat on Thursday at Naval Base Point Loma before it took a trial run on San Diego Bay.
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WORLD
October 25, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Air Force has begun using armed drones to strike targets in southern Iraq, the military's top officer said. The pilotless Predators fly in conjunction with Air Force fighter jets that have been patrolling a "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq for more than a decade, said Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Predators have detected Iraqi gunners firing surface-to-air missiles or artillery, Myers said.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An unmanned plane that set an altitude record two years ago broke apart during a test flight and crashed into the Pacific Ocean. The flight was testing an advanced experimental fuel system in preparation for an endurance mission of almost two days that had been planned for next month. The $15-million, solar-electric, propeller-driven Helios had a wingspan of 247 feet. It reached an altitude of 96,500 feet during a 2001 flight from Barking Sands missile range in Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troy Turley learned an important lesson Saturday afternoon: It is a lot easier to fly his radio-controlled helicopter in his own back yard than in front of a panel of poker-faced judges. With shaky hands maneuvering the controls, Turley tried to hover the small aircraft steadily before lowering it onto a small landing pad at Mile Square Regional Park, the site of the 1994 West Coast International Radio Control Helicopter Championships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1992 | PAUL JACOBS and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Assembly on Monday joined a wave of protest against the decision by Los Angeles County transportation officials to construct a high-tech, driverless rail system and to award the contract to the Japanese-owned Sumitomo Corp. of America. Pointing to rising unemployment in California, the Assembly voted 70 to 0 to urge that the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission withdraw its approval of the $121.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1992
In reading the article "Private Sector Aids Condors' Release" (Aug. 23), I was very disappointed to find the name of my own company, Seneca Resources (a division of Natural Fuel Gas), had been overlooked. In 1987 Seneca learned that the overhead power lines that fueled our operations threatened the soaring paths of the California condors and therefore threatened the release project as a whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angrily shunning doubts expressed by the builder and eventual operator of the Metro Green Line, the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission voted 7-4 Wednesday to affirm the use of driverless cars on the 23-mile system despite rising costs and technical difficulties. The commission, after months of heavy lobbying, also chose Sumitomo Corp. of America to build the cars and Union Switch & Signal for the train controls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $1.5-million experimental pilotless plane, one of only two of its kind, started to break apart during a test flight 33,000 feet over the Antelope Valley on Tuesday afternoon and dropped to the ground by parachute--perhaps damaged beyond repair, a NASA spokesman said.
SCIENCE
October 11, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA has built and flown a remote-controlled plane powered from the ground by the beam of an invisible laser. In indoor flights conducted last month at a NASA center in Alabama, the plane flew lap after lap, gliding to a landing once the laser beam was turned off, the agency said Thursday. While in flight, the laser tracked the 11-ounce, 5-foot-wingspan plane, striking the photovoltaic cells that powered the tiny motor that turned its lone propeller.
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