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Remotely Piloted Vehicles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angrily shunning doubts expressed by the builder and eventual operator of the Metro Green Line, the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission voted 7-4 Wednesday to affirm the use of driverless cars on the 23-mile system despite rising costs and technical difficulties. The commission, after months of heavy lobbying, also chose Sumitomo Corp. of America to build the cars and Union Switch & Signal for the train controls.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $1.5-million experimental pilotless plane, one of only two of its kind, started to break apart during a test flight 33,000 feet over the Antelope Valley on Tuesday afternoon and dropped to the ground by parachute--perhaps damaged beyond repair, a NASA spokesman said.
SCIENCE
October 11, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA has built and flown a remote-controlled plane powered from the ground by the beam of an invisible laser. In indoor flights conducted last month at a NASA center in Alabama, the plane flew lap after lap, gliding to a landing once the laser beam was turned off, the agency said Thursday. While in flight, the laser tracked the 11-ounce, 5-foot-wingspan plane, striking the photovoltaic cells that powered the tiny motor that turned its lone propeller.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2004 | From Associated Press
NASA said it was launching a program that could have robotic planes and conventionally piloted aircraft routinely and safely sharing civil airspace by 2008. Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, are now limited primarily to restricted test or military airspace. Industry association UAV National Industry Team, the Department of Defense and the Federal Aviation Administration are participating in the program, which aims to deliver to the FAA proposals for sharing airspace.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. said it would stop research and development on its Little Bird unmanned aircraft in favor of a newer program. Little Bird, an update of a utility helicopter used in Vietnam, is an older technology that had largely been funded by Boeing. The company instead will focus on its new unmanned aircraft, the A160 Hummingbird, which has received more government funds, Boeing said this week.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The executive director of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission last week quietly signed a $128-million contract authorizing a Japanese firm to build a driverless train, despite mounting pressure from local politicians to block the contract, it was disclosed Wednesday. Calling the action "sneaky and outrageous," Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky said LACTC Executive Director Neil Peterson signed the contract with Sumitomo Corp. on Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1997 | TOM BECKER
Baseball bats and pizza pies will fly in the skies over Sepulveda Basin on Sunday. Well, not really. The bats and pizzas are just some of the many unusual designs of remote control aircraft that will put on a stunt show at the third annual Ronald McDonald House Fun Fly. All proceeds from the event, sponsored by the Valley Flyers Radio Control Aircraft Club, go to the Ronald McDonald House of Los Angeles. Last year, the group collected about $1,500 for the house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state assemblyman and the chairman of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission agreed Friday to try to scrap a highly controversial contract with a foreign firm to build a driverless transit line from Norwalk to El Segundo. But the proposal apparently lacks enough support among the commission's board members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pilotless, $4.9-million airplane funded by NASA was blown apart at 19,000 feet on a test flight at Edwards Air Force Base on Tuesday when it went out of control, officials said, causing at least the third such loss in two years. Fearing that the aircraft, dubbed Theseus, would veer out of the test area, ground-based operators destroyed it by remote control, said John Langford, president of Aurora Flight Systems, which built the lightweight plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Union Pacific Railroad has delivered two remote-controlled freight trains here despite concerns by railroad engineers, who cited numerous accidents and deaths caused by the technology. The trains, used in switching yards to move railroad cars and link up trains, are moved with a control panel worn around the neck. Engineers aboard a locomotive traditionally control a train's movement.
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