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Remotely Piloted Vehicles

BUSINESS
September 8, 1992
In reading the article "Private Sector Aids Condors' Release" (Aug. 23), I was very disappointed to find the name of my own company, Seneca Resources (a division of Natural Fuel Gas), had been overlooked. In 1987 Seneca learned that the overhead power lines that fueled our operations threatened the soaring paths of the California condors and therefore threatened the release project as a whole.
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NEWS
May 25, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The sun still hung low in the east Sunday when the Marsokhod stood ready to climb on its own. This spot in the Mojave Desert seemed right for a test run. It bears an uncanny resemblance to photographs taken by the pair of Viking lander craft that visited the Red Planet in 1975. The 150-foot rise was strewn with lava boulders and stones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER
Jimmy Chu was nervous moments before the Anaheim Union High School District's first "Top Gun" competition for propane-powered model airplanes began Friday at Savanna High School. The Magnolia High senior was the lead designer of his school's plane, which was about to fly in the two-school competition against a plane from archrival Savanna. He said he was more apprehensive than he was before big games as a member of the football team.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As soon as the operator's words boomed across the control room--"Gate alarm!"--they were echoed by the safety officer with an additional, critical detail: "Gate alarm at New Westminster!" Somebody had jumped a gate at the New Westminster station of the SkyTrain driverless train system, alighting on the tracks. Computers swiftly closed the station and de-energized the rails to avoid electrocuting the intruder.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The executive director of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission last week quietly signed a $128-million contract authorizing a Japanese firm to build a driverless train, despite mounting pressure from local politicians to block the contract, it was disclosed Wednesday. Calling the action "sneaky and outrageous," Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky said LACTC Executive Director Neil Peterson signed the contract with Sumitomo Corp. on Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1992 | PAUL JACOBS and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Assembly on Monday joined a wave of protest against the decision by Los Angeles County transportation officials to construct a high-tech, driverless rail system and to award the contract to the Japanese-owned Sumitomo Corp. of America. Pointing to rising unemployment in California, the Assembly voted 70 to 0 to urge that the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission withdraw its approval of the $121.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state assemblyman and the chairman of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission agreed Friday to try to scrap a highly controversial contract with a foreign firm to build a driverless transit line from Norwalk to El Segundo. But the proposal apparently lacks enough support among the commission's board members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebuffing Mayor Tom Bradley after a loud and heated exchange of words, the Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to ask county transportation commissioners to once again reconsider the use of driverless cars on the Metro Green Line. The council also asked the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission to rethink its controversial decision to buy Japanese cars for that line--a decision that drew an emotional response in light of stubborn local unemployment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angrily shunning doubts expressed by the builder and eventual operator of the Metro Green Line, the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission voted 7-4 Wednesday to affirm the use of driverless cars on the 23-mile system despite rising costs and technical difficulties. The commission, after months of heavy lobbying, also chose Sumitomo Corp. of America to build the cars and Union Switch & Signal for the train controls.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | NANCY JO HILL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A camouflage-colored C-130 sat on the runway. Its four engines were silent, but an armored tank had just rolled out of its cargo bay. Down the runway sat a Pitts S2-A, a vintage biplane known for its acrobatic maneuvers. Its distinctive red and white paint gleamed in the sun. Even though these planes are just as airworthy as their full-size counterparts, they are only a fraction of the size. The C-130 has a wing span of 135 inches. The Pitts has a 68-inch wing span.
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