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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999
Author and children's books illustrator Remy Charlip ("Harlequin") will teach a seven-week master class for teens at the Junior Arts Center at Barnsdall Art Park, on Sundays beginning Saturday. The class is held in conjunction with an exhibition of Charlip's artworks at the Junior Arts Center Gallery. For more information on class times and enrollment, call the Junior Arts Center at (213) 485-4474.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999
Author and children's books illustrator Remy Charlip ("Harlequin") will teach a seven-week master class for teens at the Junior Arts Center at Barnsdall Art Park, on Sundays beginning Saturday. The class is held in conjunction with an exhibition of Charlip's artworks at the Junior Arts Center Gallery. For more information on class times and enrollment, call the Junior Arts Center at (213) 485-4474.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Teasing and flouncing, rhyming and jiving, the ragtag crowd of children in Donald McKayle's "Games" conjure up a perpetual-motion street scene from a more innocent age. As performed Friday night in Campus Theatre at El Camino College by Los Angeles Contemporary Dance Theater, the 1951 work came across with its spirited energy firmly intact. A cappella traditional ditties sung by Forrest Gardner and Flo Lyle--who observe the passing scene from a re-creation of Paul Bertelsen's original skeletal brick house set--are taken up by the dancers, whose sidewalk activities begin in sheer fun and end in the pursuit of one of the girls by a much-feared, unseen policeman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Teasing and flouncing, rhyming and jiving, the ragtag crowd of children in Donald McKayle's "Games" conjure up a perpetual-motion street scene from a more innocent age. As performed Friday night in Campus Theatre at El Camino College by Los Angeles Contemporary Dance Theater, the 1951 work came across with its spirited energy firmly intact. A cappella traditional ditties sung by Forrest Gardner and Flo Lyle--who observe the passing scene from a re-creation of Paul Bertelsen's original skeletal brick house set--are taken up by the dancers, whose sidewalk activities begin in sheer fun and end in the pursuit of one of the girls by a much-feared, unseen policeman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Remy Charlip isn't used to portraying anybody on stage but himself. However, in the small theater at the Museum of Contemporary Art, the veteran choreographer, dancer, artist and author is rehearsing the title role of Amaterasu--a mythic Japanese sun goddess--in a new quasi-operatic theater piece opening tonight at MOCA. But, after sashaying down a steep ramp with the hauteur of a petulant Tallulah Bankhead, he interrupts his drag impersonation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
San Francisco-area modern dancer June Watanabe impressed with amplitude, ease and integrity of movement in a solo recital Friday at El Camino College. She developed witty, mysterious connections between the fixed points provided by Remy Charlip's whimsical drawings of dancing figures in "Red Towel Dance" (to pianist Robert Haag's prosaic account of parts of Bach's "Goldberg Variations").
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remy Charlip's biography lists achievements as modern dancer, choreographer, stage director, set designer, plus a separate career as children's book author and illustrator. A sense of serious whimsy links many of these pursuits and it loomed large on Sunday in the San Francisco-based Charlip's retrospective program "Books Into Theater, Theater Into Books" at the Mark Taper Auditorium of the L.A. Central Library downtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL
The 50-year partnership between composer John Cage and choreographer Merce Cunningham redefined the possibilities for music and dance by questioning nearly all the basic assumptions about those arts. Elliot Caplan's 1991 film "Cage/Cunningham" honors their innovations by adopting many of their methods in its style and structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was far more than a trip down memory lane when 32 dancers spoke about their lives in "The Horse's Mouth Greets the New Millennium" Saturday at the Japan America Theatre. Sure, every 90-second anecdote in this "live documentary" created by Tina Croll and James Cunningham revealed an interesting part of the dancers' lives, sometimes hilariously, sometimes touchingly. We got to know, appreciate and embrace them more and in a different way than when they danced later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Among the burning issues facing our society, nobody up to now, it seems, has set a high priority on the plight of certain young Asian-American women: the ones with too exaggerated a notion of their own bruised sensitivity and too much guilt over all the new clothes in their closets.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Remy Charlip isn't used to portraying anybody on stage but himself. However, in the small theater at the Museum of Contemporary Art, the veteran choreographer, dancer, artist and author is rehearsing the title role of Amaterasu--a mythic Japanese sun goddess--in a new quasi-operatic theater piece opening tonight at MOCA. But, after sashaying down a steep ramp with the hauteur of a petulant Tallulah Bankhead, he interrupts his drag impersonation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
While the Museum of Contemporary Art's yearlong inaugural show offered painting and sculpture only, its next effort, beginning Tuesday, serves up a smorgasbord of mixed media. "In marked contrast to our inaugural exhibition (Individuals: A Selected History of Contemporary Art, 1945-1986), we now have six shows characterized by a diversity of media: architecture, drawing, video, video installation and performance art," said MOCA assistant curator Elizabeth Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 'Piss Christ' Sells High: While the art-world furor continues over a controversial Virgin Mary portrait, one of 10 prints of "Piss Christ," a photo of a crucifix immersed in urine that caused its own furor in the 1980s, fetched a whopping $43,700 at Christie's Tuesday, far surpassing the New York auction house's presale estimate of $15,000 to $25,000.
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