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Ren Wanding

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NEWS
January 27, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wang Dan, the top student leader of China's 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations, was sentenced Saturday to four years imprisonment, official Chinese news media reported. The Beijing Intermediate People's Court also imposed a sentence of seven years on veteran activist Ren Wanding, who spoke at the massive Tian An Men Square protests in the spring of 1989 despite having previously endured four years imprisonment for helping lead a late-1970s democracy movement.
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NEWS
September 2, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years ago, underground newspaper editor Wei Jingsheng, the most famous pro-democracy activist in China, was arrested and sentenced to 15 years' imprisonment. Wei disappeared into China's secretive prison and labor-camp system. Over the intervening years, only the sketchiest of reports have surfaced about his whereabouts and physical condition. Human rights organizations protested the treatment of Wei, but he was largely forgotten in the West.
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NEWS
September 2, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years ago, underground newspaper editor Wei Jingsheng, the most famous pro-democracy activist in China, was arrested and sentenced to 15 years' imprisonment. Wei disappeared into China's secretive prison and labor-camp system. Over the intervening years, only the sketchiest of reports have surfaced about his whereabouts and physical condition. Human rights organizations protested the treatment of Wei, but he was largely forgotten in the West.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wang Dan, the top student leader of China's 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations, was sentenced Saturday to four years imprisonment, official Chinese news media reported. The Beijing Intermediate People's Court also imposed a sentence of seven years on veteran activist Ren Wanding, who spoke at the massive Tian An Men Square protests in the spring of 1989 despite having previously endured four years imprisonment for helping lead a late-1970s democracy movement.
NEWS
June 9, 1996 | Reuters
China released veteran dissident Ren Wanding on Sunday after he spent seven years in prison for his role in 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations. He was taken to an undisclosed location in northern China. While in prison, Ren suffered from cataracts, chronic hemorrhaging and other illnesses, human rights groups say. "He's weak but his health seems OK," his wife, Zhang Fengying, said Sunday.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | Times Wire Services
China has begun prosecution procedures against a prominent human rights activist and at least 10 students among the leaders of last year's democracy movement, with long prison terms looming for those convicted, Chinese sources said Wednesday. The sources said activist Ren Wanding and the students were formally arrested in recent weeks and are among hundreds of detainees at Qincheng Prison. Government agencies declined to respond to inquiries on the detainees.
NEWS
November 16, 1989
More than 40 leaders of last spring's democracy movement now detained at a maximum-security prison outside Beijing are to be tried for counterrevolutionary crimes, the most serious political charges in China, Chinese sources said Wednesday. According to the sources, those to stand trial include student leader Wang Dan, former top government policy adviser Cao Siyuan and veteran human rights activist Ren Wanding.
NEWS
September 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
Chinese police interrogated three dissidents in separate, three-hour sessions and warned them not to try to set up an opposition political party, one of those interrogated said today. Ren Wanding, one of the dissident community's most prominent figures, said his Thursday night detention and questioning persuaded him to give up plans to register the China Democracy Party's Beijing branch. Police "told me, 'Now we're still under the Communist Party's leadership.
NEWS
September 10, 1992
It is unfortunate that The Times has implied ("China to Release More Information on Jailed Dissidents," Aug. 27) that China's political dissidents receive humane treatment in prison, that the official information released to John Kamm is, in fact, accurate, and that Chinese videotapes and photographs are proof positive of prisoner well-being. The Chinese first released photographs of allegedly healthy political prisoners in May.
OPINION
February 3, 1991
Are China's authorities getting soft on political crime? Yes and no--mostly no. By Chinese standards, recent sentences meted out to dissidents who participated in the 1989 Tian An Mien Square demonstrations were lenient. Punishment for "counter revolutionary propaganda and incitement" included a four-year prison term for student leader Wang Dan, 23, who was No. 1 on the government's most wanted list of student activists. The government said his sentence was light because he showed "repentance."
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under increasing U.S. pressure to demonstrate progress on human rights, Chinese officials on Tuesday showed reporters videotapes of four prominent dissidents celebrating with their families in prison. The brief tapes, intended to show that the prisoners are in good health and being treated humanely, included footage of 1989 democracy movement leaders Chen Ziming, Wang Juntao, Ren Wanding and Liu Gang.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001 | PHILIP J. CUNNINGHAM, Philip J. Cunningham, a teacher at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, covered the 1989 Tiananmen crackdown for the BBC
Tiananmen 1989 was a struggle for the hearts and minds of the people, a struggle that continues. Wang Dan, now in exile in the U.S., has earned much respect for his willingness to reexamine his own involvement as a student leader in 1989. In April of this year he came up with the formula that "the students were wrong, but the government was criminal."
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