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Rena Inoue

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January 18, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Rena Inoue had five stitches in her left knee, souvenir of a crash into the boards while landing a throw triple loop, and a grimace on her face. But after a series of terrible and often terrifying performances scrambled the standings Friday, she and her partner, John Baldwin Jr., had a bronze medal at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships and a berth at the World Championships. That made the Santa Monica couple's pain more bearable.
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SPORTS
February 2, 2008 | Helene Elliott
It wasn't part of their routine, and Rena Inoue was puzzled. She and John Baldwin were taking their bows last Saturday after their finale at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, waving to the crowd as they had done hundreds of times. But when she turned to face another section of St. Paul's Xcel Energy Center, Baldwin wasn't beside her. He was down on one knee, reaching for her hands. "I thought at first he was tired or something," Inoue said. "I was looking at him like, 'What's going on?'
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SPORTS
February 8, 2006 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Rena Inoue hadn't felt good for a while. It was 1998, and she'd developed a cough, a persistent one that rattled her 4-foot-10, 95-pound frame. "And I noticed I got tired easily, much more than I should," said Inoue, who grew up in Japan and had been dispatched to Lake Arrowhead by her country's figure skating federation in 1996 to further her career. "I thought I had pneumonia or something, so I went to the doctor and checked it."
SPORTS
January 23, 2007 | Helene Elliott
John Baldwin remembers walking to a nightclub near the hotel where he and partner Rena Inoue were staying last month during the Grand Prix figure skating final in St. Petersburg, Russia. Inoue, tired after their exhibition performance and wary of venturing beyond the hotel, remained in their room while Baldwin and another skater went out with two women they had met during the competition. The group was together about an hour, until he went to search for a restroom.
SPORTS
January 14, 2006 | Bill Plaschke
Leave it to the L.A. guy, the one with the blond hair and bare chest, to celebrate skating history as if it were beach volleyball. Shortly after John Baldwin threw and twirled Rena Inoue from here to Turin, he shouted and pumped his fist at her. Then he made out with her. At center ice. "C'mon, I've kissed her before," Baldwin said. "But never, ever on the lips in public," his father, John Sr., said.
SPORTS
February 2, 2008 | Helene Elliott
It wasn't part of their routine, and Rena Inoue was puzzled. She and John Baldwin were taking their bows last Saturday after their finale at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, waving to the crowd as they had done hundreds of times. But when she turned to face another section of St. Paul's Xcel Energy Center, Baldwin wasn't beside her. He was down on one knee, reaching for her hands. "I thought at first he was tired or something," Inoue said. "I was looking at him like, 'What's going on?'
SPORTS
January 11, 2006 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Nami Nari Nam refused to be a victim. As a 4-foot-8, 82-pound bundle of energy and charm, the Irvine resident was 13 when she captivated figure skating fans and finished second at the 1999 U.S. championships. She placed eighth in 2000, seemingly a minor setback, but the pain that developed in her hip that summer launched her on a painful and disheartening path. She initially was told she had a fracture in her growth plate; later, that she had torn cartilage in her hip and would need surgery.
SPORTS
January 23, 2007 | Helene Elliott
John Baldwin remembers walking to a nightclub near the hotel where he and partner Rena Inoue were staying last month during the Grand Prix figure skating final in St. Petersburg, Russia. Inoue, tired after their exhibition performance and wary of venturing beyond the hotel, remained in their room while Baldwin and another skater went out with two women they had met during the competition. The group was together about an hour, until he went to search for a restroom.
SPORTS
February 13, 2006 | Helene Elliott
Tatiana Totmianina and Maxim Marinin are poised to extend the Olympic winning streak of Soviet or Russian pairs to 11, ranking first entering today's finale. Zhang Dan and Zhang Hao of China are second, followed by Maria Petrova and Alexei Tikhonov of Russia. U.S. champions Rena Inoue and John Baldwin of Santa Monica are sixth but within reach of a medal if they again land a throw triple axel, a difficult move only they have landed in competition. -- Helene Elliott
SPORTS
March 14, 2005 | Helene Elliott
Rena Inoue and John Baldwin Jr. of Santa Monica, who won the 2004 U.S. pairs title and finished second this year, reluctantly followed their coach, Jill Watson, when she moved to Arizona a few months ago. Unhappy in their new surroundings, they took the risk of leaving Watson a few weeks before the world championships to train in Lakewood with Peter Oppegard, who had teamed with Watson to win a pairs bronze medal at the 1988 Calgary Olympics.
SPORTS
February 8, 2006 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Rena Inoue hadn't felt good for a while. It was 1998, and she'd developed a cough, a persistent one that rattled her 4-foot-10, 95-pound frame. "And I noticed I got tired easily, much more than I should," said Inoue, who grew up in Japan and had been dispatched to Lake Arrowhead by her country's figure skating federation in 1996 to further her career. "I thought I had pneumonia or something, so I went to the doctor and checked it."
SPORTS
January 14, 2006 | Bill Plaschke
Leave it to the L.A. guy, the one with the blond hair and bare chest, to celebrate skating history as if it were beach volleyball. Shortly after John Baldwin threw and twirled Rena Inoue from here to Turin, he shouted and pumped his fist at her. Then he made out with her. At center ice. "C'mon, I've kissed her before," Baldwin said. "But never, ever on the lips in public," his father, John Sr., said.
SPORTS
January 11, 2006 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Nami Nari Nam refused to be a victim. As a 4-foot-8, 82-pound bundle of energy and charm, the Irvine resident was 13 when she captivated figure skating fans and finished second at the 1999 U.S. championships. She placed eighth in 2000, seemingly a minor setback, but the pain that developed in her hip that summer launched her on a painful and disheartening path. She initially was told she had a fracture in her growth plate; later, that she had torn cartilage in her hip and would need surgery.
SPORTS
January 18, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Rena Inoue had five stitches in her left knee, souvenir of a crash into the boards while landing a throw triple loop, and a grimace on her face. But after a series of terrible and often terrifying performances scrambled the standings Friday, she and her partner, John Baldwin Jr., had a bronze medal at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships and a berth at the World Championships. That made the Santa Monica couple's pain more bearable.
SPORTS
January 10, 2004 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
When Rena Inoue and John Baldwin of Santa Monica finished their free skate Friday, Baldwin was sure they had squandered their chance to win the U.S. pairs title or a berth at the World Championships in March. Baldwin, who has competed at every U.S. championship since 1986, doubled a triple jump, fell on another jump and watched in horror as Inoue fell on the landing of a throw triple salchow.
SPORTS
March 21, 2007 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
The English version of the website for the 2007 World Figure Skating Championships announces in red letters that the event is sold out. So only five members of Rena Inoue's extended family -- her mother, paternal grandfather, two aunts and an uncle, all from Osaka in southwestern Japan -- could get tickets to watch their expatriate relative skate for the United States with partner John Baldwin. Some of Inoue's cousins, other relatives and old friends had to stay home.
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