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Rena Owen

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1995 | KEN SHULMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She has become the emblem for the Maori renaissance, a two-fisted earth mother who fights to stem the slide of her people into indigence. For Rena Owen, a veteran 34-year-old actress born to an English mother and a Maori father, New Zealand is not the lush, romanticized wilderness of genteel British farmers depicted in "The Piano." "My land was once called Aotearoa, the land of the long white cloud," says Owen, star of Lee Tamahori's debut film, "Once Were Warriors," which opened last week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1995 | KEN SHULMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She has become the emblem for the Maori renaissance, a two-fisted earth mother who fights to stem the slide of her people into indigence. For Rena Owen, a veteran 34-year-old actress born to an English mother and a Maori father, New Zealand is not the lush, romanticized wilderness of genteel British farmers depicted in "The Piano." "My land was once called Aotearoa, the land of the long white cloud," says Owen, star of Lee Tamahori's debut film, "Once Were Warriors," which opened last week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Blue skies, lush green hillsides, a limpid lake: The first picture "Once Were Warriors" presents of New Zealand is the classic, expected one. But then the camera pulls back and that image is unmasked as a deceptive billboard sitting in a quite different environment, the trash-strewn, dead-end slums of gritty urban Auckland.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Garth Maxwell's "When Love Comes" is an edgy, multi-character love story whose central figure, a fading pop singer, is played by the compelling New Zealand actress Rena Owen, who won international acclaim as the weary, abused wife in Lee Tamahori's 1994 "Once Were Warriors." Owen's Katie Keen is a country girl whose natural singing talent took her to America in the late '70s, where she scored a No. 1 hit. She's been living off that renown ever since with increasingly diminishing returns.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1995
Spring is now Hollywood's favorite season for a quirky breakaway hit.
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