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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2011 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Ron Patterson, who with his then-wife Phyllis founded the Renaissance Pleasure Faire in 1963, which showcased traditions of 16th century Elizabethan England, has died. He was 80. Patterson died Jan. 15 in Sausalito, Calif., where he was receiving hospice care at the home of a friend, said his son Kevin. He had been in declining health for several years. For the first festival, which was held in North Hollywood, the couple enlisted fellow improvisational actors, craftsmen and others who dressed in their best approximation of Elizabethan-era costumes and intermingled with visitors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2011 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Ron Patterson, who with his then-wife Phyllis founded the Renaissance Pleasure Faire in 1963, which showcased traditions of 16th century Elizabethan England, has died. He was 80. Patterson died Jan. 15 in Sausalito, Calif., where he was receiving hospice care at the home of a friend, said his son Kevin. He had been in declining health for several years. For the first festival, which was held in North Hollywood, the couple enlisted fellow improvisational actors, craftsmen and others who dressed in their best approximation of Elizabethan-era costumes and intermingled with visitors.
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NEWS
April 7, 1991 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can come to the Renaissance Pleasure Faire in your Day-Glo shorts, high-top Nikes, Ray-Ban Wayfarers and Dodgers cap, but it would be a little like attending a Buckingham Palace garden party in a wet suit. Sure, you can get away with it--most faire-goers come in mufti and get the full Elizabethan thee-and-thou treatment from the costumed cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
When is an apple more than an apple? When it's resting in Eve's palm ? or better yet, in the hands of the storyteller(s) of Genesis. The same happens to other objects touched by myth: Fire, for instance, has Genesis-sized significance in the story of Prometheus, while an ordinary ring of gold glows with forbidden power in the story of the Nibelungs (and in the tales of that splendid latter-day jeweler, Tolkien). Pick the fable of your choice, and you're bound to find a seemingly ordinary object transformed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a stroke of exquisite timing, just before Easter, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has unveiled a major new acquisition. "The Last Supper," a monumental painting by late 15th-Century Spanish artist Pedro Berruguete, goes on view today in the Renaissance galleries of the Ahmanson Building. The museum acquired the rare work for an undisclosed price with funds provided by the Ahmanson Foundation. "It's a marvelous addition to the collection, in terms of its uniqueness as well as its majesty.
WORLD
March 9, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A 450-year-old painting by Renaissance artist Lucas Cranach the Elder has been stolen from a Lutheran church in the southern Norway town of Larvik, police said. Art expert Gunnar Krogh-Hansen estimated that "Suffer the Little Children to Come Unto Me" could be worth $2.1 million to $2.8 million. It was probably painted around 1540. The theft was discovered when firefighters responded to an alarm at the church and found a broken window and a ladder outside. The roughly 3-foot-wide work, painted on wood, had hung in the church for about 330 years.
REAL ESTATE
February 10, 2008 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Palazzo DI SONGI, a massive two-story villa within a few blocks of downtown Studio City, takes its inspiration from the Italian Renaissance. The courtyard fountain is from the Malcolm Forbes estate in Florence, Italy. The walls and some of the ceilings were made of Venetian plaster. Frescoes highlight an Italian chandelier in the entry. The foyer has a 400-year-old reproduction of a Greek warrior by an Italian artist, which can be purchased separately. It is flanked by medieval wall sconces.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By BOOTH MOORE, Fashion Critic
It was a rare moment of quiet during a whirlwind month of women's fashion shows, when models slowly paraded out into a gilded salon wearing the final 15 masterpieces by the late Lee Alexander McQueen. Each look had been hand-cut on a dress form by the British designer, who committed suicide last month, and each one was more breathtaking than the next. The pieces were so full of religious iconography, including angels and virgins, that one imagines McQueen was contemplating his own mortality while he was creating them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2002 | PAUL RICHARD, WASHINGTON POST
Think Florence in the Renaissance and the images that come to mind--of Leonardo's saints and Botticelli's goddesses--are obvious inventions, too good to be true. But artists of another sort, fabulously skillful ones, were also busy in the city. The earthbound masters in "The Flowering of Florence: Botanical Art for the Medici," which went on view this week and remains till May 27 at the National Gallery of Art, did not paint nymphs and angels. They studied leaves and flowers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
When is an apple more than an apple? When it's resting in Eve's palm ? or better yet, in the hands of the storyteller(s) of Genesis. The same happens to other objects touched by myth: Fire, for instance, has Genesis-sized significance in the story of Prometheus, while an ordinary ring of gold glows with forbidden power in the story of the Nibelungs (and in the tales of that splendid latter-day jeweler, Tolkien). Pick the fable of your choice, and you're bound to find a seemingly ordinary object transformed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By BOOTH MOORE, Fashion Critic
It was a rare moment of quiet during a whirlwind month of women's fashion shows, when models slowly paraded out into a gilded salon wearing the final 15 masterpieces by the late Lee Alexander McQueen. Each look had been hand-cut on a dress form by the British designer, who committed suicide last month, and each one was more breathtaking than the next. The pieces were so full of religious iconography, including angels and virgins, that one imagines McQueen was contemplating his own mortality while he was creating them.
WORLD
March 9, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A 450-year-old painting by Renaissance artist Lucas Cranach the Elder has been stolen from a Lutheran church in the southern Norway town of Larvik, police said. Art expert Gunnar Krogh-Hansen estimated that "Suffer the Little Children to Come Unto Me" could be worth $2.1 million to $2.8 million. It was probably painted around 1540. The theft was discovered when firefighters responded to an alarm at the church and found a broken window and a ladder outside. The roughly 3-foot-wide work, painted on wood, had hung in the church for about 330 years.
REAL ESTATE
February 10, 2008 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Palazzo DI SONGI, a massive two-story villa within a few blocks of downtown Studio City, takes its inspiration from the Italian Renaissance. The courtyard fountain is from the Malcolm Forbes estate in Florence, Italy. The walls and some of the ceilings were made of Venetian plaster. Frescoes highlight an Italian chandelier in the entry. The foyer has a 400-year-old reproduction of a Greek warrior by an Italian artist, which can be purchased separately. It is flanked by medieval wall sconces.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2002 | PAUL RICHARD, WASHINGTON POST
Think Florence in the Renaissance and the images that come to mind--of Leonardo's saints and Botticelli's goddesses--are obvious inventions, too good to be true. But artists of another sort, fabulously skillful ones, were also busy in the city. The earthbound masters in "The Flowering of Florence: Botanical Art for the Medici," which went on view this week and remains till May 27 at the National Gallery of Art, did not paint nymphs and angels. They studied leaves and flowers.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can come to the Renaissance Pleasure Faire in your Day-Glo shorts, high-top Nikes, Ray-Ban Wayfarers and Dodgers cap, but it would be a little like attending a Buckingham Palace garden party in a wet suit. Sure, you can get away with it--most faire-goers come in mufti and get the full Elizabethan thee-and-thou treatment from the costumed cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a stroke of exquisite timing, just before Easter, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has unveiled a major new acquisition. "The Last Supper," a monumental painting by late 15th-Century Spanish artist Pedro Berruguete, goes on view today in the Renaissance galleries of the Ahmanson Building. The museum acquired the rare work for an undisclosed price with funds provided by the Ahmanson Foundation. "It's a marvelous addition to the collection, in terms of its uniqueness as well as its majesty.
NEWS
January 10, 1988 | Associated Press
Experts will examine a lock of hair and four teeth found underneath a Renaissance-era palace to see if they belonged to Lorenzo de Medici, known as Lorenzo the Magnificent, the patron of Michelangelo and other art giants. The Italian news agency ANSA reported last week that the remains were found in containers during excavations under Medici Palace in Riccardi, outside Florence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By David Ng
A notebook from Leonardo da Vinci that contains some of the Renaissance-era thinker's scientific and artistic studies has been digitized by the British Library and is now available for online viewing. The so-called "Codex Arundel" is viewable on the British Library's website . The notebook contains the artist's trademark backward writing that can be read (in Italian) when reflected in a mirror. The British Library says on its site that the notebook features "diagrams, drawings and brief texts, covering a broad range of topics in science and art, as well as personal notes.
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