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Renal Care Group Inc

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BUSINESS
September 2, 2000 | Reuters
Renal Care Group Inc. said that it closed a dialysis unit in Youngstown, Ohio, after a patient undergoing treatment there died and 18 others were hospitalized with chills and fever. The problem occurred Wednesday and is being investigated by local, state and federal authorities, including the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No cause of the symptoms has been determined.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
Fresenius Medical Care said Wednesday that it would acquire Renal Care Group Inc. in a $3.5-billion deal that would make it one of the world's biggest dialysis-care companies. Fresenius, based in Bad Homburg, Germany, said it would pay $48 a share for Nashville-based Renal Care. The deal is subject to regulatory approval in the U.S. and Europe. "This acquisition solidifies Fresenius Medical Care's position as the leader in dialysis services in the U.S.," Chief Executive Ben Lipps said.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
Fresenius Medical Care said Wednesday that it would acquire Renal Care Group Inc. in a $3.5-billion deal that would make it one of the world's biggest dialysis-care companies. Fresenius, based in Bad Homburg, Germany, said it would pay $48 a share for Nashville-based Renal Care. The deal is subject to regulatory approval in the U.S. and Europe. "This acquisition solidifies Fresenius Medical Care's position as the leader in dialysis services in the U.S.," Chief Executive Ben Lipps said.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2000 | Reuters
Renal Care Group Inc. said that it closed a dialysis unit in Youngstown, Ohio, after a patient undergoing treatment there died and 18 others were hospitalized with chills and fever. The problem occurred Wednesday and is being investigated by local, state and federal authorities, including the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No cause of the symptoms has been determined.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Medicare payments for Amgen Inc.'s Epogen and other drugs would be reduced under a $2-billion proposal introduced by President Clinton. The administration last month signaled Clinton's intention to try to get Congress to cut payments for the anti-anemia drug. Epogen accounted for about half of Amgen's 1997 revenue, much of that from the government Medicare health insurance program.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
DaVita Inc. agreed to buy Gambro's U.S. clinics for $3.1 billion in cash to become the kidney treatment leader in the world's biggest healthcare market. DaVita, based in El Segundo, will double the number of people using its services to 96,000 patients at more than 1,200 sites in the U.S. The Gambro unit had about $1.8 billion in 2003 sales, the Swedish company said. Gambro's operations will allow DaVita to overtake Fresenius Medical Care of Germany, whose 84,600 U.S.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
A Justice Department probe of the kidney dialysis industry widened Wednesday as two more companies, Abbott Laboratories and Fresenius Medical Care, disclosed that they had received subpoenas for documents related to the use of vitamin D. The news came a day after DaVita Inc. of El Segundo and Renal Care Group Inc. of Nashville said they had received subpoenas from the U.S. attorney's office in New York.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
DaVita Inc. of El Segundo disclosed Tuesday that it had received a subpoena from the Justice Department for documents related to its kidney dialysis operations and laboratory services. A DaVita rival, Renal Care Group Inc. of Nashville, revealed that it too had been subpoenaed. The companies said the U.S. attorney's office in New York wanted, among other things, information on vitamin D therapies and tests given to kidney patients to determine whether they needed such treatments.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
By any measure, Epogen is a true wonder drug. Since it went on sale 15 years ago, it has improved the lives of thousands of kidney dialysis patients and made its inventor, Amgen Inc., a biotech behemoth. The medicine has racked up more than $17 billion in sales since 1989 and reduced the need for blood transfusions in patients with anemia, a consequence of kidney failure. Now the agency that administers the federal Medicare program is asking whether Epogen's success has come at too high a price.
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