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Renaldo Skeets Nehemiah

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SPORTS
June 10, 1989 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
"The Hurdlers," a long-running real life soap opera that was canceled for a while, will be renewed today in the McDonald's Jackie Joyner-Kersee track meet at Drake Stadium. The familiar cast has been reassembled: Greg Foster, who is making a comeback from another broken arm; Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah, who has been on a perpetual comeback since his pro football days with the San Francisco 49ers ended in 1986, and Roger Kingdom, the Olympic gold medalist, who has nothing to prove.
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SPORTS
January 19, 1988 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
In what could be called Comeback II, Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah isn't making any predictions as to what he'll accomplish on the track. Once regarded as the world's greatest high hurdler and still the world record-holder in the 110-meter race at 12.93 seconds, Nehemiah seems content just to be competing again.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
"The Hurdlers," a long-running real life soap opera that was canceled for a while, will be renewed today in the McDonald's Jackie Joyner-Kersee track meet at Drake Stadium. The familiar cast has been reassembled: Greg Foster, who is making a comeback from another broken arm; Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah, who has been on a perpetual comeback since his pro football days with the San Francisco 49ers ended in 1986, and Roger Kingdom, the Olympic gold medalist, who has nothing to prove.
SPORTS
July 29, 1986 | JULIE CART
The United States Olympic Committee today will decide whether Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah, the world record-holder in the 110-meter hurdles, will be allowed to compete in the Olympic Festival. The Athletics Congress, track and field's governing body in the United States, has extended an invitation to Nehemiah to run in a relay race during this weekend's track and field portion of the Festival and has said he could also compete in the hurdles if another competitor withdrew.
SPORTS
March 9, 1986 | KEN DENLINGER, The Washington Post
For nearly a month, the fastest human in Centreville, Va., thought he might be able to combine three of the neatest things in life: History, money and fun. Darrell Green all but had his track shoes laced for an assault on the indoor and outdoor sprints. The Redskins' 26-year-old cornerback had re-established his track credentials by smoking Herschel Walker and some other elite pro football players in a 60-yard dash during a major meet in Dallas Feb. 1.
SPORTS
July 27, 1989 | Jim Murray
Tonie Campbell is what the fight mob would call "strictly an opponent." He is the track-and-field equivalent of that pugilistic staple, the trial horse. He's good but not too. He's fast but not fastest. He's tough, skilled, he gets the most out of what he has. He's a survivor. If he were a baseball player, he'd bat second. In football, he'd catch everything thrown to him. There's a quality of undiscourageability to him. You get what you pay for from Tonie Campbell.
SPORTS
January 16, 1987 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
From Russia with love. That's the message Sergei Bubka sent to American pole vaulters Thursday when he improved his world indoor record to 19 feet 6 1/2 inches at Osaka, Japan. The indoor season is barely under way, and the incomparable Bubka has already put the pressure on his counterparts in the United States. Bubka and Billy Olson each broke the world record four times in 1986, and Joe Dial did it once.
SPORTS
September 24, 1985 | KEN DENLINGER, The Washington Post
The arms race with the Soviet Union is starting to intensify. Also the legs race, the eyes race, the trigger-finger race and the percentage-of-body fat race, as well as the race by certain chauvinists to build better athletes through chemistry--and the equally spirited race by concerned officials to keep that from happening. Sure looks like a little good news this past week: U.S.
SPORTS
January 19, 1988 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
In what could be called Comeback II, Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah isn't making any predictions as to what he'll accomplish on the track. Once regarded as the world's greatest high hurdler and still the world record-holder in the 110-meter race at 12.93 seconds, Nehemiah seems content just to be competing again.
SPORTS
September 16, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in seven years, Greg Foster and Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah, the two fastest high hurdlers in the history of track and field, met outdoors Tuesday night. But Foster hardly acknowledged the significance of the occasion. He could not be bothered with settling an old score, so busy was he with a new one.
SPORTS
January 20, 1988 | Scott Ostler
Greg Foster, world's foremost high hurdler, lives alone, drives alone, dines alone and trains alone, and likes it that way. Sometimes he goes searching for an even higher state of alone-ness. Once in a while, on a whim, Foster will pack a bag and head for the airport. He'll buy a ticket to anywhere, no place in particular. He'll hit town like a spy, wearing hat and shades. He'll check into a hotel, go out to dinner by himself, go to a movie by himself.
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