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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987
Behn's account distorts facts, ignores history and is an apologia for a fractious group that has terrorized thousands of civilians in Mozambique. Neither Behn nor the leaders of Renamo can deny that Renamo was created by Rhodesian security forces during the struggle for Zimbabwe independence. Those in the Rhodesian security forces have given detailed accounts of their creation of Renamo to destabilize Mozambique so it could not assist the liberation forces for Zimbabwe. Further, they have documented how the group was flown to South Africa in 1979 (at the time of Zimbabwe independence)
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NEWS
September 11, 1994 | DONNA BRYSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After 15 years of civil war, the soldiers at Catemba are fighting again--for faster processing of their discharge papers. Government soldiers, like the rebels they battled, are going home. At last, their leaders have acknowledged there can be no winner in one of Africa's longest wars. About 600,000 people died and 1 million fled the former Portuguese colony during the war, which ended in 1992 with a peace agreement signed by President Joaquim Chissano and rebel leader Afonso Dhlakama.
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NEWS
November 12, 1989 | RUTH AYISI, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Despite an escalation in Mozambique's grinding civil war, one of the leading figures in the peace effort, Roman Catholic Archbishop Jaime Goncalves, says he remains confident of securing a cease-fire between government forces and right-wing guerrillas. "The feeling is that both sides want the situation to be solved quickly," Goncalves said in an interview in the Indian Ocean port of Beira. He predicted that "a cease-fire will be (in effect in) less than one year." Many Mozambicans are unlikely to share Goncalves' optimism.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Mozambique President Joaquim Chissano and rebel leader Afonso Dhlakama sealed an accord Friday to end 16 years of civil war by Oct. 1, ending three days of talks with an emotional embrace. "This is a historic day for the people of Mozambique and Africa. . . . Please, no more deaths. No more war," Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe, who brought the two foes together for the first time, said after the signing ceremony.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Mozambique President Joaquim Chissano and rebel leader Afonso Dhlakama sealed an accord Friday to end 16 years of civil war by Oct. 1, ending three days of talks with an emotional embrace. "This is a historic day for the people of Mozambique and Africa. . . . Please, no more deaths. No more war," Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe, who brought the two foes together for the first time, said after the signing ceremony.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was still a crowd at the ferry landing outside this port center late on the day that Manuel Antonio crossed over with his retinue. Those with him were part of his "spirit army," mostly teen-age boys he had mysteriously "immunized" against bullets, the better to cleanse the countryside of the rebel guerrillas who have waged a 15-year war of devastation in Mozambique.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The elderly were gunned down by the score, hospital patients were shot dead in their beds and babies were killed as they nursed at their mothers' breasts. More than 380 people, mostly women and children, died in the massacre at Homoine, one of the worst in Mozambique's decade-long civil war, and the death toll continues to rise as more bodies are found, as more of the critically wounded die.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1987
The Senate, at long last ignoring the bad advice of Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), finally summoned its collective courage and good sense and did what it should have done 10 months ago by confirming Melissa Wells as the new American ambassador to Mozambique. She is a career Foreign Service officer with substantial experience in Africa, well qualified for the delicate task of pursuing the constructive policy that President Reagan has followed for that desperate and confused country.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Madih Asmani had a straw bed mat on his head and his legs were swollen from two nights of hiking when he first laid tired eyes on this oasis. Power lines hung limply over a highway turned to weeds, coconuts rotted beside trees felled out of spite and sunlight poured into hundreds of roofless stores and houses. But the sight of government soldiers in a ring of bunkers, shouldering AK-47 rifles to protect what little was left here, lifted his spirits.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first word of the catastrophe brewing in this former mining town deep in the interior came from a band of 50 naked, starving men. They emerged from the bush one day at an emergency feeding center at Gile, 40 miles east, unclothed except for strips of tree bark and begging for seeds and farm implements. There are 20,000 of us in Morrua, they told a stunned worker from World Vision International, the Monrovia, Calif.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was still a crowd at the ferry landing outside this port center late on the day that Manuel Antonio crossed over with his retinue. Those with him were part of his "spirit army," mostly teen-age boys he had mysteriously "immunized" against bullets, the better to cleanse the countryside of the rebel guerrillas who have waged a 15-year war of devastation in Mozambique.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first word of the catastrophe brewing in this former mining town deep in the interior came from a band of 50 naked, starving men. They emerged from the bush one day at an emergency feeding center at Gile, 40 miles east, unclothed except for strips of tree bark and begging for seeds and farm implements. There are 20,000 of us in Morrua, they told a stunned worker from World Vision International, the Monrovia, Calif.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | RUTH AYISI, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Despite an escalation in Mozambique's grinding civil war, one of the leading figures in the peace effort, Roman Catholic Archbishop Jaime Goncalves, says he remains confident of securing a cease-fire between government forces and right-wing guerrillas. "The feeling is that both sides want the situation to be solved quickly," Goncalves said in an interview in the Indian Ocean port of Beira. He predicted that "a cease-fire will be (in effect in) less than one year." Many Mozambicans are unlikely to share Goncalves' optimism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1987
The Senate, at long last ignoring the bad advice of Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), finally summoned its collective courage and good sense and did what it should have done 10 months ago by confirming Melissa Wells as the new American ambassador to Mozambique. She is a career Foreign Service officer with substantial experience in Africa, well qualified for the delicate task of pursuing the constructive policy that President Reagan has followed for that desperate and confused country.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Madih Asmani had a straw bed mat on his head and his legs were swollen from two nights of hiking when he first laid tired eyes on this oasis. Power lines hung limply over a highway turned to weeds, coconuts rotted beside trees felled out of spite and sunlight poured into hundreds of roofless stores and houses. But the sight of government soldiers in a ring of bunkers, shouldering AK-47 rifles to protect what little was left here, lifted his spirits.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The elderly were gunned down by the score, hospital patients were shot dead in their beds and babies were killed as they nursed at their mothers' breasts. More than 380 people, mostly women and children, died in the massacre at Homoine, one of the worst in Mozambique's decade-long civil war, and the death toll continues to rise as more bodies are found, as more of the critically wounded die.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987
Behn's account distorts facts, ignores history and is an apologia for a fractious group that has terrorized thousands of civilians in Mozambique. Neither Behn nor the leaders of Renamo can deny that Renamo was created by Rhodesian security forces during the struggle for Zimbabwe independence. Those in the Rhodesian security forces have given detailed accounts of their creation of Renamo to destabilize Mozambique so it could not assist the liberation forces for Zimbabwe. Further, they have documented how the group was flown to South Africa in 1979 (at the time of Zimbabwe independence)
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