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Renata Tebaldi

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
Renata Tebaldi, an Italian soprano renowned for her angelic voice, her stardom at New York's Metropolitan Opera and Italy's La Scala and her media-fueled rivalry with Maria Callas, died Sunday at age 82. The opera singer died at her home in San Marino, a tiny, independent republic in north-central Italy, after a long illness, said her physician, Dr. Niksa Simetovic. Tebaldi was considered to have one of the most beautiful voices of the 20th century, relying on rich, perfectly produced tones.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2005
In your listing of entertainment figures who died in 2004 ["Remembering, With Respect," by Susan King, Dec. 31], you left out an actor who had a Hollywood career spanning almost 30 years, eventually becoming the president of the Screen Actors' Guild. He also went on to a second career that included numerous movies, TV shows, documentaries and award shows, usually listed as "Himself" in the credits. Probably no actor had the influence, for better or worse, than Ronald Reagan. David Goodwin Los Angeles I can't believe you omitted one of the greatest: soprano Renata Tebaldi, who died in mid-December.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988 | WALTER PRICE
In her heyday during the 1950s and '60s, she was dubbed "La Superba" by her admirers. Today at 66, Renata Tebaldi might well be called "La Serena." There must be some Italian alchemy at work here. The lady looks as if she were in her early 50s, at most. Her skin is almost as flawless as it was 38 years ago when she made her debut as Aida with the San Francisco Opera. Her eyes are the same Paul Newman blue, but her once-black hair has been auburn for some time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2004 | Tim Page, Washington Post
The word "diva" has long since been appropriated by showbiz hucksters and campy fashionistas who like to place the grand cloak on the tiny shoulders of Beyonce Knowles, Celine Dion and whoever the replacements for Beyonce and Celine might be the week after next. Still, if you're comfortable with the word at all -- which the Oxford English Dictionary defines as a "distinguished female singer, a prima donna" -- you can apply it truthfully to Renata Tebaldi, who died Sunday at the age of 82.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1995 | WALTER PRICE, Special To The Times
Despite frigid temperatures Tuesday afternoon outside the Metropolitan Opera's Founders Hall, more than 1,200 people lined up for hours to see her. Twenty-four hours earlier, Mayor Rudolph Guiliani had decreed Dec. 11 her day in New York City. Renata Tebaldi, one of the greatest Italian lirico spinto sopranos since World War II, triumphantly had returned to America and the Met after a 19-year absence. "And the voice . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2005
In your listing of entertainment figures who died in 2004 ["Remembering, With Respect," by Susan King, Dec. 31], you left out an actor who had a Hollywood career spanning almost 30 years, eventually becoming the president of the Screen Actors' Guild. He also went on to a second career that included numerous movies, TV shows, documentaries and award shows, usually listed as "Himself" in the credits. Probably no actor had the influence, for better or worse, than Ronald Reagan. David Goodwin Los Angeles I can't believe you omitted one of the greatest: soprano Renata Tebaldi, who died in mid-December.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2004 | Tim Page, Washington Post
The word "diva" has long since been appropriated by showbiz hucksters and campy fashionistas who like to place the grand cloak on the tiny shoulders of Beyonce Knowles, Celine Dion and whoever the replacements for Beyonce and Celine might be the week after next. Still, if you're comfortable with the word at all -- which the Oxford English Dictionary defines as a "distinguished female singer, a prima donna" -- you can apply it truthfully to Renata Tebaldi, who died Sunday at the age of 82.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
They don't seem to make Verdian spintos anymore. At least they don't make 'em like they used to. Rosa Ponselle was a spinto. So was Zinka Milanov. Renata Tebaldi and Leontyne Price followed. Then came the big, painful void. The sopranos mentioned above were drastically dissimilar singers, but they shared certain basic virtues. Each commanded a healthy, warm, pliant sound--opulent in the middle, brilliant and radiant at the top.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By David Ng
Hard as it is to believe that an opera singer can make gossip headlines, Maria Callas was, in her prime, a media phenomenon whose personal life was fodder for journalists and chroniclers of high society.  A symbol of jet-set elegance, Callas was a temperamental celebrity who had a fiery love life. Her diva-hood  on and off the stage was legendary. The American-born Greek soprano would have been 90 on Monday, a fact marked by a Google tribute. Callas was born in New York in 1923 to Greek immigrant parents.
NEWS
April 13, 2006
Music lovers seem to love rivalries, and people are still arguing whether Maria Callas or Renata Tebaldi was the greater Tosca. Today, the argument focuses on Lang Lang versus Yundi Li, two young powerhouse Chinese pianists born the same year, 1982. Whether this argument is good for either of them or for music in general, it will doubtlessly go on for a long time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
Renata Tebaldi, an Italian soprano renowned for her angelic voice, her stardom at New York's Metropolitan Opera and Italy's La Scala and her media-fueled rivalry with Maria Callas, died Sunday at age 82. The opera singer died at her home in San Marino, a tiny, independent republic in north-central Italy, after a long illness, said her physician, Dr. Niksa Simetovic. Tebaldi was considered to have one of the most beautiful voices of the 20th century, relying on rich, perfectly produced tones.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1995 | WALTER PRICE, Special To The Times
Despite frigid temperatures Tuesday afternoon outside the Metropolitan Opera's Founders Hall, more than 1,200 people lined up for hours to see her. Twenty-four hours earlier, Mayor Rudolph Guiliani had decreed Dec. 11 her day in New York City. Renata Tebaldi, one of the greatest Italian lirico spinto sopranos since World War II, triumphantly had returned to America and the Met after a 19-year absence. "And the voice . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988 | WALTER PRICE
In her heyday during the 1950s and '60s, she was dubbed "La Superba" by her admirers. Today at 66, Renata Tebaldi might well be called "La Serena." There must be some Italian alchemy at work here. The lady looks as if she were in her early 50s, at most. Her skin is almost as flawless as it was 38 years ago when she made her debut as Aida with the San Francisco Opera. Her eyes are the same Paul Newman blue, but her once-black hair has been auburn for some time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
They don't seem to make Verdian spintos anymore. At least they don't make 'em like they used to. Rosa Ponselle was a spinto. So was Zinka Milanov. Renata Tebaldi and Leontyne Price followed. Then came the big, painful void. The sopranos mentioned above were drastically dissimilar singers, but they shared certain basic virtues. Each commanded a healthy, warm, pliant sound--opulent in the middle, brilliant and radiant at the top.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1996
Francesco Siciliani, 85, one of Italy's leading opera impresarios. Siciliani, who once said he learned to read notes before words, was a musical prodigy and composer. He became famous for helping revive Italy's musical scene after World War II. Among the great opera houses he led were Milan's La Scala, the San Carlo theater in Naples and the Florence opera. He promoted the early careers of such artists as Maria Callas and Renata Tebaldi. At the time of his death, he was artistic director of the Venice opera.
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