Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRenato Ruggiero
IN THE NEWS

Renato Ruggiero

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking a deadlock that threatened to disrupt the new global trade organization even before it opened for business, the United States and the world's other major trading nations have decided to name an experienced Italian trade official to lead the new World Trade Organization, a senior Clinton Administration official said Monday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Italy's foreign minister resigned Saturday after a spat with Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi over the government's lukewarm reception of the euro currency. Renato Ruggiero's resignation was likely to spark concerns among other European nations since he had been seen as lending credibility to the billionaire media mogul's administration and as balancing some of its right-wing or anti-European Union ministers.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 22, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first director of the new international body overseeing global trade, seeking to allay U.S. concerns that he would be soft on European protectionism, on Tuesday warned of "the danger of economic nationalism." After spending much of the morning meeting with senior Clinton Administration economic officials, Renato Ruggiero, a former Italian trade minister, won the Administration's official blessing to become director general of the World Trade Organization. The U.S.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first director of the new international body overseeing global trade, seeking to allay U.S. concerns that he would be soft on European protectionism, on Tuesday warned of "the danger of economic nationalism." After spending much of the morning meeting with senior Clinton Administration economic officials, Renato Ruggiero, a former Italian trade minister, won the Administration's official blessing to become director general of the World Trade Organization. The U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Italy's foreign minister resigned Saturday after a spat with Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi over the government's lukewarm reception of the euro currency. Renato Ruggiero's resignation was likely to spark concerns among other European nations since he had been seen as lending credibility to the billionaire media mogul's administration and as balancing some of its right-wing or anti-European Union ministers.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fiat to Invest in Polish Car Maker: The Italian auto maker agreed to invest about $2 billion for a 90% stake in a joint venture with Polish car maker FSM, the biggest investment yet by a foreign company in Poland. Under the agreement, which must be approved by the Polish government and Fiat's board, Warsaw will put the automotive activities of Fabryka Samochodow Malolitrazowych into the venture and hold a 10% stake in the new enterprise.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi named himself interim foreign minister amid concerns that Italy would grow more isolated after the resignation of its respected foreign envoy. Foreign Minister Renato Ruggiero quit Saturday after seven months of fractious relations with the conservative government over European policy and a dispute with Berlusconi over his coalition's unenthusiastic reception of the euro currency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1999
The unseemly process of picking a replacement for the outgoing World Trade Organization director-general, Renato Ruggiero, has been variously described as a mess and travesty. And that's what it was until a compromise was struck to provide leadership for the next six years, with the remaining two candidates serving consecutive three-year terms. It's not ideal, but it's better than having no chief at all as the organization gears up for a new round of trade liberalization talks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1999
The World Trade Organization has been trying for six months to pick its next director-general, and all it has produced so far is undiplomatic brawling, heated argument and accusations of ill will. The choice between the two leading candidates is not an easy one, but it can, and should, be made now. All that's needed is willingness of the member countries to put the credibility of the WTO ahead of their own narrow national and regional interests and reach a compromise.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1999 | From Reuters
The European Union and the United States were holding last-minute talks Sunday aimed at heading off a trade war over bananas that would hit EU exports and the authority of the World Trade Organization. Diplomats said contacts were underway between officials in Brussels and Washington, and meetings were arranged between the trade ambassadors of the two powers in Geneva to avoid a clash set for today after WTO chief Renato Ruggiero proposed a way out of the dispute.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking a deadlock that threatened to disrupt the new global trade organization even before it opened for business, the United States and the world's other major trading nations have decided to name an experienced Italian trade official to lead the new World Trade Organization, a senior Clinton Administration official said Monday.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
An agreement to open up the world's multitrillion-dollar global banking and insurance markets remained elusive as today's deadline approached. Financial turmoil in Asia and political doubts in the U.S. appeared to be delaying the deal. "We are not quite there yet, but we are poised to get that deal," European Union trade chief Leon Brittan said Thursday. "The apple is ripening rapidly on the tree, but needs a touch more sun to fall into our lap."
BUSINESS
October 18, 1988 | From Reuters
Italy announced Monday that it will provide the Soviet Union with $775 million in export credits, which may help Moscow snap up almost $5 billion in credits from Western Europe by the end of the week. Italy's Foreign Trade Ministry said it had signed an accord to provide Moscow with a credit worth 680 million European Currency Units. This followed news last week that West German banks had agreed to offer the Soviet Union a $1.6-billion credit package.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|