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Rendition

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NEWS
May 26, 1991
The season-series finale of "Dallas" was an absurd and quite unreasonable ending to a program that has more often than not retained my interest and loyalty. Not only was I appalled at the monotonous and totally twisted rendition of life without J.R. Ewing, but my 86-year-old grandmother was disconcerted by the abominable antics of our once-favorite characters. I agree, "Dallas" did go off with a bang. However, not a moment too soon. Carole Bush, Malibu
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Following directly on the heels of the potent performance of Verdi's Requiem by San Diego Opera on Thursday, the New West Symphony tackled this great work for chorus, orchestra and four vocal soloists. A requiem mass that is an opera in all but setting, Verdi's late score can easily take on different meanings in different contexts. These were very different contexts. In San Diego, the requiem was given the day after the 49-year-old company callously and inexplicably announced, without advance warning, that it would cease operations in less than a month despite no debt on the books.
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NATIONAL
August 22, 2009 | Bob Drogin
A Lebanese citizen being held in a detention center here was hooded, stripped naked for photographs and bundled onto an executive jet by FBI agents in Afghanistan in April, making him the first known target of a rendition during the Obama administration. Unlike terrorism suspects who were secretly snatched by the CIA and harshly interrogated and imprisoned overseas during the George W. Bush administration, Raymond Azar was flown to this Washington suburb for a case involving inflated invoices.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Might "American Idol's" slide into irrelevance be a boon for its talent? That's one takeaway to be drawn from the surprisingly strong debut by Candice Glover, who last year won the televised singing competition amid historically low ratings. A big-voiced soul belter, Glover ended a lengthy stretch of victories by white-guy guitar strummers, including Lee DeWyze and Phillip Phillips - reason enough to celebrate her win. But she's also made a better record than the last few "Idol" champs, one that doesn't sound like its quirks have been ironed out in an attempt to satisfy the show's once-enormous audience.
OPINION
February 6, 2013 | By Amrit Singh
When John Brennan, the White House counter-terrorism advisor, appears Thursday at confirmation hearings to become the CIA's next director, Americans will have a rare opportunity to learn new details about the intelligence agency's secret rendition and detention program. Brennan served in the CIA while the George W. Bush administration was "rendering" terrorism suspects - nabbing them off streets around the world to be secretly detained and interrogated, sometimes using torture, while in the custody of the CIA or foreign governments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1990
Roseanne Barr's lousy rendition of our national anthem is symptomatic of our times. She is living proof that a disrespectful slob can do just about anything. And no matter how odious, the adoring fans will continue to help said obscenity laugh all the way to the bank. M.R. MACDONALD San Marcos
BUSINESS
January 10, 1988
As anyone can see, in the Times' rendition, it was not a bull market but a steer market, in fact a bum steer market. And, as is common knowledge, a steer is raised for only one purpose--a fat killing. GEORGE J. FOX Altadena
NEWS
November 24, 1985
The Television Times cover of Nov. 3 poignantly depicted Lucille Ball as a bag lady. Unfortunately, her movie "Stone Pillow" involved an unbelievable "Cinderella" rendition that at best offered fantasy hope to the many homeless now awaiting their rescue by a benevolent social worker. Connie Barnato, Granada Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1998
Loved "A Record That Is Out of Reach" (March 28), but with two reservations. The Society of Early Recorded Music did not listen to a lecture by "Emile Berliner, grandson of the inventor of the disc record." Emile was the inventor, his grandson who gave the lecture was the undersigned. I can't agree that the Five Sharps' rendition of "Stormy Weather" is the Holy Grail of sound recordings. Rather, I like to think that my grandfather's personal recital of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star," recorded in 1889, merits that accolade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1999
Regarding the review of the L.A. Chamber Orchestra by Daniel Cariaga ("Subtleties Nearly Lost Amid Chamber Celebration," Sept. 27): I attended the concert reviewed and found myself disagreeing with some of the interpretation and rendition of the music. But the performances were predominantly delightful, nuanced and thoroughly satisfying. The headline not only contradicts the tenor of Cariaga's review but is exaggerated and grossly unfair to the musicians who presented the program. G. SCHAEFER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By David Ng
The Seattle Seahawks took home the Super Bowl championship on Sunday, roundly beating the Denver Broncos, 43-8. Another big winner for the evening was operatic soprano Renée Fleming, whose near flawless rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" provided a rousing start to pro football's biggest night.  Fleming, wearing a black dress with a white wrap, sang the national anthem to a recording provided by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, with a...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - Few people would mistake the Long Island commuter town of Bethpage (elevation: 105 feet) for the Austrian Alps. But on a vast soundstage in an anonymous industrial park about 45 minutes from Manhattan sits a gently sloping, man-made hill that will double for one of that country's scenic peaks on Thursday. That's when NBC unveils "The Sound of Music Live!," a three-hour televised version of the 1959 Rodgers & Hammerstein musical featuring country music megastar Carrie Underwood in the iconic role of free-spirited nun-turned-governess Maria.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The Madrid-based Rakatá brought "Henry VIII/Enrique VIII" to the Broad Stage in Santa Monica last weekend, and the company applied its extensive experience with Spanish Golden Age classics to the staging of Shakespeare's seldom revived history play. The result was a production that had the speed of Lope de Vega, the refinement of Calderón and just enough slippery ambiguity to remind us that this was indeed a Shakespearean foray. Scholars are still debating whether Shakespeare wrote "Henry VIII" solo or in collaboration, but the sordid saga - adultery mixed with church-state double-dealing - continues to exert its peculiar hold on modern audiences.
SPORTS
September 7, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
She'll sing that she's been waiting all day for Sunday night, but really Carrie Underwood has been waiting months. Underwood, who replaces Faith Hill in singing the "Sunday Night Football" opening for NBC, performed her segment in June at an airport-hangar-sized studio in Playa Vista. Her rendition debuts Sunday night when the New York Giants open the season against the Dallas Cowboys. The song will be the same one sung by Pink in 2006, and Hill each year since - "Waiting All Day for Sunday Night" - but Underwood's version is intended to be faster-paced and more energetic.
OPINION
February 6, 2013 | By Amrit Singh
When John Brennan, the White House counter-terrorism advisor, appears Thursday at confirmation hearings to become the CIA's next director, Americans will have a rare opportunity to learn new details about the intelligence agency's secret rendition and detention program. Brennan served in the CIA while the George W. Bush administration was "rendering" terrorism suspects - nabbing them off streets around the world to be secretly detained and interrogated, sometimes using torture, while in the custody of the CIA or foreign governments.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Todd Martens
The Rolling Stones in 2012 may no longer be a great rock 'n' roll band, but the act can certainly leave a crowd wanting more. The above is not meant to disparage anyone celebrating a 50th anniversary, nor does it offer a revelation. The Stones have been professional entertainers for decades now, and the band knows how to play to an audience. Perhaps frustratingly, the band also knows how to show just enough rock 'n' roll mettle to lead one to believe that someday, maybe they can once again be a great rock 'n' roll band.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990
I am researching the life of Guy Williams for a tribute book. Known around the world as the romantic masked rider, Zorro, he gave us a timeless rendition of a legend--and thus, became a legend himself. If anyone has any information, anecdotes, letters, pictures (especially from 1920s-'40s), or anything to relate, please contact me. ANTOINETTE G. LANE P.O. Box 675 San Pedro, CA 90734
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Todd Martens
The Rolling Stones in 2012 may no longer be a great rock 'n' roll band, but the act can certainly leave a crowd wanting more. The above is not meant to disparage anyone celebrating a 50th anniversary, nor does it offer a revelation. The Stones have been professional entertainers for decades now, and the band knows how to play to an audience. Perhaps frustratingly, the band also knows how to show just enough rock 'n' roll mettle to lead one to believe that someday, maybe they can once again be a great rock 'n' roll band.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
It stands among the most public American foul-ups in the war on terrorism: A 2003 CIA operation to snatch an Islamic cleric from the streets of Milan and secretly deliver him to an Egyptian prison was exposed in embarrassing detail by an Italian prosecutor, who won convictions against 23 Americans on kidnapping and related offenses. The cleric, known as Abu Omar, said he was tortured in Egypt almost daily for seven months. Some of the CIA officers who had arranged the kidnapping spent thousands of dollars afterward staying at luxurious Italian resorts, according to Italian investigators who pieced together their movements using cellphone and hotel records.
OPINION
May 18, 2011
In a perfunctory order, the Supreme Court on Monday denied a day in court to five alleged victims of one of the grossest abuses of the war on terror: "extraordinary rendition. " That's the euphemism for transferring suspects abroad for interrogation and, it's alleged, torture. Besides denying the five any form of redress for their grievances, the court's action endorses the federal government's overuse of the so-called state secrets privilege to short-circuit the judicial process. That makes the court's action doubly shameful.
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