Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRene Di Rosa
IN THE NEWS

Rene Di Rosa

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
September 18, 2005 | Michael A. Hiltzik, Michael A. Hiltzik writes the "Golden State" business column for The Times. His latest book is "The Plot Against Social Security."
Garbed improbably but characteristically in a worn denim shirt and a faded trucker's cap, Rene di Rosa is apologizing for his faltering memory. We are in the main room of the gray stone house that was his residence for the better part of 30 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
September 18, 2005 | Michael A. Hiltzik, Michael A. Hiltzik writes the "Golden State" business column for The Times. His latest book is "The Plot Against Social Security."
Garbed improbably but characteristically in a worn denim shirt and a faded trucker's cap, Rene di Rosa is apologizing for his faltering memory. We are in the main room of the gray stone house that was his residence for the better part of 30 years.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
February 4, 1986
The Napa Valley vineyard's owner, Rene di Rosa, said Jos. E. Seagram & Sons has signed a letter of intent to purchase 250 acres of the 460-acre Carneros property. Di Rosa did not disclose the value of the sale. Di Rosa plans to convert the balance of the property into an "art park." The 250 acres, planted in Chardonnay and Pinot noir grapes, will become the southernmost estate of Sterling Vineyards, which is a part of the wine production division of Seagram.
MAGAZINE
July 24, 1988 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
THE TABLE arrangement was typical, except for the seven wineglasses surrounding each setting. The location was the dining room of the St. James Club on the Sunset Strip, the former Sunset Tower, a sparkling Art Deco monument to the late 1920s. The host welcoming the roomful of guests was Samuel Bronfman II, president of the Seagram Classics Wine Co.
MAGAZINE
November 10, 1985 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
The word belvedere rings with loveliness in sound and meaning. Yet today, in its wine parlance, the Belvedere Winery of Healdsburg, in Sonoma County, is downplaying its name so that it is virtually unnoticeable. On winery labels, the emphasis is wholly upon the names of the vineyards from which the grapes for these outstanding wines have been taken. By its own definition, "Belvedere is a group of outstanding professionals dedicated to the art of fine wine making."
FOOD
April 10, 1986 | NATHAN CHROMAN, Chroman is a free-lance wine writer and author who also practices law in Beverly Hills
Consumers have turned away in droves from California Pinot Noirs for so long, vintners are reluctant to make it. The grape is temperamental to the point that even fine wine makers with finer vineyards were giving up, accepting the theory that California and Pinot Noir were simply not made for each other. Much of the acreage was pulled in favor of such popular varieties as Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay.
FOOD
March 24, 1994 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Kosher wine has improved dramatically in the last decade, and now the best of it can take its place beside the best non-kosher wine. These days, makers of kosher wine insist their wines aren't just for Passover anymore. Traditionally, kosher wine has not been fine wine. Most of the Jews fleeing Eastern Europe 100 years ago came here by way of Ellis Island. And the only kosher wine made on the East Coast was a syrupy dessert wine based on Concord grapes.
FOOD
May 19, 1988 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
A few months ago, about two dozen California wine makers gathered for a wine tasting were asked to vote for the top 15 California wineries whose wines had achieved a level of excellence over time. Nobody mentioned Sterling Vineyards, and when the name was brought up, one wine maker sneered and said, "I'll never touch another Seagram product as long as I live." Sterling is owned by the Seagram Classics Wine Co., a division of Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, a New York-based distiller.
FOOD
September 23, 1993 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
When the idea of recognizing the Carneros region as an American Viticultural Appellation first surfaced, it didn't appear to have much going for it. There was but one winery and fewer than 1,000 acres of vines when the application was submitted in 1979. What's more, Carneros didn't follow any existing boundaries, embracing parts of the southern ends of both Napa and Sonoma counties--at the time painted as the Hatfields and McCoys of the wine world.
TRAVEL
December 31, 2000 | ANN COSTELLO, Ann Costello is a freelance writer based in Beverly Hills
"We're under a giant black cloud," my husband, Dick, observed as he turned our car into this Napa Valley village. We were looking for the Vintage Inn, where we would spend the next three nights, and we hoped the rain would hold off until we unloaded our car. Drenching rain and cold days were not what we had in mind when we and 11 other art-loving couples from Los Angeles planned this visit. It was late October, harvest time, when sun-filled days are the norm.
TRAVEL
June 15, 2008 | Jenn Garbee, Special to The Times
Every time my husband, Kevin, and I visit the Napa Valley, we leave with a newfound appreciation for the local arts: the art of wine making, the art of wine country cuisine, the art of wine-and-food pairing. With so many temptations, we've never put down our wine glasses long enough to appreciate the other local achievement: the fine arts. On a recent visit, we made a concerted effort to push away from the tasting-room bar and ponder the next Picassos.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|