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Rene Preval

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OPINION
January 7, 1996
In "Haiti Elected a New President, But Can He Replace Aristide?" (Opinion, Dec. 24), J.P. Slavin completely misses the significance of Rene Preval's election to Haiti's highest office. Slavin questions whether Preval is President Aristide's "protege" or "acolyte." In fact he is neither. It was Preval who convinced a reluctant Aristide to run for the presidency in 1990 and it was Preval who as prime minister and interior minister in 1991 led efforts to eradicate the corrupting influence of the Tontons Macoutes from the governmental apparatus.
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WORLD
January 16, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Haiti is locked in a political crisis that threatens to further stall recovery from the devastating earthquake of a year ago and could swiftly turn violent. Seven weeks after a flawed presidential election, President Rene Preval is resisting an international panel's recommendation that his handpicked candidate be removed from a runoff, according to diplomatic sources. Preval also is saying he intends to remain in office beyond his term. Haiti desperately needs to seat a new government to move ahead in the reconstruction of its quake-ravaged capital, where hundreds of thousands of people languish in vast tent cities, and to improve the disbursement of aid money, analysts say. The core of the dispute now is over which candidates qualify for the runoff to the Nov. 28 vote and whether fraud was so extensive that the entire process should be discarded and done over.
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NEWS
September 28, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rene Preval, the prime minister whose policies during exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's first year in office were so controversial that they contributed to Aristide's violent overthrow, is now under consideration for the same job, Haitian political sources say. Preval, a onetime baker and political radical whose very name generates vitriol even among political moderates, is one of six candidates to fill the prime minister post when Aristide is restored to office.
OPINION
January 16, 2011 | By Amy Wilentz
Here's what's wrong with Haiti right now: A year after an earthquake ripped through the capital and nearby towns like an atomic bomb, killing an estimated 300,000 people, the Haitian government is wasting its limited energies politicking rather than working on a serious recovery plan. Pushed by an international community that wants to know what government it will be dealing with as promised foreign recovery monies come into the country, Haitian officials have fallen into a vortex of farcical horse-trading to determine who will next take hold of this bucking and plunging country and try to ride it into the future.
WORLD
February 12, 2006 | Carol J. Williams and Chantal Regnault, Special to The Times
With one presidential term behind him and his campaign for a return to power undertaken with reluctance, Rene Preval has made clear he has no illusions about the daunting challenges that lie ahead for the next leader of Haiti.
WORLD
July 25, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Shoeless boys with angry eyes and empty stomachs no longer loiter outside the green iron gates of the National Palace. The odd jobs of oppression have disappeared. In the unfamiliar atmosphere of peace, there are no more orders to bash heads or crush dissent that once earned the ragtag enforcers a plate of rice and beans or a tube of glue to sniff. A year into his second tenure as president, Rene Preval has broken ranks with two centuries of despots and demagogues.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Priest-turned-president Jean-Bertrand Aristide handed the sash of leadership Wednesday to Haiti's new president, bearded agronomist Rene Garcia Preval, in the nation's first peaceful, democratic succession since its independence in 1804.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | Associated Press
Bypassing a hostile Parliament, Haitian President Rene Preval told the nation that he will create a new government by decree. Hours later, motorcycle gunmen opened fire Tuesday on Preval's sister's car, wounding her and killing the driver. Preval's announcement late Monday aimed to break a 19-month stalemate that has left Haiti without a functioning government and halted the flow of aid to this impoverished Caribbean nation.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Rene Preval appointed a new government by decree Thursday in an attempt to end nearly two years of crisis and regain the confidence of the international community. Haiti's new government, packed with Preval allies, was immediately criticized by his political opponents. Yet it probably will be welcomed by Haiti's business sector and an international community frustrated by Haiti's prolonged political stalemate.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
With inaugural celebrations over, Haitian President Rene Garcia Preval began the serious job of trying to rebuild his country's shattered economy. Political analysts say naming a Cabinet, defining economic policy and streamlining the bloated bureaucracy will require Preval's immediate action.
WORLD
August 15, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
Haitian President Rene Preval peers off and rubs his beard when he thinks about those 35 seconds when the earth convulsed. Preval was feeding his 8-month-old granddaughter dinner in the courtyard of the presidential mansion. They were thrown to the ground as the house collapsed. Unable to reach anyone on the phone, Preval jumped on the back of a motorcycle taxi and directed the driver toward downtown. Wending through the rubble in the dark, he couldn't comprehend the scope of death and ruin.
WORLD
March 10, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama pledged to stand by Haiti as it recovered from its devastating earthquake, assuring the stricken nation's president today that the U.S. would not turn its back on neighbors in a time of need. The situation on the ground "remains dire," Obama said after a morning meeting with President Rene Preval, noting that many Haitians were still in desperate need of shelter, food and medicine as the spring rainy season approached. "That's why, even as the U.S. military responsibly hands off relief functions to our Haitian and international partners, America's commitment to Haiti's recovery and reconstruction must endure and will endure, Obama said, standing side by side with Preval in the Rose Garden.
WORLD
January 20, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Seated under a mango tree with helicopters and cargo planes thundering overhead, Haitian President Rene Preval had few answers to the many questions facing the head of a devastated country. He could not say how many people had died. He did not know when the roads would be cleared of debris. He wouldn't venture a guess on whether more survivors might still be pulled from the rubble. "We haven't ended the rescue operations, but we know that as the days pass, the chances are getting smaller and smaller," the president told The Times, speaking after a news conference held at what serves as his government's headquarters: a guarded police station behind cinder-block walls near the airport.
WORLD
July 25, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Shoeless boys with angry eyes and empty stomachs no longer loiter outside the green iron gates of the National Palace. The odd jobs of oppression have disappeared. In the unfamiliar atmosphere of peace, there are no more orders to bash heads or crush dissent that once earned the ragtag enforcers a plate of rice and beans or a tube of glue to sniff. A year into his second tenure as president, Rene Preval has broken ranks with two centuries of despots and demagogues.
WORLD
June 26, 2006 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Just a short walk from the gang-ruled slum he calls home, on a street he was afraid to tread less than six months ago, Eligene Mondesir has found the first paying job of his 55-year lifetime. It's smelly, exhausting work, shoveling garbage from the gutters in the withering tropical heat. But Mondesir, like the 1,750 others hired by a foreign relief group, is grateful for the $2 daily wage that allows him to feed more than a dozen family members.
WORLD
May 15, 2006 | Carol J. Williams and Chantal Regnault, Special to The Times
Rene Preval was sworn in Sunday as Haiti's president for the second time, restoring legitimacy to the troubled nation's government after more than two years of anarchy and violence that followed the flight of Jean-Bertrand Aristide to escape an armed rebellion.
WORLD
February 9, 2006 | From Associated Press
A spokesman for former Haitian President Rene Preval said Wednesday that unconfirmed early results showed him with a wide lead in the country's presidential race. The claim from Preval's team could not be verified, but some polling stations posted results that showed strong early support for him. Many ballots were still being carried in from remote polling places by plane, truck and mule, and final results might not be available until Friday.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, in a rushed trip to Haiti, lectured the country's president and politicians Friday to reach a compromise and break the political impasse that has paralyzed the government and economy of this troubled Caribbean nation. Repeating the message she delivered to President Rene Preval and members of the Haitian congress, she told reporters: "Disputes are the lifeblood of democracy. But Haiti has gone too long with its stalemate."
WORLD
February 23, 2006 | Carol J. Williams and Chantal Regnault, Special to The Times
Ousted President JeanBertrand Aristide has the constitutional right to return to Haiti whenever he chooses but may want to keep in mind that charges have been filed against him, President-elect Rene Preval said Wednesday. In his first major public statement since being declared the winner last week of a Feb.
WORLD
February 20, 2006 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Robert Manuel doesn't say much, but his omnipresence at the side of President-elect Rene Preval speaks volumes about the next head of state's newfound independence. Manuel was national security chief in the first years of Preval's 1996-2001 presidency but was forced to resign after a crackdown on drug traffickers netted some loyalists of Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who served as president before and after Preval.
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