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Rene Theodore

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NEWS
January 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
Haitian politicians on Sunday reacted angrily to a police assault on a political meeting, saying this raises questions about whether the interim government has security forces under control. The victim of the attack, Rene Theodore, head of Haiti's Communist Party but considered a moderate, said, "We have to know whether or not the country is being held hostage by thugs."
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NEWS
February 27, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has undercut his importance here by refusing to accept a continued role for the current military leadership, his foes and some supporters say. Under an agreement signed with his opposition over the weekend in Washington, it was implied that--in exchange for his ultimate restoration as president--Aristide would accept Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras as Haiti's military commander.
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NEWS
January 5, 1992 | From Reuters
Exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has agreed to accept a leading opponent as prime minister, opening the way for a solution to Haiti's three-month-old crisis, parliamentary critics said Saturday. But Aristide supporters were less sure that a breakthrough was imminent, and cautioned that Aristide's critics seemed to be ignoring the conditions he would set for such an agreement.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
Haitian politicians on Sunday reacted angrily to a police assault on a political meeting, saying this raises questions about whether the interim government has security forces under control. The victim of the attack, Rene Theodore, head of Haiti's Communist Party but considered a moderate, said, "We have to know whether or not the country is being held hostage by thugs."
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DONALD SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The secretary general of the Organization of American States said Wednesday that an OAS-brokered deal between Haiti's ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the Haitian political establishment may restore legitimate government to the impoverished island within a week and possibly clear the way for Aristide's return.
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Haiti is so screwed up," the senior Haitian army officer told the foreign official, "that when communism has failed all over the world, Haiti is naming a Communist as prime minister." "Communism, shmomunism," scoffed another foreign official. "Who cares?" These contrasting views exemplify the division and shifting of traditional positions that mark the crucial maneuverings over what is called here "The Solution." They refer to a plan to end the crisis that began Sept.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American-supported agreement designed to end Haiti's political crisis and return the country's first democratically elected president from forced exile was put in serious jeopardy on Thursday when legislative leaders backed away from the accord. A three-day meeting in Caracas, Venezuela, ended Wednesday night with Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, overthrown in a violent coup on Sept. 30, agreeing with legislative opponents on a new prime minister, Rene Theodore.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has undercut his importance here by refusing to accept a continued role for the current military leadership, his foes and some supporters say. Under an agreement signed with his opposition over the weekend in Washington, it was implied that--in exchange for his ultimate restoration as president--Aristide would accept Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras as Haiti's military commander.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | Associated Press
Prime Minister-designate Rene Theodore and ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide are to meet today in Washington in an attempt to untangle Haiti's political crisis. Theodore left Thursday afternoon on a commercial flight and is to meet Aristide at the offices of the Organization of American States. The OAS called a hemispheric trade embargo against Haiti after Aristide, the country's first freely elected president, was ousted in a Sept. 30 military coup after less than eight months in office.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | United Press International
Police fired rubber bullets and tear gas Saturday to break up about 100 protesters who were singing hymns and demanding the resignation of Haiti's interim government, radio reports said. The demonstration was the second anti-government protest held in the capital in as many days. About 100 protesters, most of them youths, were praying and singing hymns in front of the National Palace about 1 p.m.
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Haiti is so screwed up," the senior Haitian army officer told the foreign official, "that when communism has failed all over the world, Haiti is naming a Communist as prime minister." "Communism, shmomunism," scoffed another foreign official. "Who cares?" These contrasting views exemplify the division and shifting of traditional positions that mark the crucial maneuverings over what is called here "The Solution." They refer to a plan to end the crisis that began Sept.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American-supported agreement designed to end Haiti's political crisis and return the country's first democratically elected president from forced exile was put in serious jeopardy on Thursday when legislative leaders backed away from the accord. A three-day meeting in Caracas, Venezuela, ended Wednesday night with Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, overthrown in a violent coup on Sept. 30, agreeing with legislative opponents on a new prime minister, Rene Theodore.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DONALD SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The secretary general of the Organization of American States said Wednesday that an OAS-brokered deal between Haiti's ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the Haitian political establishment may restore legitimate government to the impoverished island within a week and possibly clear the way for Aristide's return.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | From Reuters
Exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has agreed to accept a leading opponent as prime minister, opening the way for a solution to Haiti's three-month-old crisis, parliamentary critics said Saturday. But Aristide supporters were less sure that a breakthrough was imminent, and cautioned that Aristide's critics seemed to be ignoring the conditions he would set for such an agreement.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide began negotiations with Haitian Parliament leaders Saturday, but prospects appeared dim for a quick break in the five-month crisis that has followed his ouster. An Organization of American States negotiator said during a break in the meetings, which were to continue today, that "some progress" was made.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992
Since a military junta ousted the democratically elected Jean-Bertrand Aristide as president of Haiti in September, the island nation seems to have been in a vale of tears. Thousands of Haitian refugees have tried to pour into the United States in desperate attempts to escape life-threatening violence and numbing poverty. Now there is hope, however fragile, that Aristide might be returned to his rightful post in a deal brokered by the Organization of American States.
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