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Renee Rosnes

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Pianist Renee Rosnes' success is remarkable on many levels. She's one of the few Canadian jazz artists to achieve international acceptance. More important, she's one of the few women instrumentalists to emerge in recent years with her own group and her own albums. "Yes, I've been pretty fortunate," Rosnes says. "I haven't come face to face with any problems, though I've heard that a lot of women have. Sometimes you have to prove yourself a little more (as a woman).
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2002 | DON HECKMAN
Canadian-born pianist Renee Rosnes has one of the most enviable resumes in jazz. Among the many musical associations it lists are pairings with the likes of Joe Henderson, Wayne Shorter, Branford Marsalis, James Moody and J.J. Johnson. In addition, Rosnes has released a series of well-crafted, musically imaginative recordings that feature her crisp, bop-based improvisation and envelope-stretching compositions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a jazz musician gets together with a string section, don't look for a set full of heated solos. Over the years, recording jazz players with strings has been based around a single concept: pick about a dozen great standards, write soothing string accompaniments designed to be played at a slow to medium tempo, and let the soloist shine. Among the greats who have done it: Charlie Parker, Clifford Brown and Bill Evans.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a jazz musician gets together with a string section, don't look for a set full of heated solos. Over the years, recording jazz players with strings has been based around a single concept: pick about a dozen great standards, write soothing string accompaniments designed to be played at a slow to medium tempo, and let the soloist shine. Among the greats who have done it: Charlie Parker, Clifford Brown and Bill Evans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2002 | DON HECKMAN
Canadian-born pianist Renee Rosnes has one of the most enviable resumes in jazz. Among the many musical associations it lists are pairings with the likes of Joe Henderson, Wayne Shorter, Branford Marsalis, James Moody and J.J. Johnson. In addition, Rosnes has released a series of well-crafted, musically imaginative recordings that feature her crisp, bop-based improvisation and envelope-stretching compositions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | Leonard Feather
This is Rosnes' first album as a leader, and the Vancouver-trained pianist takes full advantage of it. Her approach is mainly an extension of 1970s bop; her companions include Branford Marsalis on two tunes and Ralph Bowen's muscular tenor on three others. Driving solos on her own "I.A. Blues" and Cole Porter's "Everything I Love" as well as a fluent examination of Joe Henderson's "Punjab" are highlights.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990 | Don Heckman
The results of pianist Rosnes' follow-up to her Blue Note debut, are generally felicitous. Backed by her regular trio members--bassist Ira Coleman and drummer Billy Drummond--she scores on pieces like "Summer Night" and "Malaga Moon," which abundantly illustrate the Bill Evans influences of her piano playing. The precise, understated style of the trio is less effective in support of tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson, who appears on most of the tracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
* * * * Vincent Herring, "Secret Love," Musicmasters. Herring's alto sax and Renee Rosnes' piano here have an innovative sound and style. With fine support from bassist Ira Coleman and drummer Billy Drummond, they cover Strayhorn's "Chelsea Bridge," Miles Davis' "Solar" and a take-no-prisoners version of the title track. A slashing Kenny Barron blues, "And Then Again," winds things up. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four stars (excellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
While nobody is likely to relate to the entire album, this is an effective reminder of the trumpeter's Dizzy Gillespie-inspired virtuosity. Diversity reigns. Faddis stretches the sonic limits on a supercharged "High Five," pays homage to Miles Davis on "Dewey's Dance," raps, albeit trivially, with Gillespie on "Rapartee" and displays his admirable ballad horn in "Forevermore." Shuttling his selections between straight-ahead and funk, Faddis is clearly aiming at providing something for everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
JOE HENDERSON "The Blue Note Years" Blue Note * * * This four-CD box (4 1/2 hours of music) includes 36 cuts, all but the final 25 minutes being classics from the 1960s. Though Henderson is the leader on only 10 tracks, his tenor is prominent throughout on selections led by Bobby Hutcherson, Duke Pearson, Andrew Hill et al. The set could as well have been issued as "Best of Blue Note."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Pianist Renee Rosnes' success is remarkable on many levels. She's one of the few Canadian jazz artists to achieve international acceptance. More important, she's one of the few women instrumentalists to emerge in recent years with her own group and her own albums. "Yes, I've been pretty fortunate," Rosnes says. "I haven't come face to face with any problems, though I've heard that a lot of women have. Sometimes you have to prove yourself a little more (as a woman).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990 | Don Heckman
The results of pianist Rosnes' follow-up to her Blue Note debut, are generally felicitous. Backed by her regular trio members--bassist Ira Coleman and drummer Billy Drummond--she scores on pieces like "Summer Night" and "Malaga Moon," which abundantly illustrate the Bill Evans influences of her piano playing. The precise, understated style of the trio is less effective in support of tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson, who appears on most of the tracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | Leonard Feather
This is Rosnes' first album as a leader, and the Vancouver-trained pianist takes full advantage of it. Her approach is mainly an extension of 1970s bop; her companions include Branford Marsalis on two tunes and Ralph Bowen's muscular tenor on three others. Driving solos on her own "I.A. Blues" and Cole Porter's "Everything I Love" as well as a fluent examination of Joe Henderson's "Punjab" are highlights.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
Catalina, the only chance-taking jazz room in town, has sprung a surprise this week in the form of the Buster Williams Quintet. A veteran of dozens of name groups--Herbie Hancock, Dexter Gordon, McCoy Tyner--Williams has long been known for the depth and power of his sound on bass, the resiliency of his beat and flawless intonation. As a leader, he not only furnished some of the most inventive solos but also wrote all the music.
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