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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2012 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - On 7,300 isolated acres in eastern Kern County, a plan for dozens of wind turbines 20 stories high to generate enough electricity for tens of thousands of homes may hinge on who is elected president. Millions of dollars have been spent laying the groundwork. Permits are in order, contractors are lined up, government planners are on board. But like many other green energy efforts in California, the Avalon Wind Project awaits the fate of key federal subsidies. For Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, such aid represents government run amok, allowing bureaucrats to pick winners and losers in renewable energy rather than letting the free market sort them out. Romney has not offered many specifics about what he would cut, but his opposition in general to aid for alternative energy production has been a pillar of his campaign.
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OPINION
March 26, 2014 | By Mark Butler
After nearly 38 years working for the National Park Service, I hung up my "flat hat" this month and retired as superintendent of Joshua Tree National Park. That means I can now speak out against pending proposals with the potential to harm our country's most spectacular national parks in the California desert. My experience in the National Park System began right out of high school, when I spent a season patrolling the mountainous trails of Yosemite National Park's backcountry as a wilderness ranger.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2010
Gov.-elect Jerry Brown's plan to create jobs relies on an expansion of renewable energy in California. The energy plan, introduced during his campaign, contains few details but includes: Generating enough new renewable energy within California to serve more than 30% of current peak energy demand Reducing energy consumption in existing homes by 40% Revising energy-efficiency standards for new homes and commercial buildings...
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Shan Li
The use of clean energy technology has seen a sharp rise in military sites in the U.S., as the armed forces push into green sources of power around the country, a report said. The Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. have looked for ways to reduce its energy bills in recent years even as the Pentagon's budget is squeezed. Combined, the U.S. military goes through $4 billion worth of power on its bases, according to a report from Pew Charitable Trusts. The armed forces have moved to quickly adopt green energy solutions, the report said.
OPINION
February 23, 2011
California is blessed with renewable energy resources that it has barely begun to harvest, an enlightened electorate that understands the importance of doing so and a venture-capital community eager to make green investments. In fact, the state has everything it needs to lead the world in clean energy development, except for one thing: a functional government. The Legislature isn't just bad at passing budgets; it's bad at moving major legislation even when it's favored by a strong majority of lawmakers and the public.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Shan Li
The use of clean energy technology has seen a sharp rise in military sites in the U.S., as the armed forces push into green sources of power around the country, a report said. The Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. have looked for ways to reduce its energy bills in recent years even as the Pentagon's budget is squeezed. Combined, the U.S. military goes through $4 billion worth of power on its bases, according to a report from Pew Charitable Trusts. The armed forces have moved to quickly adopt green energy solutions, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
A mandate that California utilities increase their use of renewable energy sailed through the state Assembly on Tuesday and is headed for the governor's desk. Environmental groups say the legislation is the most ambitious of its kind in the country. It would require the state's electricity companies to provide 33% of power from renewable resources by the year 2020. State law now sets a 20% goal. Supporters made their case by invoking the nuclear plant problems in Japan and conflict in the oil-rich Middle East, as well as the struggling California economy: Environmentalists have said the mandate could create 100,000 jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
The state Senate acted Thursday to require California utilities to boost their use of wind, solar and other renewable energy sources to a third of total supply by the year 2020. California law already requires utilities to get a fifth of their power from renewable energy. If this measure becomes law, utilities will be forced to lean even more heavily on green power ? improving air quality and helping the economy in the process, supporters said. "Right now we can begin to create the jobs that this state so desperately needs," said state Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto)
SCIENCE
June 12, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Ratepayers can monitor the progress of California's utilities as they move toward meeting the state's renewable energy goals. The first compliance period is at the end of the year, when utilities are required to purchase an average of 20% of retail energy from renewable resources. The Renewable Portfolio Standards compliance periods: 25% by Dec. 31, 2016; 33% by Dec. 31, 2020; and no less than 33% in all subsequent years. The state Energy Commission offers an online tool to follow it all, with data obtained from the utilities from self-reporting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Millions of dollars in renewable energy projects intended to provide power to facilities in California's national parks and forests are sitting idle because of a years-long squabble with Southern California Edison. A new $800,000 solar project at Death Valley National Park, photovoltaic panels at the state-of-the art visitors center at Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area and a solar power system at the U.S. Forest Service's new facility at Mono Lake are among dozens of taxpayer-funded projects in Southern California on hold as the federal agencies try to hash out an agreement with SCE to tie the projects to the state's electrical grid.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
After coping with the June shutdown of the San Onofre nuclear power plant near San Clemente, the fallout from a fatal 2010 explosion of a natural gas pipeline in the Bay Area and a batch of consumer protection issues, the state's Public Utilities Commission faces more challenges in the year ahead. And on the spot will be PUC President Michael R. Peevey, 75, who has served as California's chief utility regulator under three governors. He will have been the longest-serving head of the agency by the time his term expires at the end of next year.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2013 | By Shan Li
Solar and wind farms scored a victory Friday when the Interior Department announced an extension of permits which allow renewable energy projects to accidentally kill or injure bald eagles without penalty. Renewable energy companies will now be able to obtain permits good for up to 30 years, a sharp jump from the previous five-year maximum. In a statement, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the permitting change will "help the renewable energy industry and others develop projects that can operate in a longer term, while ensuring bald and golden eagles continue to thrive.
OPINION
December 6, 2013
Re "Clean energy could choke the grid," Dec. 3 The Times ignores the fact that extreme weather, not renewables, poses the biggest threat to the nation's energy grid. Regardless of the energy source, the grid requires smart management and investment. Predicting mechanical problems at the many aging power plants can be tricky. Imagine asking a mechanic to foresee every problem with a 40-year-old car. System managers are becoming more sophisticated at forecasting weather patterns and are already integrating large quantities of renewables with no reliability impacts.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - In a sprawling complex of laboratories and futuristic gadgets in Golden, Colo., a supercomputer named Peregrine does a quadrillion calculations per second to help scientists figure out how to keep the lights on. Peregrine was turned on this year by the U.S. Energy Department. It has the world's largest "petascale" computing capability. It is the size of a Mack truck. Its job is to figure out how to cope with a risk from something the public generally thinks of as benign - renewable energy.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California lawmakers are poised to pass legislation that could dramatically affect bills for millions of residential customers of Southern California Edison Co. and other state-regulated utilities. People living in temperate climates along the coast would probably see higher bills. Those in torrid regions - the San Joaquin Valley, the Inland Empire and the Mojave Desert - would get some rate relief. Exactly how much rates would change would be left to the Public Utilities Commission after it conducts a detailed, technical investigation.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
The pilots of the first solar-powered plane to fly across America hope to transform the momentum of their historic flight into a grand-scale push for clean technology.       Solar Impulse pilot and project president Bertrand Piccard said his team was “elated” by the smooth landing at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on Saturday night from an aviation and a renewable-energy standpoint. “It really shows our clean-technology solar energy and our new systems have been reliable,” he said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The state's electric utilities will be required to get at least a third of their power from wind, solar and other renewable resources by 2020, under an executive order signed this afternoon by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "With this action, we will ensure that California remains the pioneer in clean energy and clean jobs," the governor said just before signing the order. But his call for California to set the nation's toughest renewable energy standard didn't generate much enthusiasm from Democratic lawmakers and environmentalist activists, who have labored for the last nine months to pass a pair of bills that they contended would create tens of thousands of new "green" jobs in the Golden State.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
The U.S. still lagged behind other nations in 2011 in the share of energy it gets from renewable sources, in spite of a more than 300% increase in funding for green power projects over the last decade. That's the finding of a report released Monday by the Natural Resources Defense Council, which looked at green power efforts in both advanced and emerging economies around the world. European countries still have massive debt programs, double-dip recessions and fragile banking systems, but the NRDC found that those problems haven't stopped them from getting much higher percentages of their total energy production from renewable sources.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
It's one thing to hear a legislator or industrialist extol "clean nuclear energy"; it's something else when the person singing those praises is an environmentalist. In "Pandora's Promise," Robert Stone has gathered the testimony of five people whose change of heart on the matter reflects his own (a quarter-century ago his "Radio Bikini" was a protest against atomic weapons). Writers and environmentalists, they speak with conviction, if not always convincingly, of nuclear power's necessity as a viable alternative to fossil fuel.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By Shan Li
Renewable energy investments are heading toward developing countries that want to transition from pricey fossil fuels, a report said. China led the way with $67 billion spent on solar, wind and other clean energy projects, more than half of the total $112 million spent in 2012 among emerging nations, according to Bloomberg, citing the United Nations. That's rapidly catching up with the $132 billion shelled out last year by developed nations such as the United States and Britain. And of the 138 countries that have set renewable energy goals, one-third are developing nations, the report said.
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