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BUSINESS
September 14, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
After vowing to veto this year's biggest environmental bill, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is expected to issue an executive order by midweek that would require all electric utilities to generate a third of their power from renewable resources, such as wind and solar power, by 2020. The order presumably would set no limit on how much of the green power could be imported from other states. Environmentalists, who have been told about the governor's still-evolving plans, said Schwarzenegger also was considering directing the California Air Resources Board to look at broadening the state's definition of renewable energy sources to include large hydroelectric dams and nuclear energy plants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
The energy landscape of Southern California will look vastly different without San Onofre, officials said in a state Senate committee hearing Wednesday, the first in a series of public discussions on life without the nuclear plant. The 2,200-megawatt behemoth in northern San Diego County brought a steady supply of power to about 1.4 million homes until equipment problems forced it to close in early 2012. But the plant's owner, Southern California Edison, announced last month that it would be permanently retired.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 2006 | From Reuters
California's investor-owned utilities will be allowed to pass on to customers the costs of building lines to transmit renewable power from sources such as wind farms, the California Public Utilities Commission ruled Thursday. The wind farm being developed at Tehachapi will cost an estimated $1 billion to connect to the grid, and the commission's ruling will allow utilities to make the deals needed to recover power-line costs when several companies share lines and costs.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Ratepayers can monitor the progress of California's utilities as they move toward meeting the state's renewable energy goals. The first compliance period is at the end of the year, when utilities are required to purchase an average of 20% of retail energy from renewable resources. The Renewable Portfolio Standards compliance periods: 25% by Dec. 31, 2016; 33% by Dec. 31, 2020; and no less than 33% in all subsequent years. The state Energy Commission offers an online tool to follow it all, with data obtained from the utilities from self-reporting.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Ratepayers can monitor the progress of California's utilities as they move toward meeting the state's renewable energy goals. The first compliance period is at the end of the year, when utilities are required to purchase an average of 20% of retail energy from renewable resources. The Renewable Portfolio Standards compliance periods: 25% by Dec. 31, 2016; 33% by Dec. 31, 2020; and no less than 33% in all subsequent years. The state Energy Commission offers an online tool to follow it all, with data obtained from the utilities from self-reporting.
OPINION
July 22, 2008
Re "The distraction of offshore drilling," Opinion, July 18 Offshore drilling is not a mistake, as Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) states. Expanded domestic drilling is essential to any long-term energy strategy, which will also include renewable resources, nuclear development and responsible individual choices. Offshore drilling techniques have improved greatly in the last 30 years, allowing companies to tap our natural resources in a more environmentally friendly way. Domestic oil development requires leases that have a decent chance to be productive and profitable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1985
I am in perpetual awe of man's arrogance. The question is not whether animals are useful to medical research. That assertion is highly debatable and is debated in many quarters. But it is rather whether we are to assume that animals may be exploited in this manner as a "given," with no doubt or second thoughts about the truth of this axiom. There are moral and ethical issues here that go quite a way beyond whether this institution or that lab will or will not get their funding.
HOME & GARDEN
August 3, 1996 | From Associated Press
Americans consider recycled furniture to be pieces rescued from Grandma's attic, picked up at garage sales or purchased as fine antiques. Now there are other forms to ponder. New pieces are being made from old wood or from other materials that don't rob nature or otherwise harm the environment. This year, the first in the eight years that it has been in New York, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair mounted a display of about 25 such products.
OPINION
January 3, 2009
Re "Water, oil don't mix in Rockies," Dec. 28 Metaphorically speaking, oil doesn't mix with anything except oil companies, oil money and oil dependence. It already has been established that a lack of potable water is one of the biggest threats we face on this planet. So who stands to gain by using this resource to extract an outdated source of energy that destroys our ecosystem? I think we know. Shell Oil Communications and Sustainability Manager Tracy C. Boyd states, with cavalier nonchalance, that "as long as we continue to be a nation hooked on liquid fuel, we need to look at anything we can do to tap the resources of energy in this country."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
The energy landscape of Southern California will look vastly different without San Onofre, officials said in a state Senate committee hearing Wednesday, the first in a series of public discussions on life without the nuclear plant. The 2,200-megawatt behemoth in northern San Diego County brought a steady supply of power to about 1.4 million homes until equipment problems forced it to close in early 2012. But the plant's owner, Southern California Edison, announced last month that it would be permanently retired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2010 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
Even if voters decide to suspend California's landmark global warming law at the polls in November, most of its goals to reduce greenhouse gases can still be met, according to experts. Such a vote would be a political blow to the governor and environmentalists, undermining their campaign to expand California's greenhouse gas reduction efforts here and elsewhere, but it wouldn't freeze most of the pioneering programs that carry out the state's fight against global warming, said legislative analysts and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2009 | Mary McNamara, TELEVISION CRITIC
Some story lines just never get old -- star-crossed lovers, mistaken identity, lizard men from outer space. It's impossible to tiptoe around the main plot device of ABC's "V"# -- those aliens may be smart and purty but they're up to no good -- because it is, of course, a remake of the 1983 miniseries(The_Original_Miniseries). And even if it weren't, writers Kenneth Johnson and Scott Peters have infused the pilot with as many sly sci-fi references as CG special effects. Which are pretty terrific, as is the pilot in general.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
President Obama and administration officials today will announce $3.4 billion in spending projects to modernize the nation's electric power system. The president will offer details on funding for the "smart grid" during an appearance at a solar plant in Arcadia, Fla. White House officials said the projects would create tens of thousands of jobs in the near term and lay the groundwork for changing how Americans use and pay for energy. The spending is aimed at improving the efficiency and reliability of the U.S. power supply, and helping to create markets for wind and solar power, officials said.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The state's electric utilities will be required to get at least a third of their power from wind, solar and other renewable resources by 2020, under an executive order signed this afternoon by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "With this action, we will ensure that California remains the pioneer in clean energy and clean jobs," the governor said just before signing the order. But his call for California to set the nation's toughest renewable energy standard didn't generate much enthusiasm from Democratic lawmakers and environmentalist activists, who have labored for the last nine months to pass a pair of bills that they contended would create tens of thousands of new "green" jobs in the Golden State.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
After vowing to veto this year's biggest environmental bill, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is expected to issue an executive order by midweek that would require all electric utilities to generate a third of their power from renewable resources, such as wind and solar power, by 2020. The order presumably would set no limit on how much of the green power could be imported from other states. Environmentalists, who have been told about the governor's still-evolving plans, said Schwarzenegger also was considering directing the California Air Resources Board to look at broadening the state's definition of renewable energy sources to include large hydroelectric dams and nuclear energy plants.
OPINION
January 3, 2009
Re "Water, oil don't mix in Rockies," Dec. 28 Metaphorically speaking, oil doesn't mix with anything except oil companies, oil money and oil dependence. It already has been established that a lack of potable water is one of the biggest threats we face on this planet. So who stands to gain by using this resource to extract an outdated source of energy that destroys our ecosystem? I think we know. Shell Oil Communications and Sustainability Manager Tracy C. Boyd states, with cavalier nonchalance, that "as long as we continue to be a nation hooked on liquid fuel, we need to look at anything we can do to tap the resources of energy in this country."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2010 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
Even if voters decide to suspend California's landmark global warming law at the polls in November, most of its goals to reduce greenhouse gases can still be met, according to experts. Such a vote would be a political blow to the governor and environmentalists, undermining their campaign to expand California's greenhouse gas reduction efforts here and elsewhere, but it wouldn't freeze most of the pioneering programs that carry out the state's fight against global warming, said legislative analysts and others.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The state's electric utilities will be required to get at least a third of their power from wind, solar and other renewable resources by 2020, under an executive order signed this afternoon by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "With this action, we will ensure that California remains the pioneer in clean energy and clean jobs," the governor said just before signing the order. But his call for California to set the nation's toughest renewable energy standard didn't generate much enthusiasm from Democratic lawmakers and environmentalist activists, who have labored for the last nine months to pass a pair of bills that they contended would create tens of thousands of new "green" jobs in the Golden State.
OPINION
July 22, 2008
Re "The distraction of offshore drilling," Opinion, July 18 Offshore drilling is not a mistake, as Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) states. Expanded domestic drilling is essential to any long-term energy strategy, which will also include renewable resources, nuclear development and responsible individual choices. Offshore drilling techniques have improved greatly in the last 30 years, allowing companies to tap our natural resources in a more environmentally friendly way. Domestic oil development requires leases that have a decent chance to be productive and profitable.
FOOD
May 7, 2008 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
THERE'S been a changing of the guard at the Coleman Family Farm stand at the Santa Monica Farmers Market on Wednesday mornings. Ask Bill Coleman a question and he's likely to answer, "Ask Romey." Romey -- Romeo on his birth certificate -- is Coleman's son and though his eventually becoming the boss was expected, it nonetheless comes as a bit of a surprise to longtime market shoppers who might still think of him as the kid they watched grow up.
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