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Rennie Harris

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Dancer-choreographer Rennie Harris wants the world to know about hip-hop. That it's not just street dance but a culture, a way of life, whose history is longer, perhaps, than one might realize. Ya hear what I'm sayin'? Wanting to spread the H-word, Harris founded his Philadelphia-based troupe, Puremovement, in 1992. But during the last seven years, the award-winning performer has also been touring with an all-star lineup, "The Legends of Hip-Hop."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Dance, 10. Book, 3. Let's face it: If you're a show based on the lives of 16 hip-hop dancers and you're calling yourself a cross between "A Chorus Line" and "Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk," there had better be a thread of genius running through you. And in "Groovaloo," a world premiere that opened at the Falcon Theatre over the weekend, that thread is thin and stretched to the breaking point.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Ranging from the visceral to the visionary, the six dances in the current edition of "Black Choreographers Moving Toward the 21st Century" depict and distill African American experience with a deep sense of mission. Not the same mission, but always one that involves the audience in a new world of insights and feelings. At Cal State L.A. on Thursday, Winifred R. Harris' familiar trio "Thunder Is Not Yet Rain" evoked ancient, ancestral goddesses: women of power, sources of inspiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Dancer-choreographer Rennie Harris wants the world to know about hip-hop. That it's not just street dance but a culture, a way of life, whose history is longer, perhaps, than one might realize. Ya hear what I'm sayin'? Wanting to spread the H-word, Harris founded his Philadelphia-based troupe, Puremovement, in 1992. But during the last seven years, the award-winning performer has also been touring with an all-star lineup, "The Legends of Hip-Hop."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Dance, 10. Book, 3. Let's face it: If you're a show based on the lives of 16 hip-hop dancers and you're calling yourself a cross between "A Chorus Line" and "Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk," there had better be a thread of genius running through you. And in "Groovaloo," a world premiere that opened at the Falcon Theatre over the weekend, that thread is thin and stretched to the breaking point.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | ANNE MIDGETTE, Anne Midgette is a New York arts and culture writer
The scene is familiar: young men on a city street, dancing. They spin on the axis formed between head and shoulder, flex their arms in sinuous undulations and perform other feats of acrobatics for the crowd. Some people might call it break-dancing, although the correct term for this dance style, we learn, is b-boying. Whatever it is, it focuses on movement, with the body supporting itself on the ground through other means than the feet. In the 1980s, such groups of dancers were a common enough sight in the inner cities of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The dance forms -- tap, capoeira, gumboot and hip-hop -- spread like honey on a table. At least that's what UC Riverside dance professor Anna Scott pointed out while serving as tour guide to "Echo Africa: Dance From the Diaspora" on Saturday night at California Plaza as part of the Grand Performances free summer series. Well, maybe the journey was a bit zigzaggedy, but four acts whose dance forms have filial connections to Africa nevertheless put on a good show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In the same way that "Tango Argentino" gave audiences an authentic immersion in an idiom too often trivialized or debased in commercial entertainment, Rennie Harris' "Facing Mekka" offers a redemptive and ultimately inspiring vision of hip-hop music and dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2000 | ANNE MIDGETTE, Anne Midgette is a New York arts and culture writer
The scene is familiar: young men on a city street, dancing. They spin on the axis formed between head and shoulder, flex their arms in sinuous undulations and perform other feats of acrobatics for the crowd. Some people might call it break-dancing, although the correct term for this dance style, we learn, is b-boying. Whatever it is, it focuses on movement, with the body supporting itself on the ground through other means than the feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
It seems appropriate that Rennie Harris, artistic director of Rennie Harris Puremovement hip-hop dance company, would give a moving interview -- that is, from a cell phone while riding in a Philadelphia taxicab on his way to the company studios, located in a former Quaker school building on Lancaster Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The dance forms -- tap, capoeira, gumboot and hip-hop -- spread like honey on a table. At least that's what UC Riverside dance professor Anna Scott pointed out while serving as tour guide to "Echo Africa: Dance From the Diaspora" on Saturday night at California Plaza as part of the Grand Performances free summer series. Well, maybe the journey was a bit zigzaggedy, but four acts whose dance forms have filial connections to Africa nevertheless put on a good show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In the same way that "Tango Argentino" gave audiences an authentic immersion in an idiom too often trivialized or debased in commercial entertainment, Rennie Harris' "Facing Mekka" offers a redemptive and ultimately inspiring vision of hip-hop music and dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
It seems appropriate that Rennie Harris, artistic director of Rennie Harris Puremovement hip-hop dance company, would give a moving interview -- that is, from a cell phone while riding in a Philadelphia taxicab on his way to the company studios, located in a former Quaker school building on Lancaster Avenue.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | ANNE MIDGETTE, Anne Midgette is a New York arts and culture writer
The scene is familiar: young men on a city street, dancing. They spin on the axis formed between head and shoulder, flex their arms in sinuous undulations and perform other feats of acrobatics for the crowd. Some people might call it break-dancing, although the correct term for this dance style, we learn, is b-boying. Whatever it is, it focuses on movement, with the body supporting itself on the ground through other means than the feet. In the 1980s, such groups of dancers were a common enough sight in the inner cities of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2000 | ANNE MIDGETTE, Anne Midgette is a New York arts and culture writer
The scene is familiar: young men on a city street, dancing. They spin on the axis formed between head and shoulder, flex their arms in sinuous undulations and perform other feats of acrobatics for the crowd. Some people might call it break-dancing, although the correct term for this dance style, we learn, is b-boying. Whatever it is, it focuses on movement, with the body supporting itself on the ground through other means than the feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Ranging from the visceral to the visionary, the six dances in the current edition of "Black Choreographers Moving Toward the 21st Century" depict and distill African American experience with a deep sense of mission. Not the same mission, but always one that involves the audience in a new world of insights and feelings. At Cal State L.A. on Thursday, Winifred R. Harris' familiar trio "Thunder Is Not Yet Rain" evoked ancient, ancestral goddesses: women of power, sources of inspiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2003 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles photographer Catherine Opie, Philadelphia hip-hop dancer and choreographer Rennie Harris, and New York-based jazz pianist, composer and improviser Vijay Iyer are among the winners of this year's Alpert Awards in the Arts. Also on the list are Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist Coco Fusco and playwright, poet and performer Carl Hancock Rux, also of Brooklyn.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1995 | LEWIS SEGAL
More than celebrating African roots, Chuck Davis' seven-city DanceAfrica America festival reaffirms the values in African culture--and shows how they've endured far from the motherland. "This is not a concert, this is not a show, this is a sharing ," he said at the start of the program on Saturday at Cal State L.A., insisting that his audience be members of a responsive community rather than passive observers.
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