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NATIONAL
September 19, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Michael J. Mishak and Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
As identities of some of the dead from the Reno air race began to emerge Sunday, the National Transportation Safety Board said the doomed plane had two types of recording devices that might provide clues to what went wrong. At least nine people — pilot Jimmy Leeward and eight spectators — were killed Friday when the World War II-era Galloping Ghost veered skyward during a qualifying heat, then plunged into the box seats. Unlike most aircraft of the same size and vintage, Leeward's plane had a forward-facing video camera and a system that tracked the aircraft's engine and positioning, along with other data, the NTSB said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 16, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
RENO - Anele Brooks is one of the many who came back. A year after a vintage World War II fighter plane crashed at the annual air races here, killing 10 spectators and the pilot and injuring about 70 others, the San Luis Obispo-area woman sat in a box seat on the airport tarmac, not far from where the carnage occurred. And even now, she refused to flinch at the sky. She first came to this race in 1978, on the arm of her then-boyfriend. His friends told him back then that any date who could appreciate the beauty of those magnificent men in their flying machines was marriage material.
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NATIONAL
September 17, 2011 | By Michael Mishak and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Investigators were scrambling to determine what caused a powerful World War II vintage racing plane traveling at up to 400 mph to plunge toward spectators at the fabled Reno air races late Friday afternoon, leaving a shattered trail of twisted debris and broken bodies. At least three people were confirmed dead, including the pilot, and more than 50 were injured, about 15 of them critically. Because of the number and the extent of the injuries, the death toll could rise, officials said.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A year after a vintage World War II  fighter fell out of the sky , killing 10  spectators and the pilot, the National Championship Air Races in Reno have resumed -- with a greater emphasis on safety. This year's version of the races -- the 49th annual edition -- kicked off this week. The event usually brings out some 200,000 spectators and is worth $80 million to the Reno area, according to the group's website. Vintage planes will be racing at speeds of 500 mph in what promoters call "The World's Fastest Motorsport.” It was on the afternoon of Sept.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after Southwest Airlines ushered in a new era of lower fares at John Wayne Airport, another low-cost, no-frills carrier is poised on the runway. Reno Air, an upstart Nevada-based airline that has grown quickly since 1992, wants to operate an unspecified number of American Airline's flight slots from the Orange County airport.
TRAVEL
March 3, 1996
Beginning April 4, Reno Air plans to add five flights a day between Orange County and San Jose as part of the carrier's spring schedule. The new service will make a total of 11 daily flights between John Wayne Airport and San Jose International Airport. One-way fares start at $49 for tickets purchases 14 days in advance. Two flights will be added between Reno/Tahoe and Orange County for a total of three daily. One-way fares start at $56 for tickets purchased 14 days in advance.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Dan Weikel and Paul Pringle, Los Angeles Times
Ambulances were parked on the tarmac, ready for an accident. Inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration were milling around Reno-Stead Airport, looking for safety risks. The potential for trouble was so high that the National Transportation Safety Board sent investigators to the National Air Racing Championships just in case something went wrong. All the attention was focused on the possibility that a pilot could die, the kind of grim outcome that had occurred 19 times in the past.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1998 | Associated Press
A Reno-based holding company plans to sweeten American Airlines' offer for Reno Air to keep the hometown company in Nevada. Aviation Technologies Ltd. said it plans to offer $8.15 a share for the company's common stock, 40 cents more than American is proposing. "We think it's a $200-million to $220-million corporation," Aviation Technologies Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Kemp told the Reno Gazette-Journal. He called the American offer outrageous.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Board of Supervisors postponed until next week a decision on whether to allow a new low-fare airline into John Wayne Airport to give other airlines additional time to voice their concerns about the added competition. The issue is being closely watched because Reno Air's entry into the costly Orange County air market could be another welcome break for travelers.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | Bloomberg News
American Airlines is in negotiations to buy Reno Air Inc., according to Reno and a spokesman for American's pilots union. An acquisition would allow American to expand on the West Coast and to match the low-fare units other carriers have started up to compete with Southwest Airlines Co. Reno spokeswoman Nancy Raymond said negotiations with Dallas-based American, the nation's second-largest carrier, are continuing. Dan Carty, chief executive of American parent AMR Corp.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A year after an accident at the National Championship Air Races in Reno killed 11 people and injured dozens more, officials have implemented changes that they hope will improve the safety of an event in which airplanes can reach speeds of more than 500 mph and fly as low as 50 feet above the ground. The event has been under close scrutiny since a World War II-era P-51 Mustang flown by Jimmy Leeward, a 74-year-old Florida real estate developer, plunged into the crowd , killing himself and 10 spectators.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
Less than three weeks before the Sept. 12 start of the 2012 National Championship Air Races in Reno, federal investigators on Monday released a report on the cause of last year's spectacular crash at those races. The pilot and 10 people on the ground were killed; 70 were injured. The National Transportation Safety Board said that the failure of an aircraft tail structure on Hollywood stunt pilot Jimmy Leeward's souped-up World War II-era P-51 Mustang fighter was the probable cause of its Sept.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A year after a crash killed 11 and injured more than 70, the Reno Air Racing Assn. is planning to modify its race course to keep its fastest planes away from spectators, officials said Tuesday. Association director Mike Houghton said the group will ask federal regulators for permission to shift the largest course away from the crowd and to soften some of the curves. Houghton made his announcement as a panel appointed by the group released its list of safety recommendations. The association will hold its 49th annual National Championship Air Race beginning Sept.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Federal investigators issued seven recommendations Tuesday to improve the safety of the National Championship Air Races in Reno, where a highly modified World War II fighter plane plunged into spectators last year and killed 11 people, including the pilot. The National Transportation Safety Board called on the Reno Air Racing Assn. to review its 8.4-mile course to determine whether the risk to spectators could be reduced during races of powerful piston-engine aircraft in the so-called unlimited class.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Dan Weikel and Paul Pringle, Los Angeles Times
Ambulances were parked on the tarmac, ready for an accident. Inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration were milling around Reno-Stead Airport, looking for safety risks. The potential for trouble was so high that the National Transportation Safety Board sent investigators to the National Air Racing Championships just in case something went wrong. All the attention was focused on the possibility that a pilot could die, the kind of grim outcome that had occurred 19 times in the past.
OPINION
September 20, 2011
Symbol of courage Re "Valor in the 'kill zone,' " Sept. 16 How proud all Marines must be to see one of their own awarded the nation's highest military award, the Medal of Honor, in a ceremony at the White House — lest we forget our troops defending our freedom 24/7 in places far from home. As the father of an active-duty Marine, I am particularly awed by the actions of Dakota Meyer, and I thank God every day that there are still those among us who answer to a much higher calling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1993 | ED BOND
Reno Air, a new airline serving the West Coast, was given approval to begin service out of Burbank Airport Monday in a vote by the Burbank Airport Commission. The airline will start service with four daily, round-trip flights to San Francisco from Burbank on Oct. 15. Two of the flights continue on to Portland, and two continue to Seattle. The airport commission approved the new service by a 6-0 vote, with three commissioners absent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1998 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying it wanted to "be a good neighbor" to Burbank residents, Reno Air announced Monday that it is dropping plans for a 6:40 a.m. flight, delaying the takeoff until 7 a.m. to observe Burbank Airport's voluntary noise restrictions. Reno Air had asked the nine-member, Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority last week to approve the early morning flights in an effort to better compete against other airlines traveling to the Bay Area and Silicon Valley.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Michael J. Mishak and Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
As identities of some of the dead from the Reno air race began to emerge Sunday, the National Transportation Safety Board said the doomed plane had two types of recording devices that might provide clues to what went wrong. At least nine people — pilot Jimmy Leeward and eight spectators — were killed Friday when the World War II-era Galloping Ghost veered skyward during a qualifying heat, then plunged into the box seats. Unlike most aircraft of the same size and vintage, Leeward's plane had a forward-facing video camera and a system that tracked the aircraft's engine and positioning, along with other data, the NTSB said.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2011 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Reno The noise was "hellish," a "big crunch," followed by stunned silence and then screams. The smell was acrid, spilled aviation fuel and burnt oil. And the sight was enough to keep Gerald Lent awake for more than 24 hours: The massive plane falling from the sky directly toward him. The cloud of shattered tarmac and razor-sharp shrapnel. The body parts. The first responders. The dazed survivors at a storied air show that careened from festive to deadly in seconds.
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