Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReno Air Races
IN THE NEWS

Reno Air Races

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A year after a crash killed 11 and injured more than 70, the Reno Air Racing Assn. is planning to modify its race course to keep its fastest planes away from spectators, officials said Tuesday. Association director Mike Houghton said the group will ask federal regulators for permission to shift the largest course away from the crowd and to soften some of the curves. Houghton made his announcement as a panel appointed by the group released its list of safety recommendations. The association will hold its 49th annual National Championship Air Race beginning Sept.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 16, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
RENO - Anele Brooks is one of the many who came back. A year after a vintage World War II fighter plane crashed at the annual air races here, killing 10 spectators and the pilot and injuring about 70 others, the San Luis Obispo-area woman sat in a box seat on the airport tarmac, not far from where the carnage occurred. And even now, she refused to flinch at the sky. She first came to this race in 1978, on the arm of her then-boyfriend. His friends told him back then that any date who could appreciate the beauty of those magnificent men in their flying machines was marriage material.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
September 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A year after a vintage World War II  fighter fell out of the sky , killing 10  spectators and the pilot, the National Championship Air Races in Reno have resumed -- with a greater emphasis on safety. This year's version of the races -- the 49th annual edition -- kicked off this week. The event usually brings out some 200,000 spectators and is worth $80 million to the Reno area, according to the group's website. Vintage planes will be racing at speeds of 500 mph in what promoters call "The World's Fastest Motorsport.” It was on the afternoon of Sept.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A year after a vintage World War II  fighter fell out of the sky , killing 10  spectators and the pilot, the National Championship Air Races in Reno have resumed -- with a greater emphasis on safety. This year's version of the races -- the 49th annual edition -- kicked off this week. The event usually brings out some 200,000 spectators and is worth $80 million to the Reno area, according to the group's website. Vintage planes will be racing at speeds of 500 mph in what promoters call "The World's Fastest Motorsport.” It was on the afternoon of Sept.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Federal investigators issued seven recommendations Tuesday to improve the safety of the National Championship Air Races in Reno, where a highly modified World War II fighter plane plunged into spectators last year and killed 11 people, including the pilot. The National Transportation Safety Board called on the Reno Air Racing Assn. to review its 8.4-mile course to determine whether the risk to spectators could be reduced during races of powerful piston-engine aircraft in the so-called unlimited class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1985 | Associated Press
A woman whose parachute collapsed at 80 feet apparently escaped major injury Saturday at the 23rd annual Reno Air Races in another in a series of near-misses that have plagued the four-day event. Spokeswoman Marlene Olsen said Tanya Stringham was "awake, alert and coherent" in a local hospital after the incident. Stringham is a member of the Stardusters, an all-woman parachute team that was performing for the large crowd attending the world's largest air races.
SPORTS
September 19, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Lefty Gardner is 68 and still doing swooping loops and rolls in his P-38 Lightning, "White Lightnin'." Bob Hoover is 67. He may fly a jet or his yellow P-51 Mustang, "Ole Yeller," upside down right into the next century, waggling his wings for the crowd.
MAGAZINE
January 5, 2003 | Andy Meisler, Andy Meisler's last story for the magazine was a profile of sports agent-turned-educator Patrick McCabe.
Even for a layman, the concept is fairly easy to grasp: The lower a racing airplane flies, the better its pilot can see and the closer it can come to the spindly pylons that mark the inner edge of the racecourse. Which is probably why Ramblin' Rose, a 2,000-pound, 310-horsepower two-seater was flying at an altitude of about 60 feet at 2:45 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 13.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
MOJAVE -- The test flight appeared to be going well when the 12-foot rocket soared into blue sky. But upon its descent, something went wrong. On Tuesday, Masten Space System's Xaero test rocket exploded during a test flight here at Mojave Air and Space Port. There were no injuries, but the vehicle was lost. The 2-year-old vertical takeoff and landing vehicle launched around 10:30 a.m. on its most ambitious mission to date. It hit 3,280 feet and slowly came down for a landing under rocket power when it began wildly oscillating.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Airbus parent company European Aeronautic Defence & Space Co. and BAE Systems, two European giants in the aerospace and defense business, have acknowledged they are in merger talks in a deal that would create the industry's  largest company. The two companies had combined revenues of more than $94 billion last year, which surpasses Boeing Co.'s $68.7 billion in sales. In a joint statement , the companies said that a “potential combination would create a world-class international aerospace, defense and security group.” Under the possible deal, BAE Systems shareholders would control 40% of the combined group's stock and EADS shareholders would own 60%. Both companies already have a large U.S. presence.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Airbus parent company European Aeronautic Defence & Space Co. and BAE Systems, two European giants in the aerospace and defense business, have acknowledged they are in merger talks in a deal that would create the industry's  largest company. The two companies had combined revenues of more than $94 billion last year, which surpasses Boeing Co.'s $68.7 billion in sales. In a joint statement , the companies said that a “potential combination would create a world-class international aerospace, defense and security group.” Under the possible deal, BAE Systems shareholders would control 40% of the combined group's stock and EADS shareholders would own 60%. Both companies already have a large U.S. presence.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
MOJAVE -- The test flight appeared to be going well when the 12-foot rocket soared into blue sky. But upon its descent, something went wrong. On Tuesday, Masten Space System's Xaero test rocket exploded during a test flight here at Mojave Air and Space Port. There were no injuries, but the vehicle was lost. The 2-year-old vertical takeoff and landing vehicle launched around 10:30 a.m. on its most ambitious mission to date. It hit 3,280 feet and slowly came down for a landing under rocket power when it began wildly oscillating.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A year after an accident at the National Championship Air Races in Reno killed 11 people and injured dozens more, officials have implemented changes that they hope will improve the safety of an event in which airplanes can reach speeds of more than 500 mph and fly as low as 50 feet above the ground. The event has been under close scrutiny since a World War II-era P-51 Mustang flown by Jimmy Leeward, a 74-year-old Florida real estate developer, plunged into the crowd , killing himself and 10 spectators.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A year after a crash killed 11 and injured more than 70, the Reno Air Racing Assn. is planning to modify its race course to keep its fastest planes away from spectators, officials said Tuesday. Association director Mike Houghton said the group will ask federal regulators for permission to shift the largest course away from the crowd and to soften some of the curves. Houghton made his announcement as a panel appointed by the group released its list of safety recommendations. The association will hold its 49th annual National Championship Air Race beginning Sept.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Federal investigators issued seven recommendations Tuesday to improve the safety of the National Championship Air Races in Reno, where a highly modified World War II fighter plane plunged into spectators last year and killed 11 people, including the pilot. The National Transportation Safety Board called on the Reno Air Racing Assn. to review its 8.4-mile course to determine whether the risk to spectators could be reduced during races of powerful piston-engine aircraft in the so-called unlimited class.
OPINION
September 20, 2011
Symbol of courage Re "Valor in the 'kill zone,' " Sept. 16 How proud all Marines must be to see one of their own awarded the nation's highest military award, the Medal of Honor, in a ceremony at the White House — lest we forget our troops defending our freedom 24/7 in places far from home. As the father of an active-duty Marine, I am particularly awed by the actions of Dakota Meyer, and I thank God every day that there are still those among us who answer to a much higher calling.
SPORTS
May 31, 1997
Before Mike Kupper declares the IRL the winner over CART in the race to see who will control big-oval racing in America, he should ask how many race fans saw the Indy 500 and how many saw the Motorola 300 [May 24 in Madison, Ill.]. After 10 years of getting together with my friends and family to watch the Indy 500 on TV, this year none of us saw it--we were all at work. Of course, while Tony George can't be blamed for the weather, it's also premature to give him credit for vanquishing CART, while the real jury--us race fans--is still out. About 300,000 attended Indy on Monday, but only 100,000 came back on Tuesday.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2011 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Reno The noise was "hellish," a "big crunch," followed by stunned silence and then screams. The smell was acrid, spilled aviation fuel and burnt oil. And the sight was enough to keep Gerald Lent awake for more than 24 hours: The massive plane falling from the sky directly toward him. The cloud of shattered tarmac and razor-sharp shrapnel. The body parts. The first responders. The dazed survivors at a storied air show that careened from festive to deadly in seconds.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2011 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Reno The noise was "hellish," a "big crunch," followed by stunned silence and then screams. The smell was acrid, spilled aviation fuel and burnt oil. And the sight was enough to keep Gerald Lent awake for more than 24 hours: The massive plane falling from the sky directly toward him. The cloud of shattered tarmac and razor-sharp shrapnel. The body parts. The first responders. The dazed survivors at a storied air show that careened from festive to deadly in seconds.
MAGAZINE
January 5, 2003 | Andy Meisler, Andy Meisler's last story for the magazine was a profile of sports agent-turned-educator Patrick McCabe.
Even for a layman, the concept is fairly easy to grasp: The lower a racing airplane flies, the better its pilot can see and the closer it can come to the spindly pylons that mark the inner edge of the racecourse. Which is probably why Ramblin' Rose, a 2,000-pound, 310-horsepower two-seater was flying at an altitude of about 60 feet at 2:45 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 13.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|