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Reno Nv Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
March 18, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The neon promise still stretches across Virginia Street: "The Biggest Little City in the World." These days, though, that bright arc is anchored at the corner of a boarded-up casino called Harolds. Next to Harolds is a boarded-up casino called the Nevada Club. Nearby is a boarded-up hotel called the Virginian. The historic Mapes Hotel--at 12 stories, once the tallest building in the Silver State--has stood empty since 1982.
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NEWS
March 18, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The neon promise still stretches across Virginia Street: "The Biggest Little City in the World." These days, though, that bright arc is anchored at the corner of a boarded-up casino called Harolds. Next to Harolds is a boarded-up casino called the Nevada Club. Nearby is a boarded-up hotel called the Virginian. The historic Mapes Hotel--at 12 stories, once the tallest building in the Silver State--has stood empty since 1982.
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NEWS
January 22, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many ranchers in the West, Fred Mallery is familiar with the tales of secret deals, bloody fights and quick riches that make up the region's water lore. These days Mallery is especially interested in the saga of the distant Owens Valley. In a blitz of deceit and cash early this century, agents took control of the fertile valley's streams and pointed them 300 miles south to water a new desert metropolis--Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many ranchers in the West, Fred Mallery is familiar with the tales of secret deals, bloody fights and quick riches that make up the region's water lore. These days Mallery is especially interested in the saga of the distant Owens Valley. In a blitz of deceit and cash early this century, agents took control of the fertile valley's streams and pointed them 300 miles south to water a new desert metropolis--Los Angeles.
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