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February 15, 2010
'Renoir in the 20th Century' Where: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. When: Though May 9 Price: $20 Info: (323) 857-6000; www.lacma.org
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By David Ng
A small Pierre-Auguste Renoir painting that a woman said she purchased for just $7 at a flea market will return to a Maryland museum that argued that the painting was stolen from its premises in 1951. A federal judge in Virginia ruled on Friday that Renoir's "Paysage Bords de Seine," which was painted in 1879, is the rightful property of the Baltimore Museum of Art. The decision brought to an ostensible end a bizarre case that pitted a driving teacher against the museum in a battle over an Impressionist work estimated to be worth $22,000.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
As details emerged this week about a discovered cache of art that is believed to have been looted by the Nazis during World War II, officials in Germany have revealed that the trove includes works by Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso and Chagall. The cache also includes rarely seen 16th century pieces by German artist Albrecht Dürer and the 18th century Italian painter Canaletto. The Times reported Tuesday that the trove contains 1,406 pieces as revealed by German officials at a news conference in the city of Augsburg.  Early last year German authorities seized 121 framed and 1,285 unframed works from the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of the well-known Nazi-era art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2014 | By David Ng
A small Pierre-Auguste Renoir landscape painting has set off a dispute between a major American art museum and a woman who said she purchased the painting for just $7 at a flea market in 2009.  The Baltimore Museum of Art said the Renoir was stolen from its premises in 1951. A court hearing is scheduled for Friday to determine whether the museum or Virginia resident Martha Fuqua is the rightful owner of the painting. Renoir's 1879 painting "Paysage Bords de Seine" depicts a lush, verdant landscape on the banks of the Seine.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
American travelers, is J. Seward Johnson stalking you? Because he certainly seems to be stalking me. J. Seward Johnson , 82, is a sculptor. In fact, he might be the most ubiquitous American sculptor you've never heard of. If you've spent any time at all in big and medium-sized American cities in the last decade or two, you've probably bumped into his work -- usually human figures, life-sized and larger -- and you've probably smiled without noting his name. Since 2005, Johnson has been taking familiar two-dimensional images - often a famous photo or an Impressionist painting - and casting them as larger-than-life, three-dimensional sculptures, their contours smooth and boldly colored.  Jumbo kitsch, some people say. Remember the famous black-and-white photo of the sailor kissing the young woman in Times Square at the end of World War II?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010
Thanks for the spot-on review of Garry Marshall's pedestrian "Valentine's Day," which wasted an amazingly diverse cast's talents ["Sweet to Some, Saccharine to Others," by Betsy Sharkey, Feb. 12]. You could have put it more succinctly by saying: "An unsuccessful American remake of Richard Curtis' 'Love Actually,' but missing the acting, style, finesse and joie de vivre of the British original." Lee Moldaver Santa Barbara :: Who sneezed on Betsy Sharkey's See's Candies?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
If you haven't yet gorged on the gargantuan feast of Red Grooms' retrospective at the Temporary Contemporary, you can sample hors d'oeuvres in a small show of his drawings, graphics and multiples. If you're already stuffed, come for a light dessert. Either way, you'll be treated to tasty fare. Except for a couple of duplications, the gallery presents fresh examples of the retrospective's themes.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The latest artwork to join the permanent Phillips Collection in Washin g ton isn't an oil painting, a sketch or even a sculpture. It's a small room that will be coated with more than 800 pounds of beeswax and where one to two people at a time can squeeze in and behold its golden-tinged walls. The idea is to create "a meditative encounter that is expected to be immediate and intense," according to a museum statement. The installation is the brainchild of German artist Wolfgang Laib, who in the past has created temporary wax rooms at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at several European museums.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
To the Yasuda Fire & Marine Insurance Co., the auction of Vincent van Gogh's painting "Sunflowers" at Christie's in London was "a never-again" opportunity. That's why the company paid a record $39.85 million for it, a spokesman said here Thursday. Yasuda, Japan's second largest non-life insurance company, was not identified as the buyer March 30. But the company gave Christie's permission Wednesday to reveal its name in London after worldwide clamor developed over the mystery.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Just back from a nice long Memorial Day weekend, which, of course, put me in the mood for, you guessed it -- a vacation. Then I read this story: “U.S. is only 'advanced economy' that does not require paid vacation.” Figures. So I immediately clicked on the story . It has a nice chart. I like visuals. The chart made it easy to see just which of those socialist-loving European countries were giving their workers so many days off -- which is why, of course (pardon me while I channel the “tea party”)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
As details emerged this week about a discovered cache of art that is believed to have been looted by the Nazis during World War II, officials in Germany have revealed that the trove includes works by Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso and Chagall. The cache also includes rarely seen 16th century pieces by German artist Albrecht Dürer and the 18th century Italian painter Canaletto. The Times reported Tuesday that the trove contains 1,406 pieces as revealed by German officials at a news conference in the city of Augsburg.  Early last year German authorities seized 121 framed and 1,285 unframed works from the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of the well-known Nazi-era art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt.
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Unknown masterpieces by artists such as Marc Chagall and Henri Matisse, works thought lost to the ravages of war and others deemed "degenerate" or looted by the Nazis form part of the spectacular trove of art discovered by German authorities in the apartment of an elderly recluse in Munich. Two days after news of the find broke, officials in southern Germany revealed Tuesday that the hoard contains 1,406 pieces by masters whose names read like a who's who of Western art of the last 150 years: Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustave Courbet, Oskar Kokoschka, Emil Nolde.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Just back from a nice long Memorial Day weekend, which, of course, put me in the mood for, you guessed it -- a vacation. Then I read this story: “U.S. is only 'advanced economy' that does not require paid vacation.” Figures. So I immediately clicked on the story . It has a nice chart. I like visuals. The chart made it easy to see just which of those socialist-loving European countries were giving their workers so many days off -- which is why, of course (pardon me while I channel the “tea party”)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The world of cinema mourned when Jean Renoir died in Beverly Hills in 1979 at the age of 84. One of the most influential directors of the 20th century, noted for such masterpieces as 1937's "Grand Illusion," 1939's "Rules of the Game" and 1945's "The Southerner," the French filmmaker was widely embraced by the young Turks of France's New Wave, including Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard. But there was little notice seven months later when Renoir's first wife, Andree Heuschling, who acted in his silent films as Catherine Hessling, died in France at the age of 79. After their divorce in 1930, she soon retired from acting and drifted into obscurity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Renoir" is a lush, involving film that deals not with one Renoir but two, as well as the strong-minded woman who was a key player in both their lives. The year is 1915, the setting the gorgeous landscape of the French Riviera, and Renoir the father, the recently widowed 74-year-old Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste (the veteran Michel Bouquet), is hungry for inspiration. His son, future filmmaker Jean Renoir, is only 21, a wounded World War I veteran come home to the family compound at Cagnes-sur-Mer to convalesce.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The latest artwork to join the permanent Phillips Collection in Washin g ton isn't an oil painting, a sketch or even a sculpture. It's a small room that will be coated with more than 800 pounds of beeswax and where one to two people at a time can squeeze in and behold its golden-tinged walls. The idea is to create "a meditative encounter that is expected to be immediate and intense," according to a museum statement. The installation is the brainchild of German artist Wolfgang Laib, who in the past has created temporary wax rooms at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at several European museums.
OPINION
June 8, 1986
About 450,000 persons will have seen "The New Painting: Impressionism 1874-1886" by the time it closes next month at the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco. And that figure does not include the thousands who attended the premiere at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. The exhibition in San Francisco is a sellout--and so it should be, for it is a remarkable example of the way art can be combined to educate, entertain and inspire.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No doubt about it. These are uneasy days in the museum world. A Van Gogh sells for a record $82.5 million in New York, a Renoir for $78.1 million, and a judge in Ohio launches a search for obscenity in a collection of Robert Mapplethorpe photographs. In Piru, meanwhile, another cultural question rides the dry breeze: Who will take over the Harry H. Lechler Collection? "He's got family," a woman at the Piru General Store in Ventura County said.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
American travelers, is J. Seward Johnson stalking you? Because he certainly seems to be stalking me. J. Seward Johnson , 82, is a sculptor. In fact, he might be the most ubiquitous American sculptor you've never heard of. If you've spent any time at all in big and medium-sized American cities in the last decade or two, you've probably bumped into his work -- usually human figures, life-sized and larger -- and you've probably smiled without noting his name. Since 2005, Johnson has been taking familiar two-dimensional images - often a famous photo or an Impressionist painting - and casting them as larger-than-life, three-dimensional sculptures, their contours smooth and boldly colored.  Jumbo kitsch, some people say. Remember the famous black-and-white photo of the sailor kissing the young woman in Times Square at the end of World War II?
NATIONAL
September 9, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Talk about tag-sale treasure. About a year and a half ago, a Shenandoah Valley, Va., woman bought a $7 box lot at a flea market. The box included a small oil painting, a Paul Bunyan doll and a plastic cow.  The woman told the Huffington Post she wasn't really interested in the  5.5-by-9-inch  painting with a frame bearing the name RENOIR. No, she wanted the doll and the toy cow. (She has requested anonymity, but gave her name to the Huffington Post as “Renoir Girl.”)
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