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Rent Control

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
For the second time in three years, Californians will vote on a measure to curb powers of eminent domain -- but this time the proposal will include a provision to phase out rent control in the state. The Secretary of State on Wednesday qualified the initiative for the June ballot after certifying that the 1.1 million signatures submitted on petitions met state requirements. The California Property Owners and Farmland Protection Act would bar state and local agencies from using eminent domain to force the sale of private property, including homes, for use by private developers.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | Andrew Khouri
Arie Shashou remembers simple pleasures from the decades spent in his Westside home: helping neighbors with small tasks; the daily chats with the former manager of the complex; the paintings that line the walls of his one-bedroom. "It was a happy time," Shashou, 77, recalled on a recent Sunday afternoon. "I was hoping to die here. " That was before Shashou received an eviction notice in March. Shashou's $825-a-month rent-controlled apartment, and 17 other units, will be demolished to make way for a pricey new apartment complex.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1986
It has gone largely unreported in the press that, effective on Jan. 1, Los Angeles County's rent control law expired. This means that tenants in all the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County no longer have the protection of rent control. If landlords and tenants will practice the Golden Rule and treat each other as they would like to be treated, then there will be no rent gouging or punitive evictions and there will be no need for rent control laws now or in the future. KENNETH HAHN Supervisor Second District Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
When Wendy Greuel announced a landlord group's support of her Los Angeles mayoral campaign this week, she called it a sign of her growing appeal among business and labor. But landlord endorsements are not entirely a badge of honor in a city where about 60% of the housing is occupied by tenants. One of the city's biggest landlord groups, the Apartment Assn. of Greater Los Angeles, threw its support behind both Greuel, the city controller, and mayoral rival Jan Perry, a City Council member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Laws controlling how much mobile home park owners can charge for monthly site rentals don't infringe on constitutionally protected property rights, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the argument of Daniel and Susan Guggenheim of Goleta, Calif., that the city was engaged in an unconstitutional "taking" of their property by limiting how much space rentals can grow. The Guggenheims bought the land in 1997, five years before Goleta was incorporated as a city but well after Santa Barbara County adopted the original rent-control measure in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1985
Your editorial (May 23), "Rent Control Makes No Sense," in itself makes no sense. New apartment houses are not subject to rent control. So, your statement, "That rent control causes owners and builders to shy away from apartment house construction," is not valid. When an apartment under rent control becomes vacant, the owners can rent that apartment at whatever rate the tarrif will bear. It is no longer under the rent control umbrella. However, after one year that unit is subject to the allowable rental increase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989
The article on Santa Monica's rent control (Part I, April 29) was most timely since the Los Angeles City Council is at present considering a more stringent rent control ordinance. There is one characteristic of Santa Monica's experience that has counterparts in two other cities with rent control: a diminishing supply of rental housing. Economic theory teaches that by holding down by law the price of a product below the free-market price, the result is a lowering of the profitability of producing that product.
OPINION
November 3, 2012
Re "Supreme importance," Opinion, Oct. 30 Richard Epstein, a professor at NYU Law School and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, argues that Mitt Romney would probably appoint Supreme Court justices who would "understand enough about the economic situation to restore these questions [on court decisions regarding economic policies] to the constitutional agenda. " He contends that such a restoration would limit the number of "poorly conceived laws" that have, in his opinion, disrupted "the operation of competitive markets" and exacted a "heavy economic toll.
OPINION
October 30, 2012 | By Richard Epstein
The Supreme Court has not been much of an issue in this year's election. When it has come up, voters have typically focused their concerns on two issues, abortion and affirmative action. In my view, those issues receive too much attention. Both command broad political support that would dampen any Supreme Court efforts to stop them in their tracks. Still, we should all be concerned about how the court will be shaped by the next president, and how it will respond to the wide array of economic issues it must decide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Lower Nob Hill, a once stately neighborhood whose shifting fortunes have proved a draw over the years for prostitutes and petty crooks, is buzzing with new activity. The Academy of Art University has snatched up nine apartment buildings and former hotels in the enclave, converting them into dorms for students who pack the neighborhood's cafes and linger on the sidewalks to smoke and skateboard. Private landlords have gotten in on the action, renting to students who, city officials say, pay as much as 20% more for their lodgings than permanent residents do. But with the average rent for a San Francisco studio apartment hovering around $2,000, Lower Nob Hill and the institution that transformed it are Exhibit A in a pointed policy debate over student housing.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court rejected a constitutional challenge to New York City's famed rent-control ordinance, a post-World War II housing measure that limits the rents of more than a million apartments. The court's refusal Monday to hear the case is a setback for property rights activists, who had hoped a more conservative court would protect landlords and a free market in rentals. For decades, critics have said rent-control laws deny property owners the right to fully profit from their investments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Laws controlling how much mobile home park owners can charge for monthly site rentals don't infringe on constitutionally protected property rights, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the argument of Daniel and Susan Guggenheim of Goleta, Calif., that the city was engaged in an unconstitutional "taking" of their property by limiting how much space rentals can grow. The Guggenheims bought the land in 1997, five years before Goleta was incorporated as a city but well after Santa Barbara County adopted the original rent-control measure in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
A high-end sober-living home has filed suit against West Hollywood, alleging that the city's attempts to get its clients evicted from nine apartments discriminate against recovering drug and alcohol users. In a complaint filed late last month in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, KLEAN West Hollywood and its landlords said the city's actions violate the Americans With Disabilities Act, along with federal and state fair housing laws and provisions of the U.S. and state constitutions.
OPINION
May 28, 2010
Not so fast Re "Workplace raids go upstairs," May 25 I began reading about San Diego restaurant owner Michel Malecot thinking "Good — they're finally targeting the business owners who hire illegal workers." I finished the article with the opinion that the potential punishment is too punitive. Is it wise to turn a successful businessman into a penniless ward of the state, serving a prison sentence? No, a far better solution would be to cut through the red tape, obtain green cards for Malecot's employees and require him to double their pay and provide health insurance.
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