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Rent Control San Francisco

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NEWS
September 7, 1999 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A day in this city's unkind rental market can make winning the lottery look like a sure thing. Dozens of prospective tenants vie for each opening. The vacancy rate hovers at 1%. A two-bedroom apartment in a desirable neighborhood typically rents for more than $2,000 a month--and stays on the market for less than a day. Small wonder then that the latest wrinkle in rent control in San Francisco addresses the seemingly simple matter of renters bringing in roommates to replace those who moved out.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Lower Nob Hill, a once stately neighborhood whose shifting fortunes have proved a draw over the years for prostitutes and petty crooks, is buzzing with new activity. The Academy of Art University has snatched up nine apartment buildings and former hotels in the enclave, converting them into dorms for students who pack the neighborhood's cafes and linger on the sidewalks to smoke and skateboard. Private landlords have gotten in on the action, renting to students who, city officials say, pay as much as 20% more for their lodgings than permanent residents do. But with the average rent for a San Francisco studio apartment hovering around $2,000, Lower Nob Hill and the institution that transformed it are Exhibit A in a pointed policy debate over student housing.
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BUSINESS
October 29, 1991 | DANIEL ASKT
It's strange behavior for a fat cat. Five mornings a week, Jim Smith rises at midnight to work the graveyard shift as a mail handler. When he gets off at 9:30 a.m., he begins his building maintenance chores. Smith had hoped to quit the Postal Service long ago, but he made one big mistake. He plowed his hard-earned money into rental housing in Berkeley, where he and many other working-class landlords were stuck with 1970s rents and no way to recoup investments in their own property.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A day in this city's unkind rental market can make winning the lottery look like a sure thing. Dozens of prospective tenants vie for each opening. The vacancy rate hovers at 1%. A two-bedroom apartment in a desirable neighborhood typically rents for more than $2,000 a month--and stays on the market for less than a day. Small wonder then that the latest wrinkle in rent control in San Francisco addresses the seemingly simple matter of renters bringing in roommates to replace those who moved out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Lower Nob Hill, a once stately neighborhood whose shifting fortunes have proved a draw over the years for prostitutes and petty crooks, is buzzing with new activity. The Academy of Art University has snatched up nine apartment buildings and former hotels in the enclave, converting them into dorms for students who pack the neighborhood's cafes and linger on the sidewalks to smoke and skateboard. Private landlords have gotten in on the action, renting to students who, city officials say, pay as much as 20% more for their lodgings than permanent residents do. But with the average rent for a San Francisco studio apartment hovering around $2,000, Lower Nob Hill and the institution that transformed it are Exhibit A in a pointed policy debate over student housing.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1991 | DANIEL ASKT
It's strange behavior for a fat cat. Five mornings a week, Jim Smith rises at midnight to work the graveyard shift as a mail handler. When he gets off at 9:30 a.m., he begins his building maintenance chores. Smith had hoped to quit the Postal Service long ago, but he made one big mistake. He plowed his hard-earned money into rental housing in Berkeley, where he and many other working-class landlords were stuck with 1970s rents and no way to recoup investments in their own property.
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