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Rent Control Santa Monica

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989
The article on Santa Monica's rent control (Part I, April 29) was most timely since the Los Angeles City Council is at present considering a more stringent rent control ordinance. There is one characteristic of Santa Monica's experience that has counterparts in two other cities with rent control: a diminishing supply of rental housing. Economic theory teaches that by holding down by law the price of a product below the free-market price, the result is a lowering of the profitability of producing that product.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Monica's largest apartment complex was sold last week in a deal that illustrates how dramatically the end of rent control in that city has affected the market for apartment properties. Brentwood-based Douglas Emmett Realty Advisors paid $95 million for Santa Monica Shores, a two-building, 17-story complex that was built in the mid-1960s, according to Ron M. Pelleg, an independent broker who represented the seller, Santa Monica Shores Limited Partnership.
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NEWS
June 14, 1990 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica City Council this week took the first step toward a drastic revision of what is considered one of the nation's toughest rent control laws. The council voted 4 to 2 Tuesday night to direct the city attorney to draft a proposed City Charter amendment for the November municipal ballot that would allow rents on apartments voluntarily vacated to rise to new higher base levels.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, Santa Monica landlords came up empty at the polls in their quest for relief from the city's tough rent-control law, and they warned of a probable surge of evictions by property owners who decide to quit the rental business. Landlords also failed to break a consecutive winning streak by tenants rights advocates in the race for four seats on the city Rent Control Board.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, Santa Monica landlords came up empty at the polls in their quest for relief from the city's tough rent-control law, and they warned of a probable surge of evictions by property owners who decide to quit the rental business. Landlords also failed to break a consecutive winning streak by tenants rights advocates in the race for four seats on the city Rent Control Board.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Monica's largest apartment complex was sold last week in a deal that illustrates how dramatically the end of rent control in that city has affected the market for apartment properties. Brentwood-based Douglas Emmett Realty Advisors paid $95 million for Santa Monica Shores, a two-building, 17-story complex that was built in the mid-1960s, according to Ron M. Pelleg, an independent broker who represented the seller, Santa Monica Shores Limited Partnership.
NEWS
September 20, 1990
The Santa Monica Democratic Club will make its official endorsements for candidates and ballot measures in the November local and state elections Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the John Muir School auditorium, 721 Ocean Park Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2007 | Gale Holland
A federal appeals court Monday rejected a constitutional challenge to rent control in Santa Monica. A group of landlords had argued that eviction curbs adopted in 2002 were an "irrational response" to the city's housing difficulties and that the only legitimate policy would have been to limit rent ceilings to poor tenants. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 1990
A landlord-sponsored initiative seeking to make a big dent in Santa Monica's tough rent control law has qualified for the November ballot, according to the City Clerk. The initiative would allow Santa Monica landlords to increase rent to market levels when tenants voluntarily vacate. The City Council has a competing measure on the ballot that would also loosen the rules of rent control, but with more limitations than the landlords' initiative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988
Sponsors of an initiative that would expand rent control in Santa Monica were dealt a major blow Thursday when the city attorney ruled that petitions being circulated to qualify the measure for the November ballot are illegal. City Atty. Robert M. Myers also ruled that petitions being circulated for another measure, which seeks to limit campaign contributions, are similarly invalid.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica City Council this week took the first step toward a drastic revision of what is considered one of the nation's toughest rent control laws. The council voted 4 to 2 Tuesday night to direct the city attorney to draft a proposed City Charter amendment for the November municipal ballot that would allow rents on apartments voluntarily vacated to rise to new higher base levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989
The article on Santa Monica's rent control (Part I, April 29) was most timely since the Los Angeles City Council is at present considering a more stringent rent control ordinance. There is one characteristic of Santa Monica's experience that has counterparts in two other cities with rent control: a diminishing supply of rental housing. Economic theory teaches that by holding down by law the price of a product below the free-market price, the result is a lowering of the profitability of producing that product.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Shifting gears in its fight against rent control, a Santa Monica-based landlord group is calling on landlords in California, New York and elsewhere to join in a coordinated "day of protest" on Tuesday. Organizers say landlord groups in about a half-dozen cities will stage rallies on the front steps of their state capitols or city halls to demand an end to what they contend are excessive housing price controls that have "devastated" housing supplies and led to a housing shortage.
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