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BUSINESS
November 20, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood is rife with movie projects that languished for years before being made. The Oscar-winning hits "The Lord of the Rings" and "Chicago" each took more than a decade to get greenlighted. So did "Forrest Gump." But for pure drama, it's hard to beat the tortuous journey of "Rent," the musical adaptation that opens in theaters Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
December 29, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Big-budget sequels ruled the box office this year, but it was romantic comedies that topped rentals at red kiosks. The Adam Sandler-Jennifer Aniston comedy "Just Go With It" was the most rented movie at Redbox kiosks in 2011, according to new data released by the $1-per-night DVD company. Right behind was the Ashton Kutcher-Natalie Portman romantic comedy "No Strings Attached. " All of the top five movies were those intended to make audiences laugh, a list that also included the animated comedy "Rango," the romantic comedy "The Dilemma" and the buddy comedy "Due Date.
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BUSINESS
December 29, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Big-budget sequels ruled the box office this year, but it was romantic comedies that topped rentals at red kiosks. The Adam Sandler-Jennifer Aniston comedy "Just Go With It" was the most rented movie at Redbox kiosks in 2011, according to new data released by the $1-per-night DVD company. Right behind was the Ashton Kutcher-Natalie Portman romantic comedy "No Strings Attached. " All of the top five movies were those intended to make audiences laugh, a list that also included the animated comedy "Rango," the romantic comedy "The Dilemma" and the buddy comedy "Due Date.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Nearly two dozen Hollywood directors and producers have collectively criticized initiatives by the major studios to release movies in the home closer to when they open in theaters. In an open letter released Wednesday by the National Assn. of Theatre Owners, some of the entertainment industry's biggest filmmakers — including James Cameron, Peter Jackson and Gore Verbinski — lashed out at imminent plans by four studios to offer movies via video on demand, or VOD, just eight weeks after their theatrical release.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Bringing home a first baby can be an experience of mixed emotions. Underlying the wonder and affection new parents feel for their infant is a touch of terror. "It's fear of the unknown," actor Beau Bridges said. "I know. I've experienced it." Bridges, the father of three, narrates an outstanding videocassette, "Creative Parenting: The First 12 Months" (A&M, $29.95) that attempts to defuse this terror.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
What's this? The local premiere of Willy Russell's 1980 play--and the basis of a hit movie--"Educating Rita"? Somehow, Russell's comedy eluded the big boys of L.A. theater, but not the Long Beach Studio Theatre. You'd think the people in Long Beach would make noise about it. They don't. But there isn't much to shout about in Bill DeLuca's tepid production. The problems begin with the text.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
A deal between two little-known California technology companies is the first step, some experts say, in what could be the next big thing on the Web: search engines that let you find movies and TV episodes -- and then buy or rent them. The tie-up between Santa Monica-based Movielink and Blinkx, a start-up based here, is a key development in bringing together television and movies with the world of Internet search, some analysts said.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and David Sarno
The most popular site for watching video on the Internet may soon get Hollywood's most popular movies. Google Inc.'s YouTube is in talks with several major studios -- including Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. and Lionsgate -- about streaming movies when the DVDs become available in rental stores and kiosks, according to sources familiar with the situation. The move represents a bold gambit for the entertainment giants, which have been cautious in embracing the Internet out of fear it would disrupt relationships with major retailers and undercut lucrative DVD sales.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | MICHELE LINGRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent morning, Frank Pera jaunted on a beach of fine sand, past tall palms swaying in the tropical breeze, almost getting his feet wet in the aqua blue Caribbean waves. But that cruise liner in the background wasn't moving and Pera's feet were firmly planted on the cement floor of his Sun Valley studio directly in front of a scenic background.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1999 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ever since Video Hut opened for business 15 years ago in Los Feliz, the video rental store has been known for its wide, and eclectic, selection of movies. More than 28,000 videos are packed into the 6,000-square-foot store, ranging from the latest mainstream hits to classic, foreign, art-house and cult fare. But hidden behind a large green door at the back of the store is a smaller room filled with about 5,000 adult videos.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
DirecTV Inc. is in advanced talks to be Hollywood's first partner for early video on demand, a plan that is putting it in the cross hairs of the nation's top theater chains. People familiar with the matter said the satellite TV company would probably be the first distributor to launch so-called premium VOD, through which consumers would pay about $30 to rent a movie via the Internet or cable 60 days after it opens in theaters and at least a month before it becomes available on DVD. The plan represents a significant step in Hollywood's strategy to make movies available in the home earlier and in new ways to generate fresh revenue as DVD sales continue to fall and domestic box-office revenue has stayed stagnant.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Video-rental chain Blockbuster Inc. has been running ads criticizing its competitors for making consumers wait 28 days to rent new movies. In the case of Redbox, it turns out consumers may agree. Shares in Coinstar Inc., the parent company of $1-per-night DVD rental kiosk company Redbox Automated Retail, plummeted 27% on Friday after it disclosed that results for the fourth quarter ended Dec. 31 would be lower than expected. The reason: The company recently signed deals with several studios agreeing not to rent new movies until they had been on sale for four weeks.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and David Sarno
The most popular site for watching video on the Internet may soon get Hollywood's most popular movies. Google Inc.'s YouTube is in talks with several major studios -- including Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. and Lionsgate -- about streaming movies when the DVDs become available in rental stores and kiosks, according to sources familiar with the situation. The move represents a bold gambit for the entertainment giants, which have been cautious in embracing the Internet out of fear it would disrupt relationships with major retailers and undercut lucrative DVD sales.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood is rife with movie projects that languished for years before being made. The Oscar-winning hits "The Lord of the Rings" and "Chicago" each took more than a decade to get greenlighted. So did "Forrest Gump." But for pure drama, it's hard to beat the tortuous journey of "Rent," the musical adaptation that opens in theaters Wednesday.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
A deal between two little-known California technology companies is the first step, some experts say, in what could be the next big thing on the Web: search engines that let you find movies and TV episodes -- and then buy or rent them. The tie-up between Santa Monica-based Movielink and Blinkx, a start-up based here, is a key development in bringing together television and movies with the world of Internet search, some analysts said.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1999 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ever since Video Hut opened for business 15 years ago in Los Feliz, the video rental store has been known for its wide, and eclectic, selection of movies. More than 28,000 videos are packed into the 6,000-square-foot store, ranging from the latest mainstream hits to classic, foreign, art-house and cult fare. But hidden behind a large green door at the back of the store is a smaller room filled with about 5,000 adult videos.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1999 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Consumers used to buying the latest theatrical blockbusters as soon as they debut on video are in for a rude awakening. More big movies are being released first to video rental stores, with a retail price topping $100 that discourages those willing to pay the price to own them. It's a reversal of a five-year industry trend, in which any film that grossed more than $100 million in theaters was virtually assured of being sold directly to consumers at $20 or less.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Nearly two dozen Hollywood directors and producers have collectively criticized initiatives by the major studios to release movies in the home closer to when they open in theaters. In an open letter released Wednesday by the National Assn. of Theatre Owners, some of the entertainment industry's biggest filmmakers — including James Cameron, Peter Jackson and Gore Verbinski — lashed out at imminent plans by four studios to offer movies via video on demand, or VOD, just eight weeks after their theatrical release.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1999 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Consumers used to buying the latest theatrical blockbusters as soon as they debut on video are in for a rude awakening. More big movies are being released first to video rental stores, with a retail price topping $100 that discourages those willing to pay the price to own them. It's a reversal of a five-year industry trend, in which any film that grossed more than $100 million in theaters was virtually assured of being sold directly to consumers at $20 or less.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | MICHELE LINGRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent morning, Frank Pera jaunted on a beach of fine sand, past tall palms swaying in the tropical breeze, almost getting his feet wet in the aqua blue Caribbean waves. But that cruise liner in the background wasn't moving and Pera's feet were firmly planted on the cement floor of his Sun Valley studio directly in front of a scenic background.
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