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Rental Housing Southern California

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NEWS
July 23, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apartment rents throughout the Southland rose to record levels over the last year, crossing the average $1,000-a-month mark for the first time in Orange County, as the region's economy cranked out far more jobs than it did housing. Mirroring a sharp increase in home prices during the last year, rents rose an average of 6.9% across the region as occupancy rates climbed to an average of 97.4%, according to RealFacts, a Novato real estate research firm.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apartment rents in the Southland surged to record highs in the first quarter, with the typical two-bedroom unit leasing for nearly $1,400 a month in Los Angeles and Orange counties, according to a study released Friday. Throughout the five-county region, average rents for all apartments at larger complexes increased by 9% or more from a year ago, as the scarcity of new buildings, rising home prices and sustained job growth pushed up rents at more than double the rate of inflation.
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BUSINESS
June 30, 1993 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
Southland Starts Dip: While we're discussing bad news, analysts for U.S. Housing Markets, a research publication of Michigan-based Lomas Mortgage USA, report that while housing starts in much of the nation rose in the first quarter, they sank in California--most notably in four Southern California counties: San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Orange. A tally of single-family building permits issued in the first quarter shows San Diego County at the top of the losers list, down 21.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Low-income residents of Orange County are working more hours than ever to afford a decent apartment, a trend that is forcing tens of thousands to settle for overcrowded units and slum housing, according to a report released Thursday. Among other things, the study's findings pose a serious threat to the region's economy, which is enjoying its longest peacetime expansion since World War II.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1994
Southern Californians pay among the highest rents in the nation, judging by how much of their incomes go toward rent, according to figures released Monday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Here's a rundown of the nation's 10 largest metropolitan areas ranked by percent of median income required for rentals: Percent of Rank Metro area Monthly rent median income 1 Miami $493 31.3% 2 San Diego 611 29.8 3 Riverside 562 29.7 4 Los Angeles 626 29.5 5 Sacramento 531 29.3 6 Anaheim 790 29.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apartment rents in the Southland surged to record highs in the first quarter, with the typical two-bedroom unit leasing for nearly $1,400 a month in Los Angeles and Orange counties, according to a study released Friday. Throughout the five-county region, average rents for all apartments at larger complexes increased by 9% or more from a year ago, as the scarcity of new buildings, rising home prices and sustained job growth pushed up rents at more than double the rate of inflation.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a time of economic growth, more Americans than ever are too poor to find rental housing they can afford and, by most measures, the problem is most acute in Los Angeles County and northern Orange County. According to a study released Monday by the Washington, D.C.-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the nation's widest gap in affordable housing is in Southern California, where there are four times more low-income renters than there are low-cost units for them to rent.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Low-income residents of Orange County are working more hours than ever to afford a decent apartment, a trend that is forcing tens of thousands to settle for overcrowded units and slum housing, according to a report released Thursday. Among other things, the study's findings pose a serious threat to the region's economy, which is enjoying its longest peacetime expansion since World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Cassity's beach house is a modest place, really. OK, so it's a garage. But such a cozy garage! Tiled bathroom, kitchenette--and all for about $100 a month less than thecheapest apartment in town. "Of course, I knew it was illegal," the 40-year-old computer repairman chuckled, recalling the day he found his Hermosa Beach apartment. "I was born and raised on the beach. I know a bootleg (apartment) when I see one." No matter. Cassity took the place anyway.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
As the real estate industry ponders ways to cater to an aging population, one company has come up with an unusual amenity for senior housing: a professional theater. In fact, developers of an apartment complex catering to seniors with an artistic bent that has opened in North Hollywood think it may be the region's first pairing of housing and live theater. The $32-million NoHo Senior Arts Colony is intended for residents age 62 and over with interests in such artistic pursuits as singing, acting, photography and writing.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apartment rents throughout the Southland rose to record levels over the last year, crossing the average $1,000-a-month mark for the first time in Orange County, as the region's economy cranked out far more jobs than it did housing. Mirroring a sharp increase in home prices during the last year, rents rose an average of 6.9% across the region as occupancy rates climbed to an average of 97.4%, according to RealFacts, a Novato real estate research firm.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a time of economic growth, more Americans than ever are too poor to find rental housing they can afford and, by most measures, the problem is most acute in Los Angeles County and northern Orange County. According to a study released Monday by the Washington, D.C.-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the nation's widest gap in affordable housing is in Southern California, where there are four times more low-income renters than there are low-cost units for them to rent.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1994
Southern Californians pay among the highest rents in the nation, judging by how much of their incomes go toward rent, according to figures released Monday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Here's a rundown of the nation's 10 largest metropolitan areas ranked by percent of median income required for rentals: Percent of Rank Metro area Monthly rent median income 1 Miami $493 31.3% 2 San Diego 611 29.8 3 Riverside 562 29.7 4 Los Angeles 626 29.5 5 Sacramento 531 29.3 6 Anaheim 790 29.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1993 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
Southland Starts Dip: While we're discussing bad news, analysts for U.S. Housing Markets, a research publication of Michigan-based Lomas Mortgage USA, report that while housing starts in much of the nation rose in the first quarter, they sank in California--most notably in four Southern California counties: San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Orange. A tally of single-family building permits issued in the first quarter shows San Diego County at the top of the losers list, down 21.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Cassity's beach house is a modest place, really. OK, so it's a garage. But such a cozy garage! Tiled bathroom, kitchenette--and all for about $100 a month less than thecheapest apartment in town. "Of course, I knew it was illegal," the 40-year-old computer repairman chuckled, recalling the day he found his Hermosa Beach apartment. "I was born and raised on the beach. I know a bootleg (apartment) when I see one." No matter. Cassity took the place anyway.
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