Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRep Gabrielle Giffords
IN THE NEWS

Rep Gabrielle Giffords

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
January 8, 2011 | Kim Murphy and Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was shot in the head and critically injured Saturday morning during a meet-and-greet with constituents at a Tucson supermarket. As many as 18 other people, possibly including members of the congresswoman's staff, were shot and six were dead, the Pima County Sheriff's Department said. Giffords, 40, a Democrat recently sworn in to her third term in Congress, was undergoing surgery, according to Northwest Medical Center spokeswoman Darci Slaten. Nine other victims, including a child, were also at the hospital in critical or serious condition, she said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON -- Six rocks for the six people who died. Marlene Phillips set them down carefully outside a grocery store Wednesday, three years after a shooting rampage killed six people and injured 13 others including then-U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. It's a Jewish tradition to leave rocks on the grave of loved ones as a token of remembrance. “I'm Jewish. It seemed appropriate,” Phillips said.  She'd brought the rocks from her home, near the Catalina mountain range north of the city.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Five months after falling victim to an assassin's bullet, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was discharged from the Houston hospital where she has been rehabilitating. Calling her release a "major milestone," the hospital, TIRR Memorial Hermann, said Giffords would continue to receive outpatient care at a home outside of Houston owned by her husband, Mark E. Kelly. In a statement, her doctors said that the Arizona Democrat had improved to the point where she no longer needed to be a patient.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - He held her in an upright position against his chest to keep her from drowning in her own blood and applied pressure to her head wound. It was then that Daniel Hernandez Jr. remembered a television show he watched when he was 10 years old. It was about brain injuries and he knew he had to keep Rep. Gabrielle Giffords engaged. He kept asking her questions, such as whether she knew she'd been shot. She'd reply with a squeeze of the hand, move two fingers or give a thumbs up. His actions on Jan. 8, 2011, helped save Giffords' life and thrust Hernandez, then a 20-year-old intern for the Arizona Democrat, into the national limelight.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON -- Six rocks for the six people who died. Marlene Phillips set them down carefully outside a grocery store Wednesday, three years after a shooting rampage killed six people and injured 13 others including then-U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. It's a Jewish tradition to leave rocks on the grave of loved ones as a token of remembrance. “I'm Jewish. It seemed appropriate,” Phillips said.  She'd brought the rocks from her home, near the Catalina mountain range north of the city.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Anthony Prowell picked an awkward time and place to get involved in national politics. An elementary special-education teacher in Tucson, Prowell recently filed paperwork to run for Arizona's 8 th Congressional District, a seat occupied by Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Giffords has spent the year recovering from near-fatal gunshot wounds after a gunman opened fire at a Tucson grocery store, killing six people and wounding 13.  Prowell, who originally filed his candidacy papers as a Democrat, plans to campaign on a message that the current members of Congress aren't doing enough to bring the concerns of everyday people to Washington.  That message is sure to make his campaign a bit awkward, considering Giffords was shot while she was holding a “Congress on Your Corner” event with constituents in a local supermarket parking lot. Prowell, 48, said he has nothing against Giffords - “I've voted for her before” -  and that he would have challenged her even if she hadn't been shot.  “As a teacher, I always tell my students when they complain about something…you just can't complain and whine about things because it never solves it,” Prowell said.  “If I could get her or just the Republican to acknowledge that, hey, there are real people out there…I may get my butt kicked, but that's fine.  At least I can say I tried to do something.” Giffords' office declined to comment about Prowell.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Surgeons at Tucson's University Medical Center removed Rep. Gabrielle Giffords from a ventilator Saturday and inserted a tracheotomy tube into her neck to assist her breathing, according to the center. Removing her from the ventilator, which means she is now breathing on her own, allows the medical team to assess her ability to speak and is another step toward stabilizing her condition so she can leave the intensive care unit and be moved to a regular hospital room. The tracheotomy tube in her throat provides a passageway for free movement of air and, if she begins to have trouble breathing, allows a simple way for doctors to insert a tube into her lungs to assist her breathing.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' condition has been upgraded from serious to good and she could be transferred to a rehabilitation hospital Wednesday morning, Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center said. Giffords' doctors have determined she is ready to move to TIRR Memorial Hermann, where her rehabilitation will begin, Memorial Hermann said late Tuesday. The transfer was scheduled for sometime in the morning after doctors reviewed her condition again. Giffords, 40, was shot in the forehead Jan. 8 outside an Arizona supermarket in an attack that also killed six people and wounded 12 others.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, whose condition was upgraded from serious to good this week, has begun an intense regimen of full-time rehabilitation after a successful move between Houston medical facilities. Although she faces a long recovery, doctors said, she has progressed at "lightning speed" given the severity of her injuries. In Houston, she has been interacting with hospital staff and following commands. Giffords was shot in the head Jan. 8 during an event with constituents outside a Tucson supermarket.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords will return to Tucson for the first time since she was nearly killed there in an assassination attempt five months ago, her office said Friday. There will be no public appearances during what is described in a statement as a "brief private visit with her family" this Father's Day weekend. "We've been dreaming of this trip for some time," Mark Kelly, Giffords' astronaut husband, said in the statement, in which he also asked the public to respect her privacy.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2013 | By Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - "Speaking is difficult, but I need to say something important," former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords told her onetime colleagues. "Violence is a big problem. Too many children are dying. Too many children. We must do something. "It would be hard, but the time is now. You must act. " Her words, read from a single, handwritten page, were among the camera-ready scenes as the Senate began hearings on gun control Wednesday, in a charged atmosphere with each side reaching for emotional force.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Jared Lee Loughner is set to plead guilty Tuesday in the shooting attack that severely wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, according to knowledgeable sources, as mental health officials believe he is now competent to understand the charges against him in the assault, which killed six people and injured 13 at a gathering with the congresswoman's constituents in Tucson. At the hearing Tuesday morning in U.S. District Court in Tucson, psychiatric experts who have examined Loughner, 23, are scheduled to testify that they have concluded that despite wide swings in his mental capacity, at this time he comprehends what happened and acknowledges the gravity of the charges, according to two sources who spoke on condition of anonymity because the case was still unfolding.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Tucson shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner, who is being held in a prison mental hospital, may soon be competent to stand trial for the rampage of 13 months ago, a federal judge said Monday in ordering another four months of anti-psychotic medication and therapy for him. Loughner has made "measurable progress" under treatment at the Missouri hospital but "is not there yet" in terms of being able to assist in his own defense, said U.S. District Judge...
OPINION
January 29, 2012
Political contrasts Re "Gingrich gladly accepts critics' 'grandiose' label," and "Rep. Giffords says goodbye," Jan. 26 The juxtaposition of these two articles on the same page is poignantly ironic. In one, Newt Gingrich displays his presumed mantel of grandiosity by invoking Abraham Lincoln, the Wright brothers andJohn F. Kennedy, cleverly pandering to an audience about how characteristically "grandiose" it is to be an American. In the other, a young congresswoman who has survived a deranged killer's bullet acknowledges that she can no longer effectively serve during her recovery period and resigns.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2012 | By Ashley Powers and Lisa Mascaro, Los Angeles Times
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona, who came to symbolize hope and resilience as she tenaciously recovered from a gunshot wound to the head during the last year, announced she would resign from Congress to concentrate on her recovery. Giffords, 41, announced her plans in a stylized video on YouTube and Facebook and in a Twitter post. Her decision, effective this week, clears the way for candidates in both parties to stake a claim on her competitive border district. By state law, her replacement will be chosen in a special election.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2012 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
She was scared to touch the stranger writhing outside the Safeway grocery store, blood streaming from a bullet wound in his upper left thigh. But he looked at her with pleading eyes and forced out a "help me. " "If I don't do something," she thought, "he's going to die. " Anna Ballis inched away from the folding table she'd ducked under while a gunman was spraying bullets into a clutch of bystanders. The gunfire had halted and people were shouting, "Got him!" Ballis recognized one of the wounded people splayed around her: Gabrielle Giffords, the local Democratic congresswoman, who'd been chatting with admirers on this blue-skied January morning.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
There was no shuttle launch to see, but President Obama's trip to Cape Canaveral on Friday did include a meeting with Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), his first since he saw her in a Tucson hospital just after a January shooting that nearly took her life. A White House official said the meeting lasted about 10 minutes and took place before he met with the crew of Endeavour, which was to have launched Friday but was stopped because of technical problems. The shuttle crew includes commander Mark Kelly, Giffords' husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
A Safeway in Arizona What the Gabrielle Giffords Shooting Tells Us About the Grand Canyon State and Life in America Tom Zoellner Viking: 276 pp., $26.95 The best material in Tom Zoellner's "A Safeway in Arizona: What the Gabrielle Giffords Shooting Tells Us About the Grand Canyon State and Life in America" comes at the beginning: a moment-by-moment breakdown of the events of Jan. 8, 2011, when, during a Congress on Your Corner event...
NATIONAL
November 10, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Daniel Hernandez Jr. achieved a strange sort of celebrity when, a few days into his internship with Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' office, the congresswoman was shot outside a Tucson supermarket. Hernandez propped up a gravely wounded Giffords (D-Ariz.) and applied pressure to her bloodied head. His actions were credited with helping save her life. Since then, Hernandez has attended the State of the Union address, thrown the first pitch at Major League Baseball's All-Star game and recounted the events of Jan. 8 to groups around the country.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|