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Rep Henry Waxman

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BUSINESS
February 10, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Jerry Hirsch
Despite announcing two recalls to address sudden-acceleration problems, Toyota Motor Corp.'s conflicting statements are raising doubts about whether the company knows the exact cause of the defects, the chairman of the House committee investigating the automaker said Tuesday. Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) said that although Toyota was reassuring the public in the last two weeks that it had identified the cause, it was telling House investigators that getting to the bottom of the issue was very difficult.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Jean Merl and Richard Simon
Campaign contributions are flowing briskly to candidates in some of California's hottest congressional races, including two of the most vocal proponents of getting money out of politics. Incumbents in races in the Sacramento area, Central Valley, Bay Area and Riverside and Ventura counties each have raised more than $1 million to fend off vigorous challengers. And in San Diego County, freshman Democratic Rep. Scott Peters and his main opponent, Republican Carl DeMaio, were nearly neck and neck, with Peters taking in nearly $1.8 million to DeMaio's almost $1.5 million.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
House lawmakers Thursday charged that Toyota Motor Corp. still had not done the testing required to determine the cause of sudden unintended acceleration problems in its vehicles and had been more concerned about its image than addressing the issue. Toyota has said it was confident electronics were not causing vehicles to speed up suddenly — a point repeated in congressional testimony Thursday by its top U.S. sales executive. But Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Join Times staff writer Jean Merl at 12:30 p.m. for an L.A. Now Live discussion on the race to succeed longtime Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills). Waxman's district is one of the state's most politically active and wealthy areas, and no fewer than 21 people have filed to appear on the June 3 primary ballot. With no limit on how many terms a representative can serve, an open House seat is relatively rare and likely to draw a crowd - just not usually this big. PHOTOS: Henry Waxman through the years The hopefuls include 11 Democrats - not surprising in a district with a vivid blue wash - four Republicans, one Libertarian, one Green Party member and four independents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1994
In my letter of Feb. 3, two sentences were accidentally word-processed into confusion. The letter should have read: "In fact, Sen. Barbara Boxer, Rep. Henry Waxman, and 16 of their liberal California colleagues wrote to Gov. Pete Wilson demanding that he buckle under to EPA demands, even though that would result in 21,000 lost jobs. If the governor refused to go along with the EPA and its Democrat boosters, California would lose $1 billion in highway funding that is due the state. Either way, California would lose."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1991
As a voter in the 46th Assembly District and after being wooed so assiduously by my congressman, I now feel jilted since the June 4 special election. In his many years as a congressman, Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles) has built a major reputation in Washington. However voters rarely, if ever, hear from him in this "safe" district. Thus we were a little shocked when he began to carpet-bomb this district with his literature urging the election of Barbara Friedman, his choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1991
Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles) told The Times he has not received a single constituent complaint about the perks in which he and his colleagues have immersed themselves. Not being a constituent I don't suppose this letter will count for much. The very idea that Waxman's perception of his perks has reached the point that a taxpayer-subsidized $5 haircut is somehow seen as a necessity for being able to do his job indicates how self-centered congressional thinking has become. I suppose the taxpayer-subsidized haircut is essential to being able to make proper use of the taxpayer-subsidized television studio for incumbent members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1989
Rep. Henry Waxman's article "A Catastrophic Attempt to Do Better" (Op-Ed Page, Dec. 10) is probably the best statement to come out of Congress on this entire sorry subject. The only thing that it lacked was a recognition of the fact that the opposition to the 1988 Medicare Catastrophic Law was based on a feeling by the entire senior community that the improvements the act contained had such a high price tag that any further changes to include more needed coverage would be unthinkable.
OPINION
April 12, 1992
The Citizens for the Wilshire Metro Rail strongly supports returning the Metro Rail to Wilshire Boulevard. Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles) stated that "I think it is possible to tunnel safely and have no accidents, but it's also possible there will be a terrible tragedy. I just don't see any reason to take that chance." Waxman's analysis grossly overstates the risks and disregards the benefits of the Wilshire alignment. With respect to the methane risk, as stated in the accompanying article, the "technology for preventing natural gas explosions during tunneling is highly developed and relatively easy to implement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1990
In response to "Something Special in the Wind" (editorial, Oct. 31): We couldn't agree more with your statement that "the 1990 (Clean Air Act) amendments represent the end of a long federal holiday from environmental protection." Congress has taken a major step toward a healthier America by finally launching a tough clean air program. There are many people responsible for this victory, but no one deserves more credit than Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles). Without his talented, persistent efforts, public health and the environment would continue to suffer from the air pollution plague.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Jean Merl
As political frays go, the race to succeed longtime Rep. Henry Waxman is going to be a crowded, eclectic doozy. No fewer than 21 people - most of them lacking any public profile - have applied to appear on the June 3 primary ballot in that contest. The district the Beverly Hills Democrat is giving up after four decades in Congress is one of the state's most politically active, full of wealthy donors and home to many in L.A.'s signature entertainment industry. With no limit on how many terms a representative can serve, an open House seat is relatively rare and likely to draw a crowd - just not usually this big. The hopefuls include 11 Democrats - not surprising in a district with a vivid blue wash - four Republicans, one Libertarian, one Green Party member and four independents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Former Los Angeles Controller Wendy Greuel has picked up the endorsement of Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom as she battles in a growing field of candidates for an open Westside-South Bay congressional district. "I know Wendy will fight and deliver for the people of the 33rd Congressional District," Newsom said in a statement released Wednesday by the Greuel campaign. "She's spent 20 years in the trenches solving problems for everyday families," Newsom continued, citing Greuel's work in the administrations of President Clinton and former L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley as well as her stint as city controller.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
The race to succeed Rep. Henry A. Waxman is emblematic of a fresh wave sweeping across California's politics and, increasingly, the national landscape: intraparty fratricide as a means of upward political mobility. Four of California's Democrats in Congress lost to members of their own party in 2012, while Republicans did not knock out a single opposition lawmaker. Another Democratic incumbent faces a stiff intraparty challenge in a Silicon Valley district this year, and the clash for the Waxman seat seems destined to be expensive and bloody.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - "One of the giants of Congress. " "A tough partisan, but above all, an institutionalist. " "End of an era. " Those were among the reactions Thursday to the announcement by Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) that he would be retiring from Congress after 40 years. Tributes came from environmental and health groups, whose causes Waxman championed, and Democratic allies and Republican adversaries. "He was a tough partisan, but above all, an institutionalist who was in politics for all the right reasons," said former Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.)
NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Seema Mehta and Jean Merl
The sudden retirement of Rep. Henry A. Waxman set off a land rush Thursday of politicians and other prospects eyeing an exceedingly rare shot at an open congressional seat in one of the most affluent, strongly Democratic redoubts in the country. By the end of the day, amid all the pent-up ambition, there was one declared candidate - former Los Angeles Controller Wendy Greuel - and more than half a dozen others considering a bid to replace Waxman in what could be an expensive, crowded and highly competitive free-for-all.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Rep. Henry A. Waxman, whose legislative record has made him one of the country's most influential liberal lawmakers for four decades, announced Thursday that he will retire from his Westside seat, the latest in a wave of departures that is remaking the state's long-stable congressional delegation. During a congressional career that began when Gerald R. Ford was president, Waxman became one of the Democratic Party's most prolific and savvy legislators, focusing on issues related to healthcare and the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990
Bravo to Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles) for authoring legislation which would authorize approximately $4 billion over five years for AIDS treatments and assistance programs. It's about time that the federal government reacts to this epidemic with dollars for early intervention treatment of those infected with HIV, for assistance to those cities hit hardest by the disease, and for AIDS emergency relief grants. Until this year, Congress has been derelict in its duties to respond to the AIDS crisis with adequate funding levels which Waxman is proposing.
OPINION
July 26, 1987
Having served in elective office for 15 years, nine in Congress and six in the California Assembly, I well understand that in the heat of a potential political campaign that individuals who share common goals and concern for Los Angeles can seem at odds with each other. However, I must take exception to comments reported by The Times (July 15), about Mayor Tom Bradley attributed to Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky indicating that the mayor has not been effective in Washington, D.C. or "wasn't interested in talking" about Metro Rail with Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles)
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Rep. Henry Waxman's sudden announcement Thursday that he would retire after 20 terms set off wild guesswork among political power brokers in California about who would run to replace him. “Waxmania!” declared Democratic consultant Sean Clegg. “This is going to be a jail-break field. This is going to be a rumble on the Westside.” Among the names being bandied about are state legislators Fran Pavley, Richard Bloom and Ted Lieu, who said he was seriously considering a race and would make a formal statement Friday about his intentions; former state lawmaker Betsy Butler; Secretary of State Debra Bowen; county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, former City Controller Wendy Greuel and KCRW host Matt Miller.
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