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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989
Rep. Hyde is correct in his assessment of the situation in Nicaragua. The liberal Democrats in Congress should be hoping and praying that there will be no shenanigans by Ortega and his thugs at the election in Nicaragua in February, or the Democrats will pay the price for their folly at the polls next year. FREDERICK D. MULLEN Upland
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NATIONAL
April 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Republican U.S. Rep. Henry J. Hyde of Illinois, who presided over the 1998 impeachment of President Clinton, marked his 81st birthday by announcing that he would not run for reelection next year. In a statement on his website, Hyde, who took on Clinton as chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, offered no reason for "this difficult decision" not to seek a 17th two-year term.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989
Hyde's old-fashioned views concerning abortion are disturbing. In this modern age, seeing an elected official use words like: right, wrong, ethics, and morals, really makes me wonder. Don't he and his kind realize that when an unplanned pregnancy gets in the way, it should be terminated? Can't he have compassion for the couple who aborts several female babies because they only want a boy? Wouldn't he want to have a fetus removed from the womb limb by limb if he discovered it had Down's syndrome and wouldn't experience that quality of life only available to the intelligent, beautiful and rich?
NATIONAL
July 27, 2002 | WARREN VIETH and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Antiabortion Republicans in the House early today forced what could be a fatal delay of a bill to make it more difficult for consumers to cancel their debts by filing for bankruptcy. Meanwhile, the House moved toward passage of a bill that would allow President Bush to negotiate new trade agreements without being second-guessed by Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1998
Suppose they gave an impeachment and nobody came. Henry Hyde and Co. insist on carrying on their discredited vendetta against President Clinton even though they were repudiated by the U.S. public in the elections and even though it's clear that Clinton will not be removed from office. So is it any wonder that the public is totally uninterested in this psychodrama, which is more "psycho" than drama? And then they wonder why fewer and fewer people vote. Get a life, Rep. Hyde. JONATHAN AURTHUR Santa Monica The best Christmas present the Congress could give the American people is the impeachment of Bill Clinton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990
In response to "Let the Voters Determine Tenure," by Henry J. Hyde, Op-Ed Page, Feb. 6: Rep. Hyde (R-Ill.) states that incumbents can be defeated if better candidates run better campaigns to "ignite the voters." I have a great deal of respect for the Illinois congressman and it is unfortunate that he has fallen into the same "out of touch" syndrome as most of his colleagues. He is quick to cite that "only" 20% of House of Representatives members elected before 1974 are still serving, yet he fails to cite how many incumbents are routinely reelected in their districts, regardless of the opposition.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | From United Press International
Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.) was recuperating at Johns Hopkins Hospital after undergoing prostate surgery, his press secretary said Thursday. Hyde, 65, entered the hospital Monday and had the surgical procedure Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999
I'm one Republican who believes that Bill Clinton should never have been impeached. Nonetheless, I am outraged at the hatchet job done on Rep. Henry Hyde (R-Ill.) by Ben Joravsky because Hyde is leader of the House impeachment prosecutors (Opinion, Jan. 17). Joravsky calls Hyde a "down and dirty . . . street-fighting" political hack. And how does Joravsky back these charges? "All you need to know about Hyde is that he hails from DuPage County (Ill.)," he says. Nowhere in his article does Joravsky back his accusations with specifics.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Less than a week before senators return to Washington to take up the case against President Clinton, key players sent conflicting signals Wednesday on how they would conduct only the second presidential impeachment trial in the nation's history. The chief House manager in the case strongly urged the Senate to conduct a full-blown proceeding that allows a "fair presentation of the evidence" on whether Clinton should be removed from office for his conduct in the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | ANDREW BUCHANAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Ceh pictures clean streets and good roads when he thinks of Rep. Henry J. Hyde. Lisa Olenski thinks of a politically motivated hypocrite. The two views, offered Thursday from the tree-lined, middle-class communities of Hyde's suburban Chicago district, reveal a deep split in opinion over the Republican congressman's admission of an affair 30 years ago. It is Hyde, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, who would oversee any impeachment proceedings against President Clinton.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody knows exactly when the delivery will occur. But sometime after all the evidence has been compiled, witnesses deposed and documents drafted, the independent counsel's report on President Clinton's alleged affair with a former White House intern is likely to land in one of the most judicious laps on Capitol Hill. The politically charged case is enough to make some Republicans' mouths water, others to run for cover. But for House Judiciary Committee Chairman Henry J.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It had seemed a simple request, the sort of thing that lawmakers ask each other every day. But for a young Illinois legislator with a gift for passionate oratory, it was an introduction to the cause for which his name would become nationally known. Some would tout him as a hero, responsible for saving millions of lives; others would blame him for adding untold misery to the lives of those who already suffer the most in America. The legislator was Henry J. Hyde, and the year was 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990
In response to "Let the Voters Determine Tenure," by Henry J. Hyde, Op-Ed Page, Feb. 6: Rep. Hyde (R-Ill.) states that incumbents can be defeated if better candidates run better campaigns to "ignite the voters." I have a great deal of respect for the Illinois congressman and it is unfortunate that he has fallen into the same "out of touch" syndrome as most of his colleagues. He is quick to cite that "only" 20% of House of Representatives members elected before 1974 are still serving, yet he fails to cite how many incumbents are routinely reelected in their districts, regardless of the opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989
Re Aug. 11 Op-Ed articles on Nicaragua by Henry Hyde and William Goodfellow: I have sent Henry Hyde a copy of William Goodfellow's article, positioned right below his article. This letter is to express my heartfelt agreement with Mr. Goodfellow. We should be rejoicing that our government is finally recognizing the right of self-determination in Nicaragua and be grateful to the five Central American presidents for their peace plan. LEILA H. NEWMAN Pacific Palisades
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