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Rep Les Aspin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1988
Your article about the Pentagon paper chase ("Paper Rules Swell Cost of Defense," by Ralph Vartabedian, Part I, May 21) is doubly disturbing. How can this bureaucratic boondoggle first have come about and how has it been allowed to proliferate so? With this timely exposure, why doesn't one of the November hopefuls seize on yet another example of how government excess could be reduced with a resultant saving to taxpayers? "The consumer only has one military. There aren't competing armies," Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.
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NEWS
June 29, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The House Armed Services Committee Wednesday scrambled the Bush Administration's proposed $300-billion defense budget for next year, restoring programs slated for cancellation by the Pentagon and slicing $800 million from the B-2 stealth bomber production program. In doing so, it defied both its chairman, Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), and Defense Secretary Dick Cheney. After a long session marked by haggling among committee members, Aspin proposed undoing the day's work in what some lawmakers called a "King of the Hill" amendment.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
The chairman of the House Armed Services Committee said today that recent data on the B-2 stealth bomber indicates that the cost of the program may have risen to about $75 billion. Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) said the estimated cost may have risen by about $17 billion over the last two years, and he urged Defense Secretary Dick Cheney to declassify as much information as possible on the program to build radar-evading bombers. "A straightforward accounting of the B-2's cost, schedule, capabilities and management would contribute to the program's creditability and accountability," Aspin said in a two-page letter to Cheney.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The B-2 stealth bombers will cost more than $530 million each, according to cost figures declassified Friday by the Air Force, but Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, quickly predicted that the aircraft and its production costs "won't fly" in Congress. The service plans to build 132 of the radar-evading planes at a total cost of $70 billion, an increase from an earlier estimate of $67.7 billion. The Air Force has already spent $17.3 billion on the B-2 and has requested $39 billion for the program over the next five years, including about $8 billion a year in the early 1990s when production will be at its peak.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The B-2 stealth bombers will cost more than $530 million each, according to cost figures declassified Friday by the Air Force, but Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, quickly predicted that the aircraft and its production costs "won't fly" in Congress. The service plans to build 132 of the radar-evading planes at a total cost of $70 billion, an increase from an earlier estimate of $67.7 billion. The Air Force has already spent $17.3 billion on the B-2 and has requested $39 billion for the program over the next five years, including about $8 billion a year in the early 1990s when production will be at its peak.
OPINION
August 10, 1986
This letter is in response to Rep. Les Aspin's (D-Wis.) article (Editorial Pages, Aug. 5), "Pentagon's Constant War--for Turf." It seems to me that Aspin would do his constituents and the rest of this country well by concentrating on the congressional rivalries that "gum the works and must be curbed." I have just retired from the U.S. Air Force after serving both as an enlisted member and as an officer. I left after the minimum time allowed for retirement not because of the service bureaucracy (which certainly is alive, as it is in any profession)
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Air Force has proposed to spend $1.2 billion to repair and improve the troubled B-1B bomber over the next five years but has acknowledged that none of the $250-million planes may ever work as promised, congressional sources said Sunday. One key lawmaker has balked at the cost of the fixes, most of which would be paid for by funds already approved by Congress more than four years ago. Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, told members of the panel that the B-1B's inability to penetrate Soviet airspace as advertised at the outset of the program may force Congress to redefine the plane's mission.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Influential House liberals balked Wednesday at a compromise between President Bush and congressional Democratic leaders providing for early deployment of 10-warhead MX missiles on railroad cars and slower production of single-warhead, truck-borne Midgetman missiles. At a stormy meeting with Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, irate liberals insisted that the deal provides too much money for MX, which is favored by Republicans, and too little for the Democrats' preference, Midgetman.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The House Armed Services Committee Wednesday scrambled the Bush Administration's proposed $300-billion defense budget for next year, restoring programs slated for cancellation by the Pentagon and slicing $800 million from the B-2 stealth bomber production program. In doing so, it defied both its chairman, Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), and Defense Secretary Dick Cheney. After a long session marked by haggling among committee members, Aspin proposed undoing the day's work in what some lawmakers called a "King of the Hill" amendment.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Navy jets, while on training exercises over the Mediterranean on Wednesday, shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters when the Libyans appeared to threaten the U.S. warplanes, American officials said. The incident, which occurred about noon local time (2 a.m. PST) in international airspace, comes at a time of increasing U.S. hostility toward Libya over that nation's construction of what U.S. officials charge is a chemical weapons plant near the Libyan capital of Tripoli.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
The chairman of the House Armed Services Committee said today that recent data on the B-2 stealth bomber indicates that the cost of the program may have risen to about $75 billion. Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) said the estimated cost may have risen by about $17 billion over the last two years, and he urged Defense Secretary Dick Cheney to declassify as much information as possible on the program to build radar-evading bombers. "A straightforward accounting of the B-2's cost, schedule, capabilities and management would contribute to the program's creditability and accountability," Aspin said in a two-page letter to Cheney.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Air Force has proposed to spend $1.2 billion to repair and improve the troubled B-1B bomber over the next five years but has acknowledged that none of the $250-million planes may ever work as promised, congressional sources said Sunday. One key lawmaker has balked at the cost of the fixes, most of which would be paid for by funds already approved by Congress more than four years ago. Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, told members of the panel that the B-1B's inability to penetrate Soviet airspace as advertised at the outset of the program may force Congress to redefine the plane's mission.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Influential House liberals balked Wednesday at a compromise between President Bush and congressional Democratic leaders providing for early deployment of 10-warhead MX missiles on railroad cars and slower production of single-warhead, truck-borne Midgetman missiles. At a stormy meeting with Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, irate liberals insisted that the deal provides too much money for MX, which is favored by Republicans, and too little for the Democrats' preference, Midgetman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1988
Your article about the Pentagon paper chase ("Paper Rules Swell Cost of Defense," by Ralph Vartabedian, Part I, May 21) is doubly disturbing. How can this bureaucratic boondoggle first have come about and how has it been allowed to proliferate so? With this timely exposure, why doesn't one of the November hopefuls seize on yet another example of how government excess could be reduced with a resultant saving to taxpayers? "The consumer only has one military. There aren't competing armies," Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.
OPINION
August 10, 1986
This letter is in response to Rep. Les Aspin's (D-Wis.) article (Editorial Pages, Aug. 5), "Pentagon's Constant War--for Turf." It seems to me that Aspin would do his constituents and the rest of this country well by concentrating on the congressional rivalries that "gum the works and must be curbed." I have just retired from the U.S. Air Force after serving both as an enlisted member and as an officer. I left after the minimum time allowed for retirement not because of the service bureaucracy (which certainly is alive, as it is in any profession)
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preparing to leave office after a period of historic change in the American military, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney predicted Monday that his successor will become more conservative as he steps into his new role and cautioned him not to base "long-term national security policy on the assumption that all is well in Moscow." In a wide-ranging farewell interview 17 days before leaving office, Cheney said that his successor, Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.
NEWS
February 24, 1989 | From Reuters
President Hafez Assad discussed Middle East developments Thursday with visiting U.S. Rep. Les Aspin, diplomats said. They said his meeting with Aspin, a Wisconsin Democrat who chairs the House Armed Services Committee, was attended by U.S. Ambassador Edward P. Djerjian and also covered bilateral issues.
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