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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
Faced with more than 4,000 miles of broken sidewalks and scarce money to make repairs, Los Angeles officials are weighing a proposal to put responsibility for making the fixes squarely on homeowners. Under the proposal, homeowners would be forced to replace the damaged pavement -- or pay the city a fee -- when they sell their property, before the close of escrow. The City Council's Public Works Committee got its first look Wednesday at the "point of sale" plan, which could cost the average homeowner as much as $15 for each square foot of sidewalk, and dramatically shift the burden for such repairs from city government to the private sector.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Los Angeles lawmakers gave the green light Friday to spend $10 million to repair broken sidewalks next to parks, libraries and other city facilities. Despite public demands for stepped-up sidewalk repairs, the action previously had been delayed because council members were concerned about how the spending might figure in negotiations to settle a related lawsuit. But with the 2013-14 budget year drawing to a close in two months, and chances increasing that the funds might not be spent as promised, the council decided to move forward.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Joe Piasecki
A section of the 110 Freeway in Pasadena will be closed Sunday for roadway improvements. All northbound lanes on the Arroyo Seco Parkway between the Orange Grove Boulevard and Avenue 60 offramps will be closed from 1 a.m. to 9 a.m. Sunday, according to the California Department of Transportation. All southbound lanes on the same stretch of freeway will be closed between midnight and 8 a.m. Sunday. On Monday, northbound freeway commuters will face a full 110 closure between the 101 Freeway connector and the Avenue 20/San Fernando Road overpass from midnight to 8 a.m. Caltrans spokeswoman Judy Gish said the closures will allow workers to replace sections of the pavement on the freeway.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
Kent Bazemore underwent surgery on Wednesday to repair a torn peroneus longus tendon in his right foot. Bazemore was injured Apr. 6 in a 120-97 loss to the Clippers. The surgery was performed at Stanford University Medical School by Dr. Kenneth Hunt.  The 6-foot-5 guard/forward is expected to recover fully before next season. The Lakers acquired Bazemore in a February deal sending Steve Blake to the Golden State Warriors.  Through 23 games, starting 15, Bazemore averaged 13.1 points and 3.1 assists while playing 28.0 minutes a night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
After the roots of a 40-year-old tree ruptured the sidewalk outside her home, Nora MacLellan and a Playa del Rey neighbor assumed correctly there was little money at City Hall for repairs. So she threw down $1,000 — the neighbor a few thousand more — and decided to fix it themselves. More Los Angeles residents may have to do the same for the financially strapped city to have any hope of eliminating a sidewalk repair backlog that officials estimate at up to $1.6 billion. Like decades-old water lines and suspect bridges, they are an example of an aging publicinfrastructure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2013 | By James Rainey
The southbound connector between the 5 Freeway and the 2 Freeway will be closed from 3 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday to begin repairing damage caused by a tanker fire last weekend, Caltrans announced Friday. The state transportation agency has taken core samples of concrete damaged when the tanker erupted in flames in a tunnel. Caltrans will use the samples to determine the extent of the damage and what long-term repairs need to be made. The agency said it expected the damaged tunnel -- which connects the northbound 2 Freeway and the northbound 5 Freeway -- to be closed for several weeks or months to repair extensive damage to pavement, lighting, walls and support structures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By David Zahniser
Looking for new ways to fix buckled and broken sidewalks, Los Angeles City Councilman Bob Blumenfield called Tuesday for the reinstatement of a program that allows private property owners to pay a portion of the repair bill. Blumenfield , who represents part of the west San Fernando Valley, said he wants to make it possible for property owners to pay up to 75% of the cost of repairing their sidewalks. The effort would resemble a cost-sharing program that ended in 2009 amid a city financial crisis.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The Statue of Liberty, whose feet remained dry but whose home was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy, will reopen July 4 after extensive work to repair the infrastructure on her perch in New York Harbor is completed, officials announced Tuesday. "What a fitting day for Lady Liberty's return," Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said. From Washington, he joined Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and the National Park Service's northeast regional director, Dennis R. Reidenbach, in making the announcement during a conference call with reporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday is expected to take  preliminary steps toward approval of a $3-billion borrowing program to pay for the repair of 8,700 miles of badly damaged streets . Lawmakers are weighing a 1% increase in property taxes on Los Angeles homeowners for 29 years to pay for the program. The revenue would be used to resurface and rebuild the worst streets, part of a 60-year backlog of repairs. Council members Joe Buscaino and Mitchell Englander hope to include a proposal to issue city bonds for the work on the fall 2014 ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Los Angeles lawmakers Wednesday agreed to pursue further analysis of an ambitious $3-billion proposal to fix thousands of miles of the city's most deteriorated streets. The money could come from a mix of sources, officials say, including a property tax or borrowing against future sales or gas tax revenues. One option would be to ask property owners to increase taxes the equivalent of 1% of their property's value, paid over 29 years. On a home worth $600,000, that would mean paying about $200 more a year.
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
After several years during which they provided no money for sidewalk repairs, the City Council and then-Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa last year set aside $10 million to begin addressing the backlog of busted sidewalks in Los Angeles, especially those that have led to trip-and-fall claims. But today, the $10 million hasn't been touched. In January, the city's Bureau of Street Services proposed using one-third of the money to repair broken sidewalks associated with injury claims, one-third to fix those with heavy pedestrian traffic and the final third for a 50/50 program in which property owners would cover half the cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
When Mayor Eric Garcetti unveiled his first budget this week, he proudly announced that he was doubling funding to fix broken sidewalks from $10 million to $20 million. There's just one problem: None of the money that was budgeted for this year has been spent so far. And it remains unclear how much of it will be used before the budget year comes to an end June 30. Any unencumbered money will be swept back into Los Angeles' general fund. City officials said they held off on sidewalk spending because of a lawsuit filed by disabled residents who assert that broken sidewalks infringe on their rights to public access.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Craig Nakano
Oberon lost his thumb while in Los Angeles. With no warning, pop - it just fell off. Such are the dangers when you're a character in the Bristol Old Vic's latest production with the Handspring Puppet Company. The collaboration that turned skeletal steel and leather into "War Horse" is at it again, this time creating illusions for "A Midsummer Night's Dream" through Wednesday at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica with little more than wood and rubber bands. The rudimentary puppets in the show do get bashed and occasionally broken, said assistant stage manager Andy Guard, who performed emergency Oberon finger reattachment during the first week "Midsummer's Night" played in L.A. Some are essentially blocks of wood with no mechanical function, but others flutter and fly, as animated as the actors running onstage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
A concrete support for a Metro Gold Line bridge that spans the 101 Freeway in downtown Los Angeles has "visible cracks" and will be repaired, transportation officials told The Times on Monday. The damage is cosmetic and does not put Gold Line passengers at risk, said Bryan Pennington, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's executive director of engineering and construction. He added that drivers on the 101 Freeway and any nearby pedestrians do not need to worry about falling debris.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and Jim Puzzanghera
As General Motors Co. heads into congressional hearings examining its failure to fix a deadly safety defect, the automaker has moved swiftly to burnish its safety credentials by recalling millions of vehicles. GM said Monday that it will set aside $750 million in the first quarter to pay for repairs even as it recalled an additional 1.5 million vehicles. The car company has now called back about 5 million vehicles in the last two months to fix problems including faulty power steering systems, oil leaks and fractured axle shafts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By David Zahniser
One year after Los Angeles voters rejected a sales tax increase, the City Council is looking at trying again - this time by tying the money to the repair of the city's deteriorating network of streets. Two high-level City Hall policy advisors recommended Tuesday that lawmakers place a half-cent tax hike on the November ballot that would generate $4.5 billion over 15 years. The proceeds, they said, would pay to fix the most severely damaged roads and sidewalks. Passage of a tax could add momentum to Mayor Eric Garcetti's "back to basics" campaign, which focuses on upgrading basic services.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The earthquake-damaged National Cathedral in Washington will reopen to visitors and worshipers Nov. 12 after spending $25 million on initial repairs. Officials at the Episcopal church warn it may take "tens of millions" of dollars more and numerous years to restore and fix the building. An online statement from cathedral officials says the need to stabilize parts of the building, including some towers, was why it took so long to reopen. But this building is used to long construction periods -- it took 80 years to complete after the cornerstone was laid in 1907.  Where will the millions for ongoing repairs come from?
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Americans have spent nearly $6 billion on iPhone repairs since Apple first launched the phone in 2007, according to a new study. SquareTrade, which offers device warranties, recently conducted a study surveying more than 2,000 iPhone owners. The study looked at various factors, including "cost of repairs, replacements and insurance deductibles for cracked, dropped, pummeled, kicked, and water-damaged iPhones. " PHOTOS: iPhone frenzy means lines, high-fives around world From there, the company concluded that since June 2007 until last month, the total cost of repairs has added up to $5.9 billion.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
In its latest reaction to a mounting safety scandal, General Motors Co. recalled 1.5 million more vehicles and set aside $300 million to pay for repairs. The move follows the automaker's apologies over delays in fixing a deadly ignition switch problem. The new recalls - for unrelated issues, mostly involving air bags - stem from a top-to-bottom safety review ordered by GM's new chief executive, Mary Barra. GM released a video of Barra's frank comments to GM employees Monday, hammering home the gravity of the automaker's mistakes.
SPORTS
February 28, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
They build things big in Texas, but that doesn't mean they last. In Allen, Texas, home to a $60 million high school football stadium that opened in 2012, school district officials revealed that the stadium will be closed and need repairs because of "extensive cracking" in the concourse. Here's a story link from FoxSports Southwest. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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