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Repatriation

WORLD
February 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Ninety-six members of Australia's 226-member Parliament signed a letter to Congress appealing for help repatriating the lone Australian terrorism suspect being held by the U.S. at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, officials said. The letter, faxed to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco), asks Congress to ensure that David Hicks is not tried by a military commission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2006 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Joining an international effort to draw attention to China's policy of repatriating North Korean refugees, a coalition of Christian and human rights groups held a protest Saturday at the Chinese Consulate in Los Angeles, during which they mostly prayed and sang hymns. "Today, we lift up all our voices around the world ... united for one cause, joined with one heart, with one purpose ...
WORLD
March 31, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
People expelled by Britain from the Chagos islands during the Cold War to make way for a U.S. base set sail to visit their homeland. Britain last year agreed to allow 100 former inhabitants to make the 12-day visit to the Indian Ocean archipelago. Thousands of people, wearing T-shirts saying "Back to Paradise," thronged Mauritius' Port Louis harbor to see them off. Britain moved 2,000 Chagos residents to Mauritius and Seychelles in the 1960s and 1970s to pave the way for the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2006 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Korean American businessman Do-Woo Kim was 12 years old in 1948 when his family left behind everything it had and escaped from North Korea for freedom in the South. Today, the Los Angeles resident is a picture of economic success. "Our family has received so many blessings in America," he said. "We have four pastors and five PhDs and many businesspeople in the family."
NATIONAL
March 8, 2006 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
Up and down the hills of Woodlawn these days are signs that things are changing. White paper fliers flutter around storefronts, listing furniture for sale. On a Friday night, the bars on Katonah Avenue have a hollow feeling. The Irish are going home. Here in a vest-pocket neighborhood at the northern edge of the Bronx, they have lived for generations in an improbable Irish village. Spices are flown in for Irish bacon, which is cured in the basement beneath the butcher shop.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2006 | From the South Florida Sun-Sentinel
A federal judge ruled Tuesday that 15 Cubans who landed at the old Seven Mile Bridge in the Florida Keys in January should have been allowed to remain in the United States. In a strongly worded order, District Judge Federico Moreno called the Bush administration's decision to repatriate the Cubans unreasonable and demanded that the Department of Homeland Security make its best efforts to bring the Cubans back to the United States for immigration proceedings. Mercedes Hernandez, a U.S.
WORLD
February 19, 2006 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The father and daughter get lost a lot. He can't remember the sleepy streets of this tiny island nation in the Persian Gulf, not after so many years. As for her, she never knew them. They sit side by side in the darkness of their little Honda, the brake lights of passing cars washing their faces in red. Their eyes quiver over gates and signposts. They are looking for a landmark. "Isn't it back the other way?" Hussain Ali asks his daughter. "I think ...
NATIONAL
January 19, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Cuban activist, Ramon Saul Sanchez, ended an 11-day hunger strike in Miami after White House officials agreed to listen to concerns about the repatriation of Cubans, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported. Sanchez had been protesting the treatment of 15 Cubans who made it to an abandoned bridge in the Florida Keys but were denied entry into the U.S.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2006 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
Within sight of the Florida Keys, the Cubans' homemade boat had sprung a bad leak and was in danger of sinking. So its 15 passengers, who risked their lives crossing the Florida Straits, could make it no farther than an old and abandoned bridge. Had they reached the United States? The refugees, who clustered on the bridge's concrete pilings between Marathon and Little Duck Key early on the morning of Jan. 5, may have believed so.
WORLD
December 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
The first group of southern Sudanese refugees began their journey home Saturday after two decades of living in a camp in Kenya, U.N. food agency officials said. The voluntary repatriation of 147 refugees is the first such return by some of the hundreds of thousands of Sudanese who fled their country during its long-running civil war.
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