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OPINION
September 23, 2012
In a conventional war, enemy soldiers can be captured and held as prisoners of war until the end of combat. In the criminal justice system, an arrest for a violent crime will lead to a charge, followed by a guilty plea or jury trial. But some individuals imprisoned in the war on terror declared after the 9/11 attacks face the worst of both worlds: detention without trial but without the consolation that they will be freed and returned to their families in a tolerable period of time. Someone who lived in that twilight world for a decade was Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif, a Yemeni who was captured near the Afghanistan-Pakistan border in 2001 and held at Guantanamo Bay on suspicion of involvement with Al Qaeda or other enemy forces.
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OPINION
March 4, 2008
Re "Berkeley's inaction on bones criticized," Feb. 27 The leadership of UC Berkeley and the staff of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology are committed to seeing that ancestral remains and funerary objects held by the museum are properly repatriated to those Native American tribes that seek them. The return of remains is regulated by the federal Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, which requires museum scientists, official tribal representatives and tribes to follow procedures designed to ensure that remains are returned to tribes with documented connections to them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Nobody thought much about the locked metal cabinet in the medical school at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom. It was another forgotten fixture in the anatomy department - until a researcher last year found seven skulls with yellowing labels indicating the remains were those of Native Americans from California's Central Coast. Earlier this month, the skulls and several bone fragments were boxed and gingerly placed aboard a jet to LAX at London's Heathrow Airport.
NEWS
April 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations plan to repatriate Rwandan Hutu refugees, already delayed by logistics problems, disease and local opposition, was further postponed until at least May. Yagi Sitolo, governor of the eastern Upper Zaire province, said the repatriation should not start until May 5 because of a cholera epidemic. Sitolo intervened last week to delay a plan to start an airlift this weekend of up to 100,000 Rwandan Hutu refugees from two camps south of Kisangani in eastern Zaire.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | Reuters
The United Nations said Friday it had completed the voluntary repatriation of about 44,300 Ethiopian refugees from camps in northern Kenya.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Britain's enforced repatriation of Vietnamese boat people refused refugee status in Hong Kong will resume shortly despite U.S. opposition, government sources said today. British authorities hope that the move will deter another wave of boat people setting out for Hong Kong in February and March when sea conditions will permit a fresh exodus from Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1990 | SONNI EFRON
More than 2,214 Orange County residents have signed a petition protesting the forced repatriation of Vietnamese "boat people" by the Hong Kong government, Vietnamese-American community leaders said Monday. The petitions, which are addressed to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, were presented to a U.N. adviser at a March 6 meeting in Anaheim to discuss the Vietnamese refugee problem.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | Reuters
The U.N. World Food Program began rescue flights Saturday to repatriate 2,800 Ugandan refugees stranded by fighting in the town of Juba in southern Sudan. The refugees fled civil strife in Uganda five years ago for Juba, scene of fighting between Sudanese government forces and the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army.
OPINION
December 24, 1989
It is extremely regrettable that the government of Hong Kong decided to force the repatriation of Vietnamese refugees. It is more shameful of the free world to react lightly on this matter. But we cannot blame the people of Hong Kong for being heartless because they have done more than their share of sheltering the refugees. While countries around the world are trying to come up with a solution and accusing each other at the same time for not doing enough, they have overlooked the main causes of the "boat people" problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2011 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The J. Paul Getty Museum's iconic statue of Aphrodite was quietly escorted back to Sicily by Italian police last week, ending a decades-long dispute over an object whose craftsmanship, importance and controversial origins have been likened to the Parthenon marbles in the British Museum. The 7-foot tall, 1,300-pound statue of limestone and marble was painstakingly taken off display at the Getty Villa and disassembled in December. Last week, it was locked in shipping crates with an Italian diplomatic seal and loaded aboard an Alitalia flight to Rome, where it arrived on Thursday.
WORLD
June 5, 2010 | Edmund Sanders
One was a college student hauled off a public bus in the West Bank, blindfolded and deported to the Gaza Strip, two months shy of her graduation. Another was a beekeeper, left at the Gaza border after being seized in his West Bank home. He hasn't seen his wife and daughters, ages 8 months and 2 years, since December. The bees are dead and his business has collapsed. They are two of dozens of Palestinians ensnared by Israel's controversial practice of removing former Gaza residents from the lives and families they've led in the West Bank and sending them back to the restive Hamas-controlled seaside territory against their will.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
In an attempt to ensure the flow of remittances to devastated Haiti, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced Friday that the Obama administration would temporarily grant legal status to the tens of thousands of Haitian immigrants who were living in the United States illegally before this week's earthquake. But Napolitano emphasized that Haitians living in the island nation would not be eligible for temporary protected status, and would be repatriated if they attempted to enter the country, an implicit acknowledgment of the fear, thus far unrealized, that the earthquake could trigger a mass migration of Haitians to U.S. shores.
OPINION
August 21, 2009
The release by Scotland of Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, who was expected to spend his life in prison for the 1988 bombing of a Pan American jetliner, was merciful, certainly, but an outrage nonetheless. The "compassionate release" of the terminally ill Libyan terrorist showed no compassion for relatives of the 270 people killed when the jet exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland. Compounding their trauma was the muted protest of the Obama administration. Instead of viewing the special relationship between the United States and Britain as a cause for candor, the president, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Atty.
WORLD
March 2, 2009 | Barbara Demick
And the bronze goes to . . . no one. The identity of the bidder who promised to pay the estate of the late designer Yves Saint Laurent $40 million for bronze heads of a rabbit and a rat that had been looted from an imperial Chinese palace was revealed today: an advisor to a nonprofit group dedicated to repatriating missing relics. But the winning bidder, Cai Mingchao, said he had no intention of paying for the heads, which the Chinese government maintain should be returned as stolen property.
NEWS
January 11, 2009 | Curt Anderson, Anderson writes for the Associated Press.
As the only prisoner of war held on U.S. soil, inmate No. 38699-079 gets annual visits from the Red Cross and can wear his military uniform and insignia when he goes to court. Gen. Manuel A. Noriega frequently sees his wife and children, who make the trip to his private bungalow at a federal prison near Miami from their home in Panama. The onetime CIA operative is a dedicated news junkie, reads voraciously about history and politics and is working on a memoir. Whether the vanquished dictator's story ends in prison or freedom, at home or abroad, depends on how courts in three countries on two continents decide to punish him for his drug-running past.
WORLD
October 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Cuban Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque said Mexico has agreed to return Cuban migrants who arrive without documents, a move that may threaten the main exit route for those seeking to leave the island. Smugglers have increasingly stolen boats in Florida to carry migrants from Cuba to Mexico's Caribbean coast. Most evade Mexican officials, and the few who are caught are rarely deported. In most cases, they are given transit permits to the U.S. border. Mexican officials said they could not immediately comment on Perez Roque's statements.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
Cuban and Haitian refugees detained at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base do not have the same constitutional rights as U.S. citizens and may be returned home, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. A government spokesman said there are no immediate plans to repatriate any of the Cubans. A key issue in the appeals before a three-judge panel of the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals was whether the refugees have constitutional rights, such as access to lawyers.
WORLD
October 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Cuban Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque said Mexico has agreed to return Cuban migrants who arrive without documents, a move that may threaten the main exit route for those seeking to leave the island. Smugglers have increasingly stolen boats in Florida to carry migrants from Cuba to Mexico's Caribbean coast. Most evade Mexican officials, and the few who are caught are rarely deported. In most cases, they are given transit permits to the U.S. border. Mexican officials said they could not immediately comment on Perez Roque's statements.
OPINION
March 4, 2008
Re "Berkeley's inaction on bones criticized," Feb. 27 The leadership of UC Berkeley and the staff of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology are committed to seeing that ancestral remains and funerary objects held by the museum are properly repatriated to those Native American tribes that seek them. The return of remains is regulated by the federal Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, which requires museum scientists, official tribal representatives and tribes to follow procedures designed to ensure that remains are returned to tribes with documented connections to them.
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