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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2011 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Waste, fraud and abuse — also known as California's death penalty. It's a colossal waste of money for arguably the state's most inefficient program. California has spent an estimated $4 billion to administer capital punishment over the past 33 years and executed only 13 people. That's about $308 million per execution. It's a shameless fraud on the public. Californians have consistently supported the death penalty and been led to believe that it exists. It really doesn't.
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OPINION
April 6, 2014 | Doyle McManus
When Obamacare's first open-enrollment period ended last week, the tally was impressive: 7.1 million Americans signed up for insurance on federal and state exchanges by the March 31 deadline, several million more signed up for Medicaid and a whole lot of under-26 Americans got covered by their parents' plans. Those numbers represent a significant political victory for Democrats, making it highly unlikely that Republicans will be able to deliver on their promise to repeal the law. "You're not going to turn away 7 or 10 million people from insurance coverage," crowed Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.)
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NATIONAL
January 19, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
?In their campaign to repeal the healthcare overhaul President Obama signed last year, Republicans have leveled two sweeping critiques of the new law: its impact on the job market and on the federal budget deficit. Here is a run-down of how some of the rhetoric matches up with reality. Why do Republicans say the law will "kill" jobs? Many businesses will face new regulations, including rules dictating that their health plans eliminate lifetime limits, wave co-pays for preventive care and allow parents to keep children up to age 26 on their policies.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2013 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: I'm older than 80 and after two decades have finally just learned to maneuver my way through the Davis-Stirling Act, Civil Code sections 1350-1378. Now I'm told these codes I finally understand have all been changed. I am despondent over this. How and why did this happen, and where are these new codes supposed to be? Answer: When the California Legislature passed the Davis-Stirling Act in 1985, the law was hailed as an advancement in governing condominiums and other common-interest developments.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Christine Mai-Duc
President Obama endorsed a bill Tuesday that would repeal the Defense of Marriage Act, a 15-year-old law denying federal benefits for same-sex couples.  "The president has long called for a legislative repeal of the so-called Defense of Marriage Act, which continues to have a real impact on the lives of real people - our families, friends and neighbors,” said White House spokesman Shin Inouye. DOMA, passed by Congress in 1996 and signed into law by President Clinton, defines marriage as a legal union between one man and one woman.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- House Republican leaders set a vote in two weeks to repeal the nation's healthcare law -- a largely symbolic act that is not be expected to go anywhere in the Democratic-led Senate. House Minority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) said the vote will be July 11. "The House will once again vote to repeal ObamaCare," the leader said in a tweet. House Republicans already voted to get rid of the law in one of their first acts after taking the majority in 2011. They had promised another vote after the Supreme Court decision.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - For the 33rd time, House Republicans steered passage of legislation taking aim at the nation's new healthcare law - this time in a largely symbolic vote to repeal it. The two-day floor debate was orchestrated by GOP leaders to rev up voters before the November election, tapping into the deep divisions that remain over the plan two years after President Obama's signature domestic achievement became law. Americans continue to...
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
The New Hampshire House of Representatives has rejected a bill to repeal the state's 2-year-old law allowing same-sex marriage, dealing a blow to activists who had hoped to make the Legislature the first in the country to repeal a gay marriage law. Lawmakers in the House voted 211 to 116 against the bill, which would have repealed gay marriage and replaced it with a preexisting civil unions law, according to the Associated Press. It also would have made the issue a nonbinding question on the November ballot.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Alexa Vaughn, Washington Bureau
The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved a bill that would repeal the Defense of Marriage Act, the 15-year-old law that prohibits the federal government from recognizing legally married same-sex couples. The new legislation, written by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), is called the Respect for Marriage Act.   "There are 131,000 legally married, same-sex couples in this country who are denied more than 1,100 federal rights and protections because of this discriminatory law," Feinstein said.  "I don't know how long the battle for full equality will take, but we are on the cusp of change, and today's historic vote in the committee is an important step forward.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2012 | By Tina Susman
Connecticut has become the 17th state to repeal the death penalty, with lawmakers voting 86-62 on the measure after a marathon debate that stretched into the night and revived memories of some of the state's most heinous crimes. Gov. Dannel Malloy has said he will sign the bill, which passed the House on Wednesday night, six days after the Senate approved it . The bill replaces capital punishment with life in prison without the possibility of parole, but it only applies to future cases and has no effect on the 11 men on death row in Connecticut.
OPINION
December 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Here's something that California doesn't need: a replay of Proposition 8 in slightly different form. But it may get one. Opponents of a new state law that expands the rights of transgender students say they have submitted enough signatures to place a measure on the ballot to repeal it. Recent spot counts by the secretary of state show they may not have reached the threshold. In our view, California would be better off if the petitions were found to be lacking. As with Proposition 8, which altered the California constitution to ban same-sex marriages, this proposal is based on fear of and intolerance toward people whose sexuality falls outside of traditionally accepted norms.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Matt Ballinger
Prohibition ended 80 years ago Thursday. The top headlines on the Los Angeles Times' front page conveyed the news: " Dry Era End Proclaimed on Utah's Ratification: Roosevelt Calls on Nation to Ban Bootlegger and Saloon's Return; Huge Liquor Imports Authorized" "Rum Flows in Quietly: Repeal Hailed in Sane Style" My favorite tidbit from the main story involves when and how President Franklin Roosevelt signed a proclamation about the...
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By David Lauter, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - The latest polling on President Obama and his signature healthcare reform law provides a raft of bad news for the White House and Democrats, but a strong cautionary note for Republicans as well: The public disapproves of what Obama has done, but doesn't support the GOP's alternative. First the bad news for Obama: The latest Washington Post/ABC News poll shows the public by 55%-42% disapproves of his performance in office. By 63%-33%, Americans disapprove of his handling of the health law. Perhaps even more ominously for the president, by 52%-46%, the public now has an unfavorable view of Obama, himself.
OPINION
October 22, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Another week, another attack on the 2010 healthcare law. Days after opponents of Obamacare failed to derail it by shutting down the government, a federal court in Washington took up a lawsuit aimed at canceling the premium subsidies the law provides for many low- and moderate-income Americans. It's the first of two such challenges to reach the federal courts this month, and it illustrates - again - how some of the law's critics are trying to repeal it by inflicting the maximum possible damage on the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - It seems pretty simple: If a student has male genitalia, the kid uses the boys' bathroom. If there are female organs, then it's the girls' room. Right? But what if the student wears a skirt, makeup and lipstick, and has a penis? Which restroom then? California voters may be asked to answer that question next year in the November election. And it's not really so simple after all. What if a kid with a penis is standing at the boys' urinal wearing a dress and a pretty hair bow?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO--The National  Organization for Marriage, which backed Proposition 8's now defunct ban on same-sex marriage, announced Friday that it would work to repeal a new California law that permits  transgender students to use bathrooms that correspond to their gender identity, not their physical sex. Brian Brown, president of the anti-gay marriage group, called the transgender  law “a horrible attempt by activists to strip society of...
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Opposition to the Ohio law that limits the power of public employee unions has grown substantially in recent weeks, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday, offering a ray of hope to Democrats and their allies in organized labor as the presidential race heats up. According to the poll, 57% of those surveyed said they would repeal the measure, known as a Senate Bill 5, while 32% said they would keep it. The difference between the...
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - House Republicans united Wednesday around a plan to use the threat of a government shutdown as leverage to repeal President Obama's healthcare law, confident the American people are on their side. House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) yielded to his right flank by agreeing to attach the healthcare law repeal to a must-pass bill to keep the government funded past Sept. 30. A vote is expected Friday on a bill that would allow the government to stay open for the next few months.
OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Churches and other nonprofits long have been forbidden from endorsing political candidates. But erratic enforcement of the law has emboldened supporters of legislation in Congress that would end the restriction. Far from needing to be repealed, the ban on politics in the pulpit ought to be enforced more aggressively. A bill sponsored by Rep. Walter Jones (R-N.C.) would repeal a 1954 amendment to the tax code sponsored by then-Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson. The amendment says that churches and other so-called 501(c)
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