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Repetitive Strain Injuries

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BUSINESS
March 9, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the first legal tests of computer manufacturers' liability for so-called repetitive-strain injuries ended in a resounding industry victory Wednesday when a Minnesota jury cleared IBM Corp. of any responsibility for the injuries suffered by a former high school secretary who used a personal computer. Last year, a jury cleared Compaq Computer Corp. in a similar case, but hundreds of other RSI lawsuits are still awaiting trial.
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HEALTH
October 9, 2006 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
TENNIS elbow sufferers eager to retake the court, return to the computer or get back to hammering nails have long looked to cortisone injections to bring blissful relief. Australian researchers have found the relief part to be real, but short-lived. That blow to die-hard serve-and-volleyers comes from a study published in the Sept. 27 edition of the British Medical Journal that compared three groups of tennis elbow sufferers six weeks and a year after an office visit.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 2001 | Associated Press
Work-related repetitive strain injuries and similar muscular disorders decreased in 1999 but still accounted for more than a third of all job injuries, the Labor Department said. The new data were released a week after President Bush signed a repeal of Clinton administration ergonomics rules aimed at reducing such injuries. Congress passed the repeal after a stinging legislative fight waged by business interests and labor unions. About 1.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration held its first hearing Monday to debate the need for ergonomics rules in the workplace, but the gathering was marked by charges from labor leaders that it was a "sham" and disrupted by protesters who were escorted out by police. Labor leaders demanded that the government move to protect workers against repetitive-stress workplace injuries at the Department of Labor forum, which they charged had been stacked in favor of business interests.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
In a new try at drafting rules covering repetitive strain injuries, the Labor Department is proposing standards that are far less demanding on employers than those in a blueprint developed last year. The draft, released Monday, comes just days after the House voted to cut the Labor Department's budget in retaliation for its refusal to honor Republicans' calls for a moratorium on federal safety regulations.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1990 | RONALD E. ROEL, NEWSDAY
A team of government and university researchers has concluded that there is a "significant association" between typing at computer keyboards at Newsday and New York Newsday and the incidence of repetitive-strain injuries--widespread occupational illnesses resulting from repeated motions. The yearlong study of Newsday employees, conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the University of Michigan, found no one cause responsible for the injuries.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1992 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a report that bolsters mounting evidence about the hazards of working on computers, a federal agency has found that the majority of Los Angeles Times employees who complained of computer-related pain were suffering from "significant" musculoskeletal disorders. In a two-year study requested by The Times, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health surveyed nearly 1,000 Times workers who use computers. Forty-one percent of the workers reported that they had been injured.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two highly publicized events in Great Britain in the last few days--a union vote authorizing a strike at the prestigious Financial Times newspaper and a landmark court case involving phone company typists--have thrown the spotlight on the growing problem of repetitive strain injuries among the nation's white-collar workers. Like the United States, Britain has faced an ever-increasing number of RSI cases among workers whose jobs require long hours at video display terminals.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1994 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the scores of musicians suffering from performance injuries, Dorothy Taubman, 75, is nothing short of a miracle worker who has healed them from a life of pain and uncertainty. Last month, about 200 keyboardists--performers, professors, would-be teachers, doctors, scientists and just the curious, ranging from ages 13 to 71 and hailing from as far as Israel, Scotland and Japan--assembled at Amherst College for the 18th annual Taubman Institute.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joyce Howard, 25, is angry and hurting. Shooting pains run through her wrists, her arm muscles ache, and she's out of work. Her pain, she says, came from fileting 75 to 100 pounds of catfish an hour for four years at a processing plant here. It is fast, repetitive work--rippers, for example, are required to gut 32 fish a minute, and headsaw operators must behead one a second--all for $4.30 an hour. Her ailment continues despite surgery and therapy.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
Buffeted by criticism of inaction, Labor Secretary Elaine Chao said Thursday she will hold three hearings on work-related injuries, a first step toward pursuing a Bush administration policy to protect workers through employer cooperation. The hearings will be July 16 in Washington, July 20 in Chicago and July 24 in Los Angeles, with a goal of developing a universal definition of injuries caused by repetitive motion and stress.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, heeding complaints from two major corporations, agreed Monday to decide whether workers with repetitive stress injuries can qualify as disabled employees under the federal anti-discrimination law. At issue is the reach of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the 1990 law that requires employers to make "reasonable accommodations" for qualified workers who are limited by mental or physical impairments.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2001 | Associated Press
Work-related repetitive strain injuries and similar muscular disorders decreased in 1999 but still accounted for more than a third of all job injuries, the Labor Department said. The new data were released a week after President Bush signed a repeal of Clinton administration ergonomics rules aimed at reducing such injuries. Congress passed the repeal after a stinging legislative fight waged by business interests and labor unions. About 1.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1990, a Republican Labor secretary put ergonomics on the map by launching a drive for federal rules that would enlist employers in the quest to prevent what she called "one of the nation's most debilitating across-the-board worker safety and health illnesses": repetitive-motion injury.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican-sponsored legislation to wipe out the first federal job safety rules targeting repetitive-motion injuries won final congressional approval Wednesday from the House after a short and fiercely partisan debate. Ramming the measure through their chamber one day after it passed the Senate with equal speed, House Republican leaders whipped their ranks into line on an issue crucial to the party's allies in the business community.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They pack chicken pot pies and peel shrimp. They assemble cars, build furniture and paste labels on boxes. The workers most at risk for repetitive stress injuries are not computer operators but blue-collar packers and assemblers, folks at the lower end of the economic scale for whom a decade of economic prosperity has meant long hours and high production speeds. Some have learned to work through the pain. Others simply walk away from debilitating jobs.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | JAN HOFMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A hundred years ago, before there were such things as computers or checkout scanners or high-tech assembly lines, doctors identified a disorder called carpal tunnel syndrome. No one imagined at the time that what was then a rare condition would become a widespread problem by the 1990s. Nor could anyone have foreseen the controversy that would ensue when workers began claiming that their injuries were job-related.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | ROSA SALTER, THE ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
Some call the harp the instrument of the angels. It must be so, says Rita Linck, for it certainly wasn't designed for those made of flesh and blood. Consider that its 100-pound weight must be balanced precariously on one shoulder as it is played. Consider its steel strings, which bring constant calluses and biting blisters to the fingers of those who strive to pluck them to perfection.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2001 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Railroad Administration said Tuesday that it will launch an investigation into why the nation's second-largest railroad reported no cases of carpal tunnel syndrome among workers last year, only to later disclose that 125 employees had claimed that their jobs gave them the neuromuscular condition. The carpal tunnel cases came to light when Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2000 | Washington Post
The Clinton administration is expected to issue a final rule today requiring virtually all the nation's employers to create programs to protect workers from the repetitive stress strains and pain of the workplace. The sweeping new standard, eight years in the making, is the most costly ever to come out of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. It will cover 6 million workplaces and more than 100 million workers in nearly every line of business.
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