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Repetitive Strain Injury

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BUSINESS
March 9, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the first legal tests of computer manufacturers' liability for so-called repetitive-strain injuries ended in a resounding industry victory Wednesday when a Minnesota jury cleared IBM Corp. of any responsibility for the injuries suffered by a former high school secretary who used a personal computer. Last year, a jury cleared Compaq Computer Corp. in a similar case, but hundreds of other RSI lawsuits are still awaiting trial.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2005
Regarding "Using a BlackBerry Can Prove to Be a Major Pain in the Thumbs" (Oct. 22): I dispute Dr. Szabo's suggestion that a device such as this does not cause injuries. The design of the BlackBerry promotes use of the thumbs and fingers in awkward postures, particularly for users with larger hands. Combine repetitive typing with the awkward posture and you've got a significant amount of strain being placed on the thumb. This combination of risk factors can contribute to a repetitive strain injury.
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BUSINESS
October 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British Judge Rules Against Reporter in RSI Case: Claiming repetitive strain injury was a glibly used term with "no place in the medical books," the judge said the journalist's painful condition in his arms and shoulders was due to personal factors rather than work conditions. Financial reporter Rafiq Mughal, 44, had claimed damages and lost earnings from London-based international news and information agency Reuters, where he worked from 1987 to 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2001
Re "RSI Exists. Does Not. Does Too . . . ," Commentary, Aug. 15: Is repetitive strain injury/cumulative trauma injury an excuse used by lazy workers to exchange their financial security for a life of luxury on workers' comp--less than minimum wage? Studies indicate that RSI is far more likely to strike the conscientious worker than the "C student." If Labor Secretary Elaine Chao wants reality-based findings, she should commission a study on the time period between when a worker is diagnosed with RSI and when he or she becomes too disabled to work.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2005
Regarding "Using a BlackBerry Can Prove to Be a Major Pain in the Thumbs" (Oct. 22): I dispute Dr. Szabo's suggestion that a device such as this does not cause injuries. The design of the BlackBerry promotes use of the thumbs and fingers in awkward postures, particularly for users with larger hands. Combine repetitive typing with the awkward posture and you've got a significant amount of strain being placed on the thumb. This combination of risk factors can contribute to a repetitive strain injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2001
Re "RSI Exists. Does Not. Does Too . . . ," Commentary, Aug. 15: Is repetitive strain injury/cumulative trauma injury an excuse used by lazy workers to exchange their financial security for a life of luxury on workers' comp--less than minimum wage? Studies indicate that RSI is far more likely to strike the conscientious worker than the "C student." If Labor Secretary Elaine Chao wants reality-based findings, she should commission a study on the time period between when a worker is diagnosed with RSI and when he or she becomes too disabled to work.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2001 | Associated Press
Work-related repetitive strain injuries and similar muscular disorders decreased in 1999 but still accounted for more than a third of all job injuries, the Labor Department said. The new data were released a week after President Bush signed a repeal of Clinton administration ergonomics rules aimed at reducing such injuries. Congress passed the repeal after a stinging legislative fight waged by business interests and labor unions. About 1.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Apple Computer Inc. has settled its first court battle over injuries allegedly suffered by a computer keyboard user for an undisclosed amount. It did so because of a legal technicality and said it will continue to defend itself in other cases. The company blamed its outside law firm, which failed to turn over all court-ordered documents until last week. As a result, Apple faced a possible default judgment or mistrial plus related costs. It said the law firm, Saperston & Day of Buffalo, N.Y.
NEWS
February 14, 1996
If you tend to hunker down at the computer without taking any breathers, you might want to look into a $40 computer program by Bodysavers. The company's software puts prompts on the screen that gently remind you to take breaks and do some stretching to ward off repetitive strain injury. You can order by calling (800) 618-2732. Events Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders will hold a group meeting for families on Thursday at 7 p.m. Free. 4333 Marina City Drive, Marina del Rey.
HEALTH
February 16, 1998
Monthly injections of a drug can dramatically cool a man's libido and perhaps provide the first effective treatment for sexually deviant behavior, Israeli researchers report in the Feb. 12 New England Journal of Medicine. In tests on 30 men who have pedophilia and other abnormal compulsions such as exhibitionism and frottage, the act of rubbing against another person to achieve sexual arousal, Dr. Ariel Rosler of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem and Dr.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2001 | Associated Press
Work-related repetitive strain injuries and similar muscular disorders decreased in 1999 but still accounted for more than a third of all job injuries, the Labor Department said. The new data were released a week after President Bush signed a repeal of Clinton administration ergonomics rules aimed at reducing such injuries. Congress passed the repeal after a stinging legislative fight waged by business interests and labor unions. About 1.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the first legal tests of computer manufacturers' liability for so-called repetitive-strain injuries ended in a resounding industry victory Wednesday when a Minnesota jury cleared IBM Corp. of any responsibility for the injuries suffered by a former high school secretary who used a personal computer. Last year, a jury cleared Compaq Computer Corp. in a similar case, but hundreds of other RSI lawsuits are still awaiting trial.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British Judge Rules Against Reporter in RSI Case: Claiming repetitive strain injury was a glibly used term with "no place in the medical books," the judge said the journalist's painful condition in his arms and shoulders was due to personal factors rather than work conditions. Financial reporter Rafiq Mughal, 44, had claimed damages and lost earnings from London-based international news and information agency Reuters, where he worked from 1987 to 1989.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be the most important connection between the digital and the physical. Happy birthday to the mouse, the little critter that put the computer revolution into the palms of our hands, into our homes and into our collective consciousness. First introduced at a hobbyists conference in San Francisco on Dec. 9, 1968, the mouse was more of a curiosity than anything else.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | AARON CURTISS, aaron.curtiss@latimes.com
Those who can stand the tooth-aching sweetness of Nintendo's pink puffball Kirby are in for a treat with a new Game Boy Color title that has more in common with old-fashioned toys than modern video games. "Kirby Tilt 'n' Tumble" uses the same technology found in automobile air-bag circuitry to enable players to control on-screen action by tilting and shaking their Game Boys.
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