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Repetitive Stress Injuries

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NEWS
July 12, 1996 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a defeat for Republican leaders trying to reduce federal regulation of business, the House voted Thursday to allow the government to issue guidelines on repetitive stress injuries, the nation's fastest-growing workplace health problem. The House voted, 216 to 205, to drop a GOP-backed provision that would have prohibited the Occupational Safety and Health Administration from developing "ergonomic" standards to help protect workers against such injuries.
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HEALTH
August 7, 2006 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
The tendinitis in Mike Estrada's right arm was getting worse. He couldn't write up work orders for his construction company, carry a briefcase or even staple together papers. But although the pain was aggravated by the repetitive stresses of his job, the ergonomic changes -- getting a new office chair, using a track ball instead of a mouse -- didn't help. Finally, he sought help from doctors at USC. They prescribed not additional work changes, but painkillers and -- exercise.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
Buffeted by criticism of inaction, Labor Secretary Elaine Chao said Thursday she will hold three hearings on work-related injuries, a first step toward pursuing a Bush administration policy to protect workers through employer cooperation. The hearings will be July 16 in Washington, July 20 in Chicago and July 24 in Los Angeles, with a goal of developing a universal definition of injuries caused by repetitive motion and stress.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2005 | Julie Tamaki and James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writers
Tennis players risk tennis elbow. Computer geeks get mouse wrist. Steve Maviglio, a preternaturally connected Sacramento political consultant, developed BlackBerry thumb. A former press secretary for Gov. Gray Davis, Maviglio suffered a painful repetitive stress injury aggravated by compulsive use of the portable e-mail device that's become an unlikely icon of status and chic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996
That the reported incidence of repetitive stress injuries among American workers is rising at an alarming rate is beyond dispute. The U.S. Labor Department says the number of cases has increased 80% since 1990; hundreds of thousands of workers are now afflicted with severe and often crippling pain in their hands, wrists, shoulders and backs from performing the same task over and over. Some specialists dispute the Labor Department's figures, but all agree that the problem is growing.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of workers afflicted by cumulative trauma disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome continued to shoot up last year even as the overall rate of injuries and illnesses on the job declined, according to a federal report released Friday. In its annual survey of job-related injuries and illnesses, the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 332,100 workers suffered CTDs in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1996 | SHIRLEY KNIGHT, Shirley Knight is assistant state director of the National Federation of Independent Business
Would you buy an expensive medicine just because the guy down the street said it was sure to make you feel better? Probably not. But California is about to get a very expensive prescription, with about the same assurance of results. The "guy down the street" in this case is the standards board of Cal-OSHA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996
The April 9 editorial, "A Neglected Mountain of Pain," correctly identifies a growing epidemic of repetitive stress injuries among American workers that consumes one of every three workers' compensation dollars. However, The Times incorrectly blames the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for retreating from its effort to establish a workplace ergonomics standard to prevent such injuries. The truth is that since last summer the conservative Republican congressional majority has attached riders to appropriation bills prohibiting OSHA from developing, promulgating and issuing such a standard or even issuing voluntary guidelines.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1997 | Bloomberg News
The New York State Court of Appeals has handed a victory to repetitive-stress injury plaintiffs. The court threw out an appellate ruling that those suffering from injuries caused by extended typing on a keyboard have only three years after first using the keyboard to sue in New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | WILLIAM C. McMASTER, William C. McMaster is an orthopedic surgeon in Orange and president of the California Orthopaedic Assn
In the discussion about a reported increase in "repetitive stress injuries," some accuse the government of idly standing by while more and more American workers are injured on the job, by the job. A closer look tells a different story. Repetitive stress injuries at work can be a significant claim for individual workers. These injuries, however, represent less than 5% of the total number of workplace injuries and illnesses.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2001 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McClatchy Co. did not violate the Americans with Disabilities Act when it fired a Fresno Bee newspaper reporter with repetitive stress injuries, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. Because Jacalyn Thornton could still perform many "major life activities," two members of the three-judge panel on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's summary decision that she did not meet the ADA definition of disabled.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
Buffeted by criticism of inaction, Labor Secretary Elaine Chao said Thursday she will hold three hearings on work-related injuries, a first step toward pursuing a Bush administration policy to protect workers through employer cooperation. The hearings will be July 16 in Washington, July 20 in Chicago and July 24 in Los Angeles, with a goal of developing a universal definition of injuries caused by repetitive motion and stress.
NEWS
November 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
More than 100 million Americans with jobs ranging from the assembly line to the computer terminal would get new protections for work-related injuries caused by repetitive motion, under government standards to be issued Monday. The rules, more than a decade in the making, are stridently opposed by the business community and are so contentious they helped derail final budget negotiations between the White House and GOP lawmakers. Industry groups promise to challenge the standards in court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1999
The Labor Department this week proposed new regulations to protect an estimated 27 million U.S. workers from repetitive stress injuries. Yet these rules, which have been under discussion for years, face fierce and almost unanimous opposition from business groups and probable death in Congress. The demise of the proposed changes would be unfortunate because they make sense for employers as well as employees.
HEALTH
November 16, 1998 | CAROL KRUCOFF
As a sports medicine specialist, Dr. Rosemary Agostini often treats patients with "tennis elbow," an inflammation of tendons caused by repetitive overuse of that joint. But surprisingly, "most patients I see with tennis elbow don't even play tennis," the Seattle physician writes in a recent issue of the American College of Sports Medicine's Health and Fitness Journal. "More often than not, their malady is related less to sports than to their long hours at the computer.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1997 | Bloomberg News
The New York State Court of Appeals has handed a victory to repetitive-stress injury plaintiffs. The court threw out an appellate ruling that those suffering from injuries caused by extended typing on a keyboard have only three years after first using the keyboard to sue in New York.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
The Clinton administration will resume its drive to develop ergonomic standards aimed at preventing costly repetitive stress injuries in the workplace, Labor Secretary Robert Reich said Tuesday. The effort, which had been blocked by Congress, will resume with an open solicitation for information, he said. It is aimed at tackling the fastest-growing and costliest of workplace injuries, accounting for a third of the $60 billion in annual workers' compensations costs.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing a boost to proponents of new job safety rules, a federal agency issued a report Tuesday citing persuasive scientific evidence that many repetitive stress injuries are work-related. The report, from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, generally rebuts the arguments of business lobbyists opposing the Clinton administration's plans to draft workplace ergonomic regulations.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing a boost to proponents of new job safety rules, a federal agency issued a report Tuesday citing persuasive scientific evidence that many repetitive stress injuries are work-related. The report, from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, generally rebuts the arguments of business lobbyists opposing the Clinton administration's plans to draft workplace ergonomic regulations.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
The Clinton administration will resume its drive to develop ergonomic standards aimed at preventing costly repetitive stress injuries in the workplace, Labor Secretary Robert Reich said Tuesday. The effort, which had been blocked by Congress, will resume with an open solicitation for information, he said. It is aimed at tackling the fastest-growing and costliest of workplace injuries, accounting for a third of the $60 billion in annual workers' compensations costs.
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