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NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Kari Howard
One of the qualities I value most in the writers of the Great Reads are their powers of observation. I'm a big believer in showing, not telling -- in giving those little scenes and details that make readers connect to people whose lives might seem impossibly remote from theirs. The writer of Friday's powerful Great Read, Raja Abdulrahim, is particularly gifted: She finds those moments when she's directly in the line of fire in Syria. In Friday's story, Raja, who has made her way into rebel-held territory many times during the three-year conflict, wrote from Aleppo, where life alternates between terror and a grotesque version of normalcy.
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NATIONAL
April 11, 2014
By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli WASHINGTON - President Obama named White House budget director Sylvia Mathews Burwell to take over the Department of Health and Human Services on Friday, saying there was "no manager as experienced and as competent" to oversee the next phase of his signature healthcare law. "Sylvia was a rock, a steady hand on the wheel" as the administration dealt with the government shutdown last year, Obama told a...
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Luke O'Neil, guest blogger
After much speculation about who would take over for David Letterman on the "Late Show" after he retires next year, CBS announced Thursday that it will be Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert. That's a disappointing choice. What we need in a late-night host is "Stephen Colbert. " CBS CEO Les Moonves explained that Colbert would not host the show as his blustering character. "What you're going to get is the real Stephen Colbert," he said. "He said it's time to do something different. If he's going to be on our air for 20 years, as we all hope, it's not humanly possible to keep that character going.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
Following the news that he would be taking over "The Late Show" from David Letterman, Stephen Colbert took a moment on his show Thursday to pay tribute to his predecessor. He also addressed, albeit indirectly, his own promotion to one of the most coveted spots in late-night TV.  After an especially hearty opening round of applause, Colbert began, "There was some big news last week that slipped through my news crack. It concerns someone I've admired for years and yet surprisingly is not me. " It was, of course, Letterman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
The question of who will replace David Letterman on CBS' "Late Show" has been answered. The new host will be Stephen Colbert. Now the Internet's favorite guessing game has become: Who will replace Stephen Colbert? One of the most interesting aspects of the guessing game is the relatively low profile of the show. While it's unrealistic for anyone to have expected CBS to select anyone other than a huge star to fill their prime late-night spot, the half-hour following "The Daily Show" on basic cable's Comedy Central is a little more open to an offbeat choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
The guessing game over who would replace David Letterman on CBS' "Late Night" lasted exactly one week. On Thursday, the network confirmed that Stephen Colbert would be the new host to replace Letterman when he steps down in 2015. In a statement, Colbert said: "Simply being a guest on David Letterman's show has been a highlight of my career. I never dreamed that I would follow in his footsteps, though everyone in late night follows Dave's lead. " Robbed of the opportunity to continue to spin out who they thought should fill the spot, comedians, writers and fans fell over themselves to share their thoughts on the pick.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Steve Zeitchik
With the news that Stephen Colbert is replacing David Letterman as host of “The Late Show,” the inevitable question from moviedom is: What does this mean for us? Studios and personal publicists have long figured out how to handle Letterman, for all his oddities, and big movie stars regularly make appearances there, even if it doesn't always go smashingly. "The Colbert Report" has been a different story. Actors from big releases, that staple of late-night chat shows, don't often turn up on the Colbert series.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Stephen Colbert's "Colbert Report" has never been the most comfortable place for Hollywood stars to promote their movies, given the somewhat niche audience and Colbert's own purposefully bombastic, playfully antagonistic persona. But now that Colbert is stepping up to succeed David Letterman as the host of "The Late Show" in 2015 and dropping his conservative blowhard character, audiences could see a different side of him. Time will tell how Colbert gets along with Hollywood's A-list stars in his new role, and how much of his trademark quirk carries over, but it will certainly be an adjustment both for him and the studios that want their stars on the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Josh Elliott is leaving "Good Morning America" and being replaced in the news anchor chair by Amy Robach, ABC News President Ben Sherwood announced Sunday in a memo to his staff. "As many of you know, we have been negotiating with Josh these past several months," Sherwood wrote in the email. "In good faith, we worked hard to close a significant gap between our generous offer and his expectations. In the end, Josh felt he deserved a different deal and so he chose a new path. " Elliott is joining NBC Sports.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
As often happens when the financial demands on government social programs rise, there's been a lot of talk lately about the need to return to the traditional American system of community and faith-based help for the needy: charity, not government handouts. One hears this most often from fiscal conservatives such as House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), who spoke on the radio not long ago about how suburbanites shouldn't drive past blighted neighborhoods and say, "I'm paying my taxes, government's going to fix that.
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