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Replaytv Inc

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BUSINESS
May 1, 2001 | JON HEALEY
ReplayTV Inc., struggling in the nascent market for digital video recorders, has signed a deal with Motorola Inc. that could put its TV-recording software in millions of U.S. homes. Motorola, the leading manufacturer of cable converter boxes, is developing a version of its advanced digital converter that will have a built-in digital recorder. It has chosen Replay of Mountain View, Calif., as a primary supplier of the video-recording software in that box.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 2001 | JON HEALEY
ReplayTV Inc., struggling in the nascent market for digital video recorders, has signed a deal with Motorola Inc. that could put its TV-recording software in millions of U.S. homes. Motorola, the leading manufacturer of cable converter boxes, is developing a version of its advanced digital converter that will have a built-in digital recorder. It has chosen Replay of Mountain View, Calif., as a primary supplier of the video-recording software in that box.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after spurring a revolution in digital music, a leading maker of MP3 players announced a deal Thursday to buy ReplayTV Inc., a move the MP3 giant hopes will similarly stoke the fires of the digital video revolution. Sonicblue Inc., whose groundbreaking Rio digital audio devices have come to symbolize the changes sweeping the music industry, sees the same kind of opportunities in the digital video recorder made by ReplayTV.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after spurring a revolution in digital music, a leading maker of MP3 players announced a deal Thursday to buy ReplayTV Inc., a move the MP3 giant hopes will similarly stoke the fires of the digital video revolution. Sonicblue Inc., whose groundbreaking Rio digital audio devices have come to symbolize the changes sweeping the music industry, sees the same kind of opportunities in the digital video recorder made by ReplayTV.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ReplayTV Inc., a pioneering manufacturer of so-called personal TV recorders, changed chief executives Monday and laid off dozens of workers in a bid to cut its sizable losses. The Mountain View, Calif.-based company also announced that it will no longer build recorders and sell them directly to the public. Instead, officials said, they will sell their technology to cable operators, TV manufacturers and other companies eager to launch their own personal TV services.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2002 | Bloomberg News
TiVo Inc. filed a lawsuit accusing interactive-television rival Sonicblue Inc. of stealing technology that lets viewers store some programs while they watch another show. TiVo filed the federal patent-infringement lawsuit on Jan. 23 against Sonicblue and its ReplayTV Inc. unit. Sonicblue and TiVo are battling for supremacy in the growing market for video-data recorders. In December, Sonicblue accused TiVo of infringing a Sonicblue patent for devices that pause and replay TV shows.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2003 | Jon Healey
Insolvent Sonicblue Inc. of Santa Clara, Calif., said it was unable to close a deal to sell two of its units to D&M Holdings of Tokyo before the deadline imposed by a federal bankruptcy judge. As a result, the two units -- ReplayTV Inc., maker of a pioneering digital video recorder, and Diamond Multimedia Systems Inc., maker of the groundbreaking Rio portable digital music players -- are to be sold April 15 at a bankruptcy auction, the firms said.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
A coalition of television networks and studios persuaded a judge to dismiss a lawsuit by TV viewers who fear that the media companies might try to stop their use of ReplayTV Inc.'s digital video recorder. The media companies sued Sonicblue Inc. in 2001, claiming that the device that lets viewers share video over the Internet and skip TV commercials violated copyright law. Two years later, Sonicblue filed for bankruptcy protection and sold Santa Clara, Calif.-based ReplayTV to D&M Holdings Inc.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TiVo Inc. said Thursday that it won a patent for key technologies in the emerging field of personal video recorders, where TiVo is in fierce competition with Microsoft Corp. and others. The news sent TiVo's battered stock up more than 70%, or $3.56, to $8.50 in Nasdaq trading. Later in the day, the San Jose-based company reported a $50.2-million first-quarter loss, more than double the $23.4-million deficit of a year ago but down from an $89.2-million deficit in the fourth quarter of 2000.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
Some customers who took advantage of a significant price drop for a ReplayTV Inc. digital video recorder, thinking it included three years of the required service, are furious because their service has been disconnected and they may have to pay to reactivate it. "It's almost like buying a car and having the car later stop working, saying you can't drive it anymore unless you give us more money," said Eric Maur, 26, of Kaneohe, Hawaii.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ReplayTV Inc., a pioneering manufacturer of so-called personal TV recorders, changed chief executives Monday and laid off dozens of workers in a bid to cut its sizable losses. The Mountain View, Calif.-based company also announced that it will no longer build recorders and sell them directly to the public. Instead, officials said, they will sell their technology to cable operators, TV manufacturers and other companies eager to launch their own personal TV services.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Launching a preemptive strike in federal court, a high-powered group of television networks and Hollywood studios Wednesday sued the makers of an as-yet unreleased digital video recorder that can send copies of movies and TV shows over the Internet. The copyright-infringement lawsuit against ReplayTV Inc. and its owner, Sonicblue Inc., carries the battle over Internet "file-sharing" to a new front: consumer electronics companies.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking new markets for its dwindling data-storage business, Western Digital Corp. said Monday it created a subsidiary to provide digital recorders to cable television companies. The new product, a high-tech substitute for videocassette recorders, would allow cable companies to give customers the ability to record up to 30 hours of television programming. The Irvine company said it also has reached an agreement for its new subsidiary, Keen Personal Media Inc.
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