Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRepligen Corp
IN THE NEWS

Repligen Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Medco to Pay $51.5 Million in Stock for Repligen: Medco Research Inc. said the deal will give it several new products in early stages of human testing. The Research Triangle Park, N.C.-based company said it will issue new stock to be exchanged for Repligen Corp. shares, warrants and outstanding employee options. The deal is a boost to troubled Cambridge, Mass.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Medco to Pay $51.5 Million in Stock for Repligen: Medco Research Inc. said the deal will give it several new products in early stages of human testing. The Research Triangle Park, N.C.-based company said it will issue new stock to be exchanged for Repligen Corp. shares, warrants and outstanding employee options. The deal is a boost to troubled Cambridge, Mass.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2001
Parents whose autistic children received three doses of the highly touted drug secretin in a new clinical trial reported an improvement in symptoms, but that improvement could not be verified by a psychologist who rated the children, researchers for the drug's manufacturer reported in a press conference Wednesday. Although neither parents nor researchers knew which children received the drug, made by Repligen Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An antibody to a tiny segment of the AIDS virus's outer coating prevented a chimpanzee from developing the disease for at least a year, raising hopes for its use as a vaccine, scientists said last week. The antibody also protected a chimp from infection even when it was administered 10 minutes after exposing the animal to the AIDS virus, researchers reported in Nature. The treatment, developed by the Merck Co. of New Jersey and the Repligen Corp.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | From Associated Press
Doctors struggling to diagnose pancreatic illnesses will soon get a new aid. The government approved the first synthetic version of the hormone secretin on Friday. Secretin is a digestive enzyme best known as a controversial, unproved treatment for autism. But the substance, derived from pig intestines, long was used to help diagnose serious pancreatic dysfunction or a pancreatic tumor called a gastrinoma.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
An Eastern European crime ring netted at least $733,000 in illegal profit using trading accounts at seven brokerages, in the biggest fraud yet uncovered by a U.S. probe of online stock manipulation, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Wednesday. The ring was traced to 20 residents of Russia, Latvia, Lithuania and the British Virgin Islands, the SEC said in a lawsuit filed in Washington.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1991 | KEVIN E. CULLINANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stocks of leading U.S. condom makers and companies researching AIDS treatments skyrocketed Friday, reacting to professional basketball star Magic Johnson's announcement that he has the virus that causes AIDS. The surge reflected speculation that the Los Angeles Lakers guard will help change the public's perception of people with the AIDS virus and focus more attention on "safe sex" issues.
SCIENCE
August 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. James L. Sherley and Theresa Deisher, the plaintiffs in the civil lawsuit that threatens to end federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells, are perhaps better known for their extracurricular activities than for their scientific feats. Sherley, an African American, is a former MIT researcher who claimed racism when he was denied tenure, then garnered headlines when he went on a 12-day hunger strike in 2007 to protest the decision. Now employed by the Boston Biomedical Research Institute in Watertown, Mass.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
At a major AIDS research conference here last month, Franklin Volvovitz trailed around researchers and reporters trying in vain to interest them in a one-page press release about his tiny biopharmaceutical company, MicroGeneSys. "I tried to get us some attention, but I can't say I made much headway," said the 38-year-old founder, chairman and chief executive of the closely held company. Volvovitz made a lot of headway Tuesday, however, when the U.S.
HEALTH
January 12, 2004 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Parents of children with autism received disheartening news last week with the report that the hormone secretin, an alternative treatment for the disorder, did not significantly improve children's symptoms in a clinical trial. The study results, released Monday by the Massachusetts-based pharmaceutical company Repligen Corp., are the latest disappointments surrounding the controversial and expensive therapy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|