Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRepo Men
IN THE NEWS

Repo Men

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010
'Repo Men' MPAA rating: R for strong bloody violence, grisly images, language and some sexuality/nudity Running time: 1 hour, 51 minutes Playing: In wide release
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Art of the Steal MPI, $24.98 Don Argott's documentary tells a fascinating story about how the last wishes of art collector Albert Barnes have been circumvented by the stewards of his foundation, affecting the fate of one of the most important collections in America. Argott might have taken a more objective stance, given that the plans for this art — namely that it might end up in a space where more people will see it — is hardly as big a crime as the title implies.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Robert Abele
Plenty of interior body parts are forcibly removed from reluctant humans in the violent, futuristic action film "Repo Men." Kidneys, hearts, livers, all high-tech and artificial, are taken out and, in the movie's cautionary premise, rented to the medically needy at usury-friendly rates by a nasty corporation called the Union. But there's a key organ missing from the movie itself: a brain. In its place is a memory bank of other, better movies. That's a shame because creeping around the edges of "Repo Men" is the potential for a funky and prescient piece of gory dystopian satire.
OPINION
May 12, 2010 | Joe Queenan
Last month I went to see "Brooklyn's Finest" with my son and two friends. We arrived at the theater expecting to pay the customary $10.25 ticket price but were thrilled to discover that the venue was only charging $6 on Tuesday nights. The film, which deals with three morally defective cops in New York's most self-involved borough, wasn't especially good. But at the diner afterward, we all agreed that it was probably worth the $6 we had shelled out, particularly as that $4.25 price break was enough to cover coffee and pie for each of us. Pie a la mode, in fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña
The question is, "Do you think Jake is a psychopath?" "Hmm," comes the quiet voice on the other end of the line. "It depends on your definition of 'psychopath.' I guess the fact that he seems to carry no remorse or regret in the killing of others -- that, by many people's terms, would be considered psychopathic behavior. I think in this universe, he's dedicated to his job." Forest Whitaker is calling from New York to discuss "Repo Men," which pits lifelong friends Remy (Jude Law)
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
When Wall Street goes bust, they walk on Easy Street. When recession hits, their business booms. They are repossessors and auctioneers, scavengers of bad times who clean up the fiscal wreckage when the economy breaks down. "This is the boom time for us, definitely," said Evan Gabriel, an auctioneer in Canton, Mass. "It's a real big opportunity." And they have the 1980s to thank for their success. Then, companies and people borrowed freely from banks to buy and build. Then came the crash.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
A 20th anniversary screening of the legendary "Repo Man" -- featuring a new 35-millimeter print -- tonight kicks off the fifth edition of American Cinematheque's Festival of Fantasy, Horror and Science Fiction. In this fresh, virulently funny and gloriously grungy picture, writer-director Alex Cox sets his comic portrait of the way we are -- but might be happier forgetting -- against the scabrous background of the automobile repossession business in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Art of the Steal MPI, $24.98 Don Argott's documentary tells a fascinating story about how the last wishes of art collector Albert Barnes have been circumvented by the stewards of his foundation, affecting the fate of one of the most important collections in America. Argott might have taken a more objective stance, given that the plans for this art — namely that it might end up in a space where more people will see it — is hardly as big a crime as the title implies.
NEWS
April 16, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Repo men are the front-line soldiers of capitalism. In Mike Magnuson's fine first novel, Gunnar (Cheese) Lund and Dewy Bishop patrol the slums of Columbus, Ohio, for $265 a week, wearing the uniform of Winky, the happy-face symbol of a rent-to-own firm that offers TVs, couches and refrigerators to people who are too poor to buy them. They are also too poor to make their rental payments for long, but the company has allowed for that.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In gold chains and driving a white Jaguar, Jeff Friedman travels in style through a world of deception and fear. Under cover of night, he is out there on the streets--an unseen marauder looking for automobiles. He breaks in, jiggers the ignition, disables the alarms--whatever it takes--and scrams. On good weeks, he and his underlings get away with 50 to 75 cars--Porsches, Ferraris, you name it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
Jennifer Aniston and Jude Law were roughed up at the box office this weekend by a middle schooler. In a surprise victory that demonstrated the recent strength of well-known brands over well-known stars in movies, "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" opened to a studio-estimated $21.8 million in the U.S. and Canada, ahead of the $21 million for the romantic comedy "The Bounty Hunter," which stars Aniston and Gerard Butler. Law's science-fiction action film "Repo Men" bombed, premiering to just $6.2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010
'Repo Men' MPAA rating: R for strong bloody violence, grisly images, language and some sexuality/nudity Running time: 1 hour, 51 minutes Playing: In wide release
BUSINESS
March 19, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
"Alice in Wonderland" doesn't have to worry this weekend about getting taken down by a bounty hunter, repo man or wimpy kid. Walt Disney Studios' 3-D blockbuster "Alice" is sure to top the box-office charts for the third consecutive weekend, while four movies opening in wide release all jockey for position behind it. After its $116-million premiere in the U.S. and Canada, director Tim Burton's "Alice" declined a relatively modest 46% on its...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Robert Abele
Plenty of interior body parts are forcibly removed from reluctant humans in the violent, futuristic action film "Repo Men." Kidneys, hearts, livers, all high-tech and artificial, are taken out and, in the movie's cautionary premise, rented to the medically needy at usury-friendly rates by a nasty corporation called the Union. But there's a key organ missing from the movie itself: a brain. In its place is a memory bank of other, better movies. That's a shame because creeping around the edges of "Repo Men" is the potential for a funky and prescient piece of gory dystopian satire.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010
"The Bounty Hunter" A bounty hunter must find his bail-jumping ex-wife. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" The adventures of a boy trying to survive school. "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" A disgraced journalist and a computer hacker team up to find a missing teen heiress. "Greenberg" A down-on-his-luck ex-musician connects with his successful brother's assistant. "Repo Men" In a dark future, artificial organs bought on credit are repossessed when payments aren't made.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña
The question is, "Do you think Jake is a psychopath?" "Hmm," comes the quiet voice on the other end of the line. "It depends on your definition of 'psychopath.' I guess the fact that he seems to carry no remorse or regret in the killing of others -- that, by many people's terms, would be considered psychopathic behavior. I think in this universe, he's dedicated to his job." Forest Whitaker is calling from New York to discuss "Repo Men," which pits lifelong friends Remy (Jude Law)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crawling across the rooftop to hide from guards on the ground below, the 12 men paused in the darkness above Norwalk and listened for distant rumbling. They waited silently for noisy trucks to pass by on the nearby Golden State Freeway and muffle the sound of the ax they had brought to chop through the top of the warehouse next to Rosecrans Avenue. When the opening was punched through, the men tossed a 20-foot rope into the hole.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
"Alice in Wonderland" doesn't have to worry this weekend about getting taken down by a bounty hunter, repo man or wimpy kid. Walt Disney Studios' 3-D blockbuster "Alice" is sure to top the box-office charts for the third consecutive weekend, while four movies opening in wide release all jockey for position behind it. After its $116-million premiere in the U.S. and Canada, director Tim Burton's "Alice" declined a relatively modest 46% on its...
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
A 20th anniversary screening of the legendary "Repo Man" -- featuring a new 35-millimeter print -- tonight kicks off the fifth edition of American Cinematheque's Festival of Fantasy, Horror and Science Fiction. In this fresh, virulently funny and gloriously grungy picture, writer-director Alex Cox sets his comic portrait of the way we are -- but might be happier forgetting -- against the scabrous background of the automobile repossession business in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 16, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Repo men are the front-line soldiers of capitalism. In Mike Magnuson's fine first novel, Gunnar (Cheese) Lund and Dewy Bishop patrol the slums of Columbus, Ohio, for $265 a week, wearing the uniform of Winky, the happy-face symbol of a rent-to-own firm that offers TVs, couches and refrigerators to people who are too poor to buy them. They are also too poor to make their rental payments for long, but the company has allowed for that.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|