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Reporter S Notebook

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
They call it the "sandwich generation." That may sound like baloney and the makings of even more puns. But for those of us who have joined the ranks, it is no joke. The term refers to adults who are caring for not only their own children, but their aging parents as well. Squeezed in the middle, they are raising children while juggling the emotional, financial and logistical problems of playing parent to their own parents. Caring for the elderly is nothing new, but this "middle generation squeeze" is bound to become a growing issue, according to Sharon Hamill, a doctoral student at UC Irvine who is studying multigeneration families.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Dinah Lenney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Suzy Rosin developed an ugly cough in the fall of 2002, was diagnosed with lung cancer early the following year and died, after three surgeries and many rounds of treatment, in June 2005. In her memoir, "If You Knew Suzy," Katherine Rosman, the younger of Suzy's two daughters, writes that she was devastated, not just about losing her mother, but about "how she died: in emotional distress and with a complete unwillingness to reflect on her life." If prolonged illness offers the opportunity to reckon with what it all means — and to say goodbye — Rosman's mother wasn't interested.
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NATIONAL
January 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Joe the Plumber is putting down his wrenches and picking up a reporter's notebook. Samuel J. Wurzelbacher, who became a household name during the presidential campaign, is heading to Israel as a war correspondent for the conservative website Pajamas TV. He'll spend 10 days letting Israel's " 'Average Joes' share their story," he told WNWO-TV in Toledo, Ohio.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Joe the Plumber is putting down his wrenches and picking up a reporter's notebook. Samuel J. Wurzelbacher, who became a household name during the presidential campaign, is heading to Israel as a war correspondent for the conservative website Pajamas TV. He'll spend 10 days letting Israel's " 'Average Joes' share their story," he told WNWO-TV in Toledo, Ohio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
I sometimes fancy myself an intrepid urban explorer. Like the time in New York when I discovered I could forgo the subway and walk to work across the Brooklyn Bridge. That is, until the dank summer arrived. There were no showers at The Wall Street Journal. When I returned to California, I took up bicycling to work in Riverside. The newspaper there even installed special bike racks to encourage the practice. Again, no showers. But that wasn't too bad. The heat was dry. A bigger problem was health-threatening smog, which accumulates in Riverside with the regularity of raindrops in Seattle.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
For the youth of China, the past month's events in Tian An Men Square are certain to assume a mythic status exceeding even that of the famed Woodstock music festival for Americans who came of age in the 1960s. Music has been secondary to politics in what will be known as the great 1989 democracy rallies of Tian An Men Square. But two songs have played important roles in protests that appear on the verge of toppling Premier Li Peng from office: China's national anthem and the revolutionary socialist hymn, "The Internationale."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The public flocked to a Newport Beach courthouse last week to watch F. Lee Bailey in action, defending Pomona surgeon Thomas A. Gionis against charges that he masterminded an attack on his ex-wife, Aissa Wayne, and her boyfriend. The Massachusetts lawyer drew appreciative laughs and gasps of awe from the standing-room-only gallery as he used his legendary courtroom wit to argue that his client was not involved in the attack on John Wayne's daughter and then-boyfriend Roger W. Luby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1991
After reading Tammerlin Drummond's column ("Reporter's Notebook: Tragic Case Left Its Scar on Everybody," March 24) about the Amber Jefferson case, I have a question. The story makes it clear that, following the incident, many people, including "Hollywood celebrities and civil rights activists" vilified the Orange County Sheriff's Department regarding the initial investigation. These people accused the Sheriff's Department of covering up the incident and that the investigation was "just another example of the racism prevalent in Orange County."
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | VICTOR F. ZONANA and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bart Simpson was drafted into the war against AIDS here at the Sixth International Conference on AIDS Saturday. At a conference devoid of major breakthroughs promising immediate relief from the ever-rising death toll, one of the biggest sensations was a new and apparently unauthorized T-shirt featuring an image of the cartoon brat. "AIDS is a global crisis, dude," reads the caption coming out of Bart's mouth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
It's a warm, beautiful, sunny afternoon on the waterfront in warm, beautiful, sunny Laguna Beach. And why would some people go down to Laguna Beach on such a warm, beautiful, sunny afternoon? To swim? Surf? Tan? Ogle? Kick sand at weaklings? Of course not. They want to protest people who buy and sell furs!!!! Now, there aren't a lot of people who go to the beach these days with furs on, let alone much of anything else. In fact, most of the people on the strand seem to be absorbed in such socially innocuous activities as frolicking, picnicking and just plain enjoying themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1991
After reading Tammerlin Drummond's column ("Reporter's Notebook: Tragic Case Left Its Scar on Everybody," March 24) about the Amber Jefferson case, I have a question. The story makes it clear that, following the incident, many people, including "Hollywood celebrities and civil rights activists" vilified the Orange County Sheriff's Department regarding the initial investigation. These people accused the Sheriff's Department of covering up the incident and that the investigation was "just another example of the racism prevalent in Orange County."
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | VICTOR F. ZONANA and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bart Simpson was drafted into the war against AIDS here at the Sixth International Conference on AIDS Saturday. At a conference devoid of major breakthroughs promising immediate relief from the ever-rising death toll, one of the biggest sensations was a new and apparently unauthorized T-shirt featuring an image of the cartoon brat. "AIDS is a global crisis, dude," reads the caption coming out of Bart's mouth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
To this day, freeway and street signs directing motorists to Orange County's Little Saigon continue to be spattered with paint or defaced in some way. As land markers, they're very simple. The only unique accent is the reflective dots that rim the state's large, green, 4-foot-by-12-foot signs. Judging from the damage, they generate powerful emotional reactions. Little Saigon signs have been uprooted with shovels, bashed by vehicles and mauled with chain saws, according to one official for the state Department of Transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
There has been considerable hand-wringing in recent years about America losing its competitive edge to the Japanese. We invent it, they make it. Cars, TVs, VCRs, computer chips, farm equipment, high-tech gizmos of all sorts. The Japanese are even gobbling up huge chunks of swank real estate, movie studios and other symbols of Americana. Well, maybe all that was inevitable, interest rates, labor costs, and free-market competition being what they are. But its time to take a stand.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
For the youth of China, the past month's events in Tian An Men Square are certain to assume a mythic status exceeding even that of the famed Woodstock music festival for Americans who came of age in the 1960s. Music has been secondary to politics in what will be known as the great 1989 democracy rallies of Tian An Men Square. But two songs have played important roles in protests that appear on the verge of toppling Premier Li Peng from office: China's national anthem and the revolutionary socialist hymn, "The Internationale."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
I sometimes fancy myself an intrepid urban explorer. Like the time in New York when I discovered I could forgo the subway and walk to work across the Brooklyn Bridge. That is, until the dank summer arrived. There were no showers at The Wall Street Journal. When I returned to California, I took up bicycling to work in Riverside. The newspaper there even installed special bike racks to encourage the practice. Again, no showers. But that wasn't too bad. The heat was dry. A bigger problem was health-threatening smog, which accumulates in Riverside with the regularity of raindrops in Seattle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
There has been considerable hand-wringing in recent years about America losing its competitive edge to the Japanese. We invent it, they make it. Cars, TVs, VCRs, computer chips, farm equipment, high-tech gizmos of all sorts. The Japanese are even gobbling up huge chunks of swank real estate, movie studios and other symbols of Americana. Well, maybe all that was inevitable, interest rates, labor costs, and free-market competition being what they are. But its time to take a stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
To this day, freeway and street signs directing motorists to Orange County's Little Saigon continue to be spattered with paint or defaced in some way. As land markers, they're very simple. The only unique accent is the reflective dots that rim the state's large, green, 4-foot-by-12-foot signs. Judging from the damage, they generate powerful emotional reactions. Little Saigon signs have been uprooted with shovels, bashed by vehicles and mauled with chain saws, according to one official for the state Department of Transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
They call it the "sandwich generation." That may sound like baloney and the makings of even more puns. But for those of us who have joined the ranks, it is no joke. The term refers to adults who are caring for not only their own children, but their aging parents as well. Squeezed in the middle, they are raising children while juggling the emotional, financial and logistical problems of playing parent to their own parents. Caring for the elderly is nothing new, but this "middle generation squeeze" is bound to become a growing issue, according to Sharon Hamill, a doctoral student at UC Irvine who is studying multigeneration families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The public flocked to a Newport Beach courthouse last week to watch F. Lee Bailey in action, defending Pomona surgeon Thomas A. Gionis against charges that he masterminded an attack on his ex-wife, Aissa Wayne, and her boyfriend. The Massachusetts lawyer drew appreciative laughs and gasps of awe from the standing-room-only gallery as he used his legendary courtroom wit to argue that his client was not involved in the attack on John Wayne's daughter and then-boyfriend Roger W. Luby.
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